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NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY I 

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North 

Carolina 

State 

University 



Bulletin 




Undergraduate Catalog 
1977-1979 



December, 1976 



This catalog is intended for informational purposes only. Requirements, 
rules, procedure-, courses and informational statements set forth herein 
are subject to change. Notice of changes will be conveyed to duly enrolled 
students and other appropriate persons at the time such changes are 
effected. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 
VOLUME 76 DECEMBER 1976 NUMBER 4 

Published four times a year in February, June, August and December by North Carolina State 
University, Department of Admissions, Peele Hall, P. O. Box 5126, Raleigh, N. C. 27607. Second 
cla i "stage paid at Raleigh, N. C. 27611. 

Martha G. Daughtry, University Catalog Editor ; Joseph S. Hancock, Assistant Director, Publica- 
tions ; Hardy D. Berry, Director, Information Services. 




North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Undergraduate Catalog 

1977-79 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Sixteen Constituent Institutions 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., D.C.L., President 

Raymond Howard Dawson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President — Academic Affairs 

L. Felix Joyner, A.B., Vice President — Finance 

John L. Sanders, A.B., J.D., Vice Presideyit — Planning 

Cleon Franklyn Thompson, B.S., M.S., Vice President — Student Services and Special 

Programs 
George Eldridge Bair, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Educational Television 
Hugh S. Buchanan Jr., B.A., Associate Vice President — Finance 
Kennis R. Grogan, B.S., M.B.A., C.P.A., Associate Vice President — Finance 
Charles Ray Coble Jr., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Vice President — Planning 
James L. Jenkins Jr., A.B., Assistant to the President 
Edgar Walton Jones, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Vice President — Research and 

Public Service Programs 
John P. Kennedy Jr., S.B., B.A., M.A., J.D., Secretary of the University 
Arnold Kimsey King, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant to the President 
Roscoe D. McMillan Jr., B.S., Assistant to the President for Governmental Affairs 
Richard H. Robinson Jr., A.B., LL.B., Assistant to the President 
Robert W. Williams, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Vice President — Academic 

Affairs 



The University of North Carolina was chartered in 1789 and opened its doors to 
students at its Chapel Hill campus in 1795. Throughout most of its history, it has 
been governed by a Board of Trustees chosen by the Legislature and presided over 
by the Governor. During the period 1917-1972, the Board consisted of one hundred 
elected members and a varying number of ex-officio members. 

By act of the General Assembly of 1931, without change of name, it was merged 
with The North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro and The North Carolina 
State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh to form a multicampus 
institution designated The University of North Carolina. 

In 1963 the General Assembly changed the name of the campus at Chapel Hill 
tc Hie University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and that at Greensboro to The 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro and, in 1965, the name of the campus 
at Raleigh was changed to North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

Charlotte College was added as The University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 
1965, and, in 1969, Asheville-Biltmore College and Wilmington College became 
The University of North Carolina at Asheville and The University of North 
Carolina at Wilmington respectively. 

A revision of the North Carolina State Constitution adopted in November 1970 
included the following: "The General Assembly shall maintain a public system of 
higher education, comprising The University of North Carolina and such other 
institutions of higher education as the General Assembly may deem wise. The 
General Assembly shall provide for the selection of trustees of The University of 
North Carolina. . . ." In slightly different language, this provision had been in the 
Constitution since 1868. 

On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly in special session merged, without 
changing their names, the remaining ten state-supported senior institutions into 
the University as follows: Appalachian State University, East Carolina Univer- 
sity, Elizabeth City State University, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina 
Agricultural and Technical State University, North Carolina Central University, 
North Carolina School of the Arts, Pembroke State University, Western Carolina 
University, and Winston-Salem State University. This merger, which resulted in a 
statewide multicampus university of sixteen constituent institutions, became effec- 
tive on July 1, 1972. 



The constitutionally authorized Board of Trustees was designated the Board of 
Governors, and the number was reduced to thirty-two members elected by the 
General Assembly, with authority to choose their own chairman and other officers. 
The Board is "responsible for the general determination, control, supervision, 
management, and governance of all affairs of the constituent institutions." Each 
constituent institution, however, has its own board of trustees of thirteen members, 
eight of whom are appointed by the Board of Governors, four by the Governor, and 
one of whom, the elected president of the student body, serves ex officio. The 
principal powers of each institutional board are exercised under a delegation from 
the Board of Governors. 

Each institution has its own faculty and student body, and each is headed by a 
chancellor as its chief administrative officer. Unified general policy and appro- 
priate allocation of function are effected by the Board of Governors and by the 
President with the assistance of other administrative officers of the University. 
The General Administration office is located in Chapel Hill. 

The chancellors of the constituent institutions are responsible to the President 
as the chief administrative and executive officer of The University of North 
Carolina. 



North Carolina State University 

Administration and Offices 



Chancellor 

Joab L. Thomas 
Provost and Vice Chancellor 

Nash N. Winstead 
Assistant Provosts 
Murray S. Downs 
Lawrence Clark 
University Extension 

William L. Turner, Vice Chan- 
cellor, Extension and Public 
Service 
Research 

Earl G. Droessler, Vice Provost 
a nd Dea n for Re sea rch 
International Programs 

Jackson A. Rigney, Dea)i 
Graduate School 

Vivian T. Stannett, Vice Provost 
and Dean 
Business Affairs 

George L. Worsley, Vice Chancel- 
lor, Finance and Business 
Foundations and Development 

Rudolph Pate, Vice Chancellor 
Information Services 

Hardy D. Berry, Director 
School of Agriculture and Life Sciences 
J. E. Legates, Dean 
Edward W. Glazener, Associate 
Dean and Director, Academic 
Affairs 
George Hyatt Jr., Associate Dean 
and Director, Agricultural Ex- 
tension Service 
Kenneth R. Keller, Associate Dean 
and Director, Research 

School of Design 

Claude McKinney, Dean 
School of Education 

Carl J. Dolce, Dean 
Robert T. Williams, Associate 
Dean 
School of Engineering 

Ralph E. Fadum, Dean 
John F. Ely, Associate Dean, Aca- 
demic Affairs 
Henry B. Smith, Associate Dean, 
Research and Graduate Pro- 
grams 
John R. Hart, Assistant Dean, Ex- 
tension 
School of Forest Resources 
Eric L. Ell wood, Dean 
LeRoy C. Saylor, Associate Dean 
School of Liberal Arts 

Robert 0. Tilman, Dean 

William B. Toole, Associate Dean 



School of Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences 

Arthur C. Menius, Dean 
Jasper E. Memory, Associate Dean 
School of Textiles 

David W. Chaney, Dean 
M. R. Shaw, Assistant Dean, Re- 
search 
M. L. Robinson, Academic Coordi- 
nator 
Dame S. Hamby, Associate Dean 
for Textiles Extension 
Library 

Issac T. Littleton, Director 
Student Affairs Division 

Banks C. Talley, Vice Chancellor 
Henry Bowers, Associate Dean 
Gerald G. Hawkins, Associate 

Dean 
Ronald C. Butler, Associate Dean 
Robert K. White, Associate Dean 
Thomas H. Stafford, Associate 
Dean for Planning Research 
and Special Programs 
Admissions 

Anna P. Keller, Director 
Student Development 
John A. Poole, Dean 
Music Department 

J. Perry Watson, Director 
University Studeiit Center 
Henry Bowers, Director 
Career Planning and Placement 
Center 

Raymond E. Tew, Director 
Counseling Center 

Eleanor H. Lammi, Director 
Financial Aid 

Carl 0. Eycke, Director 
Registration and Records 

James H. Bundy, Registrar 
Residence Facilities 

Eli D. Panee, Director 
Residence Life 

Paul B. Marion, Director 
Student Health Programs 
Carolyn S. Jessup, Director 
Alumni Affairs 

Bryce Younts, Director 
Athletics 

Willis R. Casey, Director 
Physical Plant 

Charles C. Braswell, Director 
Students Supply Stores 

G. Robert Armstrong, General 
Manager 



CONTENTS 



North Carolina State University 7 

Programs of Study 9 

Admissions 13 

Registration 17 

Tuition and Fees 18 

Financial Aid 21 

Student Housing 22 

Academic Regulations 24 

Special Programs 33 

The D. H. Hill Library 33 

General Information 34 

Student Activities 37 

Centralized Computational Resources 41 

University Calendar 42 

Schools and Programs of Study 45 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 47 

Design 88 

Education 97 

Engineering Ill 

Forest Resources 135 

Liberal Arts 147 

Physical and Mathematical Sciences 159 

Textiles 173 

University Studies 181 

Military Education and Training 182 

Graduate School 184 

University Extension 184 

Water Resources Research Institute 185 

Course Descriptions 187 

Administration and Faculty 333 

Administrative Council 333 

Board of Trustees 333 

Board of Governors 334 

Teaching and Professional Faculty 335 

Index 373 

Campus Map 378 




■ ■ iii 



Professor Richard Myers, presi- 
dent. Faculty Senate, and Lu 
Anne Rogers, president, Student 
Government with Chancellor 
Thomas. 




North Carolina State University 

North Carolina State University is one of the nation's major public universities — 
large, complex, national and international in scope, and a leader in scientific re- 
search. 

It ranks among the top universities in the nation, and shares the distinctive 
character of Land-Grant state universities nationally — broad academic offerings, 
extensive public service, national and international activities, and large-scale ex- 
tension and research programs. 

Academic excellence is well represented in more than 90 bachelors of arts and 
science programs, 68 masters degree fields and 46 doctoral degrees. 

Research activities span a broad spectrum of about 700 scientific, technological 
and scholarly endeavors, with a budget of approximately $20 million annually. 

Extension work on a statewide basis in each of the 100 counties underscores the 
idea that the University's campus extends to the state's boundaries. Diverse ex- 
tension programs include urban affairs, marine sciences, environmental protection, 
engineering, industrial, business and textiles, agricultural and many others. 

The annual University budget is more than $100 million. The University has 
4,600-plus employees. There are 1,621 faculty and professional staff and 174 
adjunct and federal agency faculty, including 1,075 graduate faculty. 

There are 120 campus buildings with an estimated value of about $150 million. 

The central campus is 596 acres, though the University has 88,000 acres on a 
statewide basis, including one research and endowment forest of 78,000 acres. 
Near the main campus are research farms; biology and ecology sites; genetics, 
horticulture, and floriculture nurseries; forests, and areas such as Carter Stadium 
which comprise about 2,500 acres. 

The University's Wolfpack athletics teams are well-known nationally. The 
basketball team was national champion in 1974-75. The football team has been 
the Atlantic Coast Conference champion four times and co-champion twice and 
has won three bowl games in the last decade. The Wolfpack is now fielding 
women's inter-collegiate athletics teams. 

North Carolina State University is one of the three Research Triangle Universi- 
ties along with Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. In the 30-mile triangle formed by the three universities is the 5,000-acre 
Research Triangle Park, the Research Triangle Institute, a Universities's subsidiary, 
and the Triangle Universities Computation Center, a central facility for the ex- 
tensive computing centers of the institutions. 

N. C. State's enrollment is about 17,000. There are 13,600 undergraduates, and 
3,300 graduate students. Students at State come from 50 states and more than 60 
other countries. The international enrollment is a distinctive feature of the insti- 
tution since its 500 international students give it a decidedly cosmopolitan aura. 

State is one of 118 members of the National Association of State Universities 
and Land-Grant Colleges. Even though these institutions constitute less than 5 
percent of the 2,500 colleges and universities in the nation, they are truly the 
nation's major institutions. They enroll about 30 percent of all U.S. college students 
— 2.9 million out of 9.7 million, and award 38 percent of all degrees awarded in 
the United States, including 64 percent of all doctoral degrees. 



Chancellor Thomas has described NCSU as a "magnet of progress," noting that 
its faculty have been attracted from more than 150 of the top universities of the 
nation and the world. Some 30 nations are represented. A recent study showed 
that the Research Triangle area has more Ph.D's proportionate to population than 
any area of the nation. The Triangle universities — State, Duke and UNC-Chapel 
Hill — plus the Research Triangle Park, constitute a notable concentration of 
knowledge. 

NCSU is dedicated to advancing knowledge, providing superior education and 
serving the people. It looks to the future with optimism and confidence. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



About 2,300 different courses are taught at North Carolina State University. 
These range from basic courses for freshmen to high level courses available only to 
graduate students working on Ph.D. degrees. The importance of this number of 
courses to students is that thev constitute a wide range of curricula, that is, "fields 
of studv or majors, such as history, chemical engineering, business or conserva- 
tion. Equally important, the courses can be combined in special cases to form 
entirely "new" majors or specializations of the student's particular interest. This 
is the case with a program in Liberal Arts called Multidisciplinary Studies. 

X. C. State offers about 90 rather clearly defined undergraduate programs of 
studv. In addition it offers options in manv fields, such as the science, business or 
technology options in a number of agricultural fields. 

The following is a listing of the majors offered at N. C. State as undergraduate 
degree programs, specialized curricula, or options. 



Agriculture 

Agricultural Economics 

Agronomy 

Animal Science 

Biological and Agricultural Engi- 
neering 

Crop Science 

Food Science 

Horticultural Science 

Nutrition 

Pest Management for Crop Pro- 
tection 

Poultry Science 

Soil Science 

Business and Economics 

Accounting 

Business Management 

Economics 

Biological Sciences 

Biological Sciences (General) 

Biochemistry 

Botany 

Entomology 

Fisheries and Marine Biology 

Microbiology 

Wildlife Biology 

Zoology 

Design 

Architecture 
Landscape Architecture 
Product Design 
Visual Design 

Education (inch teacher certification) 

Agricultural 
English 



French Language and Literature 

Industrial Arts 

Mathematics 

Science (biology, chemistry, earth 

science, & physics) 
Secondary Education 
Social Studies (economics, history, 

political science, & sociology) 
Spanish Language and Literature 
Technical 
Vocational Industrial 

Engineering 

Aerospace 

Chemical 

Civil 

Construction 

Electrical 

Engineering Science and Mechan- 
ics 

Engineering Operations 

Furniture Manufacturing and 
Management 

Industrial 

Materials 

Mechanical 

Nuclear 

Forestry and Wood Sciences 

Forestry 

Pulp and Paper Science and Tech- 
nology 
Wood Science and Technology 

Humanities 

English and American Literature 
French Language and Literature 
History 
Philosophy 



Spanish Language and Literature 

Speech-Communication 

Writing-Editing 

Individualized Programs 

Individualized Study Program 
(Agriculture and Life Sciences) 

Multidisciplinary Studies (Liberal 
Arts) 

Mathematics and Related Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 

Statistics 

Physical Sciences 

Chemistry 
Geology 
Meteorology 
Physics 

Medical and Veterinary Sciences 
Medical Technology 
Pre -dental 



Pre-medical 
Pre-veterinary 

Psychology 

Experimental Psychology 
Human Resource Development 
Psychology 

Recreation and Natural Resources 

Conservation 

Recreation Resources Adminis- 
tration 

Social Sciences 

Criminal Justice 
Political Science 
Rural Sociology 
Social Work 
Sociology 

Textiles 

Textile Chemistry 
Textile Technology 



Agricultural Institute 

This two-year program requires high school graduation and a letter of recom- 
mendation. The program does not carry college credit. An Associate of Applied 
Science degree is awarded. Fields of studv are: 



Agricultural Equipment Technology 

Agricultural Pest Control (Agricultural, Urban and Industrial Options) 

Field Crops Technology 

Flower and Nursery Crops Technology 

Food Processing, Distribution and Service 

General Agriculture 

Livestock Management and Technology (Dairy and Animal Husbandry Options) 

Soil Technology 

Turfgrass Management 

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES AND OPTIONS LEADING TO DEGREES 
Bachelor's degrees of: 

Design environmental design in architecture; environmental design in 

landscape architecture; and environmental design in product 
design (including option in visual design). 

Liberal Arts social work. 

Bachelor of Science degrees in: 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 

(Business) agricultural economics; animal science; horticultural science; 

and poultry science. 



10 



(Science) agricultural economics; animal science; biological and agri- 

cultural engineering; biological sciences (including options in 
biochemistry, microbiology, and nutrition); botany; conserva- 
tion; crop science; entomology; food science; horticultural 
science; medical technology; pest management for crop pro- 
tection; poultry science; pre-veterinary option; rural sociology 
(including option in criminal justice); soil science; wildlife 
biology; and zoology (including options in pre-dental and 
pre-medical; fisheries and marine biology). 

(Technology) agronomy; animal science; biological and agricultural engineer- 
ing; food science; horticultural science; and poultry science. 

Individualized Study Program in Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

Education agricultural education; industrial arts education; mathematics 

education; science education (including biologv, chemistry, 
earth science, and physics); secondary education; technical 
education; and vocational industrial education. 

Engineering aerospace engineering; biological and agricultural engineer- 

ing; chemical engineering; civil engineering; construction 
option; electrical engineering; engineering operations; engi- 
neering science and mechanics; furniture manufactur- 
ing and management; industrial engineering; materials engi- 
neering; mechanical engineering; and nuclear engineering. 

Forest Resources conservation; forestry; pulp and paper science and technology; 
recreation resources administration; and wood science and 
technology. 

Liberal Arts economics English; history; philosophy; and political science. 

Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

chemistry; computer science; geology; mathematics; meteorol- 
ogy; physics; and statistics. 

Textiles textile chemistry; and textile technology. 



Bachelor of Arts degrees in: 

Education psychology (including options in experimental; human resource 

development). 

Liberal Arts accounting; business management; economics; English (in- 

cluding options in teacher education; writing-editing); French 
(including option in teacher education); history; multi-disci- 
plinary major in liberal arts; philosophy; political science (in- 



11 



eluding option in criminal justice); social studies education 
option (in economics, history, politics, or sociology); sociology 
(including option in criminal justice); Spanish (including option 
in teacher education); and speech-communication (including 
option in teacher education. 



Physical and Mathematical Sciences 
geology. 



Professional degrees (fifth year) in: 



chemical engineering; civil engineering; electrical engineering; 
industrial engineering; materials engineering; mechanical engi- 
neering; and nuclear engineering. 



GRADUATE DEGREES 

Master's degrees of: 

adult and community college education, agricultural education, 
agriculture, architecture, biological and agricultural engineer- 
ing, biomathematics, chemical engineering, civil engineering, 
curriculum and instruction, economics, educational adminis- 
tration and supervision, electrical engineering, engineering 
(off-campus program), engineering science and mechanics, 
forestry, guidance and personnel services, industrial arts educa- 
tion, industrial engineering, landscape architecture, life sci- 
ences, mathematics education, mechanical engineering, occu- 
pational education, product design, public affairs, recreation 
resources, sociology, science education, special education, statis- 
tics, technology for international development, textile tech- 
nology, urban design, vocational industrial education, wildlife 
biology, wood and paper science. 

Master of Arts programs in: 

economics, English, history, and political science. 

Master of Science programs in: 

adult and community college education, agricultural economics, 
agricultural education, animal science, applied mathematics, 
biochemistry, biological and agricultural engineering, biomathe- 
matics, botany, chemical engineering, chemistry, civil engineer- 
ing, crop science, curriculum and instruction, ecology, educa- 
tional administration and supervision, electrical engineering, 
engineering science and mechanics, entomology, food science, 
forestry, genetics, geology, guidance and personnel services, 



12 



horticultural science, industrial arts education, industrial engi- 
neering, management, marine sciences, materials engineering, 
mathematics, mathematics education, mechanical engineering, 
microbiology, nuclear engineering, nutrition, occupational edu- 
cation, operations research, physics, physiology, plant pathol- 
ogy, poultry science, psychology, recreation resources adminis- 
tration, rural sociology, science education, soil science, special 
education, statistics, textile chemistry, textile technology, voca- 
cational industrial education, wildlife biology, wood and paper 
science, and zoology. 



Doctor of Philosophy programs in: 



animal science, applied mathematics, biochemistry, biological 
and agricultural engineering, biomathematics, botany, chemical 
engineering, chemistry, civil engineering, crop science, eco- 
nomics, electrical engineering, engineering science and me- 
chanics, entomology, fiber and polymer science, food science, 
forestry, genetics, horticultural science, industrial engineering, 
marine sciences, materials engineering, mathematics, mathema- 
tics education, mechanical engineering, microbiology, nuclear 
engineering, nutrition, operations research, physics, physiology, 
plant pathology, psychology, science education, sociology, soil 
science, statistics, wood and paper science, and zoology. 

Doctor of Education programs in: 

adult and community college education, curriculum and in- 
struction, educational administration and supervision, guidance 
and personnel services, industrial arts education, and occupa- 
tional education. 

Consult the Graduate Catalog for further information on graduate programs 
and admissions procedures. 



Admissions 

Freshman applications to the Universitv for the fall semester or summer sessions 
should be submitted during the fall of the senior year in high school. Based on 
past experience, applications and credentials received in the fall and early winter 
have received full consideration while those applications received later have been 
(and may be again) subject to a waiting list, depending upon space availability. 
Those students whose applications are placed on a waiting list will be notified of 
their final status by June 1. 

Applicants for the School of Design should submit applications by January 1. 
Applications for the spring semester should be submitted prior to November 1; 
however, all acceptances for the spring semester are subject to space availability. 



13 



Each applicant must complete an application form which may be obtained from 
high school counselors or by writing to: 

Director of Admissions 

P. O. Box 5126 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 

A nonrefundable $10 fee must accompany the completed application. 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION 

Applicants normally should be graduates of an accredited high school and have 
the recommendation of the principal or counselor. Non-graduates should usually 
have a high school equivalency certificate, the minimum high school mathematics 
preparation, and present other evidence of maturity and ability to deal effectively 
with college work. 

Prospective students should have the following high school credits (courses): 

English — 4 years 

History — 2 years 

Mathematics — 2 years of algebra; 1 year of geometry; advanced algebra and 
trigonometry is recommended for some programs 

Science — 2 years, preferably biology, chemistry or physics 

Foreign Languages — 2 years required for Liberal Arts School only 

Information the University needs for admissions purposes includes: the high 
school record showing grades through the junior year, a listing of courses in 
progress in the senior year, an overall grade point average based on at least three 
years of high school study, scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or ACT, 
and the field of study or curriculum preferred. 

In addition to adequate high school preparation, each freshman must meet a 
minimum Predicted Grade Average computed on the basis of the high school grade 
point average and scores on the SAT or ACT. The grade point average carries 
greater weight in the prediction than the test scores. 

Applicants are accepted on either junior or senior test scores, although senior 
scores are recommended, especially if the applicant is also applying for financial 
aid. An interview is not required and does not weigh in the admissions decision; 
however, a prospective student is always welcome to visit the Admissions Office, 
112 Peele Hall, from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Two-Year Agricultural Institute 

Requirements for admission to the Agricultural Institute, a two-year terminal 
program, include graduation from an accredited high school or successful comple- 
tion of the high school equivalency examination administered by the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction. The application should include a copy of the high 
school record or a letter indicating the applicant has passed the equivalency 
examination, and a letter of recommendation. Each application is reviewed and 
evaluated by the Institute Director. SAT scores are not required. 



14 



Freshman Class Profile 

Who makes up the student body at North Carolina State University? Fifty-five 
percent of the freshmen who entered in August 1975 were in the top fifth of their 
high school graduating class; eighty-two percent, in the top two-fifths. High school 
performance is usually considered the best predictor of success in college; how- 
ever, applicants who do well on the SAT or ACT exams and have "low" high 
school averages should not be discouraged from applying for admission. In 1975-76, 
the freshman class at N. C. State had average SAT scores of 475 Verbal and 534 
Mathematics. 

Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), American College Testing Program 
Achievement Tests, Advanced Placement 

Scholastic Aptitude Test and American College Test — Applicants for admission 
as freshmen must take the College Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Apti- 
tude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT) and request that their 
scores be sent directly from the Board to North Carolina State University (Code 
No. — R5496). Information booklets and application forms may be obtained from 
school counselors or by writing: 

College Entrance Examination Board 

Box 592 

Princeton, New Jersey 08540 



American College Testing Program 

P. O. Box 414 

Iowa City, Iowa 52240 

Achievement Tests — Achievement Test scores are not used in the admissions 
decision; however, freshmen who take the English and Math Level I Achievement 
Tests will receive more accurate placement in the beginning English and math 
courses. The fall and winter test dates are considered the best time for taking 
these tests. 

Advanced Placement — A student may qualify for advanced placement by one or 
more of the following means: 1) by passing a proficiency examination adminis- 
tered bv a teaching department; 2) by attaining a sufficient predicted grade in 
English (PGE) which is based on the SAT Verbal score and either the high school 
record or the CEEB English Achievement score; 3) by attaining a sufficient 
predicted grade in mathematics (PGM) which is based on the SAT Mathematics 
score and either the high school record or the CEEB Mathematics Achievement 
score; 4) by meeting a specific minimum score on certain of the CEEB Advanced 
Placement Program (APP) examinations; and 5) bv attaining at least a minimum 
score on certain of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests. 

OUT-OF-STATE STUDENTS 

Undergraduate applicants from outside North Carolina must meet highei 
standards than required of N. C. residents in some fields of study before admission 



15 



will be granted. North Carolina State University is limited to accepting not more 
than 15 percent of total undergraduate admissions from outside the State. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

North Carolina State University welcomes transfer applicants, and in recent 
vears, more than 25 percent of our graduates started their college programs at 
other institutions. 

All transfer applicants must have an overall 2.5 average on all college-level 
work taken at accredited institutions and must be eligible to return to the last 
institution regularlv attended. At least 28 semester hours of "C" work are required, 
or the applicant must meet freshman admissions requirements. Applications of 
students from non-accredited institutions are reviewed by the Admissions Com- 
mittee. 

Work completed at technical institutes is generally not considered college level; 
however, after enrolling at North Carolina State University, students from such 
institutes may take comprehensive examinations in courses in which they feel 
previous training qualifies them for advanced placement. 

If admitted, the prospective transfer student's record will be further evaluated 
to determine the amount of credit that can be transferred and applied toward 
degree requirements at N. C. State. This evaluation will be approved by the dean 
of the school in which the student wishes to enroll. Transcripts are not evaluated 
however until the applicant has been admitted. A nonrefundable $2 transcript 
evaluation fee, payable to North Carolina State University, is charged for this 



ADDITIONAL CLASSIFICATIONS 

Unclassified Students — An unclassified student is one who has been approved 
for admission to a specific school and is earning college credit but has not chosen 
a specific curriculum. He or she must meet the same admissions requirements 
as regular students. If, at a later date, an unclassified student wishes to change to 
regular status, credits must be evaluated for his or her chosen curriculum. 

Special Students — The special student classification is primarily designed for 
students 18 years of age or older who are employed in the Raleigh area, including 
homemakers and other mature individuals interested in college courses for special 
reasons, but who do not desire to work toward a degree at North Carolina State 
University. The usual college admissions requirements mav be waived for qualified 
special students, but regular rules of scholarship apply after admission. A maxi- 
mum of 2 courses per semester may be taken by "special" students. 

Special student applications should be made through the Division of Continuing 
Education, McKimmon Extension Education Center, corner of Western Boulevard 
and Gorman Street. If special students wish to change to regular status at a later 
date, they must make regular application through the Admissions Department and 
meet the same admissions requirements as other degree candidates. 

Auditors— New students desiring admission as auditors should also apply through 
the Division of Continuing Education. Auditors receive no college credit; however, 
they are expected to attend classes regularly. Auditor participation in class dis- 
cussion and in examinations is optional with the instructor. 



16 



SERVICEMEN'S OPPORTUNITY COLLEGES, COLLEGE LEVEL 
EXAMINATION PROGRAM 

Servicemen's Opportunity Colleges (SOC)— College level courses offered by 
accredited institutions and made available to military personnel through SOC will 
be considered for transfer credit if a grade of "C" or better has been earned and if 
the courses are applicable to the student's curriculum. A transcript must be sent 
to the Director of Admissions directly from the institution offering the course. 

College Level Examination Program — CLEP primarily serves non-traditional 
students who have acquired knowledge through University extension courses, 
educational television, non-credit adult education programs, on-the-job training, 
and independent study by enabling them to demonstrate their knowledge and 
receive college credit on the basis of examinations. 

There are two types of examinations, General Examinations and the Subject 
Examinations. Although only a limited amount of credit is given for the General 
Examinations, most Subject Examinations are accepted for credit. The examina- 
tions are given at N. C. State during the third week of each month, and candi- 
dates should register three weeks before the test date. 

For further information write or telephone the Counseling Center, North Caro- 
lina State University, Box 5072, 200 Harris Hall, Raleigh, N. C. 27607; (919) 
737-2423. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Procedures and policies governing graduate admission are outlined in a special 
catalog issued by the Graduate School. For a copy of the Graduate School catalog 
contact: 

Dean of the Graduate School 

104 Peele Hall 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 

READMISSIONS 

See readmissions procedures, page 29. 

Registration 

Pre registration: To preregister a student meets with his or her adviser to discuss 
an academic program and to select courses for the next semester. The courses 
selected bv each student are processed through the computer which assigns a day 
and an hour for each course requested. During the registration period at the 
beginning of each semester, the student obtains a completed class schedule. 
Schedule of Courses listings are available for even' semester and they contain all 
necessarv instructions for completing preregistration. To be preregistered, a student 
must submit a Preregistration Schedule Request form to Registration and Records 
during the specified preregistration period. 

Registration: Registration consists of three steps: 1) paying tuition and fees — 
preferably by mail, 2) completing registration forms, and 3) obtaining class 
schedules. Students who register late must follow late registration instructions and 
pay the required late fees. Instructions for completing registration and late regis- 

17 



tration are issued each semester and summer session. Each student is expected to 
complete registration in person. Under no circumstances is a preregistered student 
considered officially registered until such time as the student has picked up a 
class schedule and completed the registration forms. 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION 

A regularly enrolled undergraduate degree student who is enrolled in at least 
eight credit hours at North Carolina State University may take course work at one 
of the Raleigh colleges, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, at the 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro or at Duke University. Interinstitu- 
tional registration forms and all registration procedures are available from Registra- 
tion and Records. 

SCHEDULE CHANGES— DROPS AND ADDS 

Courses mav be freely added during the first week of a regular semester and 
with the permission of instructor, courses may be added through the second week. 
Courses may be freely dropped until the end of the fourth week of the semester 
without grades for these courses appearing on the student's permanent academic 
record. After that time no courses may be dropped without approval by the dean 
of the student's school. If a student is enrolled for only one course and wishes to 
drop it, the procedure is that of withdrawal from the University. 

Tuition and Fees 

North Carolina Resident— S262. 15 per semester (S165 tuition plus $97.15 fees) 
Nonresident — $1,085.15 per semester ($988 tuition plus $97.15 fees) 
A statement of tuition and fees is mailed to each preregistered student around 
30-40 days before the beginning of any semester. The statement must be returned 
with full payment or complete financial assistance information bv the due date 
appearing on the statement. Normally the due date is approximately one week 
before classes begin. Fees are the same for both residents and nonresidents and are 
required of all regularly enrolled students. Nonresident students are required to 
pay an additional $823.00 per semester for tuition. A few non-preregistered stu- 
dents pay their tuition and fees at registration. 

ESTIMATED ANNUAL UNDERGRADUATE EXPENSES 

Tuition and Fees 

N. C. Residents 

Out-of-State Residents 

Room Rent 

Board (estimated) 

Books and Supplies (estimated) 

Other personal expenses and 

incidentals (estimated) 

Total— N. C. Resident 
(Non resident t 
NOTE: All charges are subject to change without notice 

18 



Fall 


Spring 




Semester 


Semester 
$ 262.15 


Year 


$ 262.15 


$ 524.30 


( 1,085.15) 


( 1,085.15) 


( 2,170.30) 


180.00 


180.00 


360.00 


495.00 


495.00 


990.00 


87.50 


87.50 


175,00 


200.00 


200.00 


400.00 


$1,224.65 


$1,224.65 


$2,449.30 


^$2,047.65) 


($2,047.65) 


($4,095.30) 



Expenses Other Than Tuition and Fees 

Application Fee— A nonrefundable fee of $10 must accompany each application 
for admission. Transfer students must pay an additional $2 ($12 total) as a 
transcript evaluation fee. 

Room Rent — New incoming students receive a room application card with pay- 
ment instructions in the letter of acceptance. Continuing students are pro- 
vided a card with instructions at their residence hall rooms. 

Board — Meals are paid for individually at the various dining facilities available 
both on and near the campus. 

Books and Supplies — Books and supplies are usually purchased during the first 
week of classes often directly from the Students Supply Stores. 

Personal Expenses — Personal expenses vary widely among students but the yearly 
estimate of $400 is based on what students have told us they spend on these 
items. 

REFUND POLICY 

A student who officially withdraws from school during the first two weeks of 
classes will receive a tuition and fees refund of the full amount paid less a registra- 
tion fee. The withheld registration fee amounts to $15 the first week and $25 the 
second week. After the two week period, no refunds will be made. 

In some instances, circumstances justify the waiving of rules regarding refunds. 
An example might be withdrawal from the University because of sickness. Stu- 
dents have the privilege of appeal to the Refund and Fees Committee when they 
feel special consideration is merited. Applications for such appeals may be 
obtained from the Office of Business Affairs or the Division of Student Affairs. 

An itemization of required fees and other detailed information concerning ex- 
penses or related data can be obtained by contacting the Office of Business Affairs, 
P. O. Box 5067, Raleigh, N. C. 27607, (919) 737-2986. 

RESIDENCE STATUS 

Until May of 1973, determination of a student's residence status for tuition pur- 
poses rested upon the easily administered statutory' requirement that "a legal 
resident must have maintained his domicile in North Carolina for at least 12 
months next preceding the date of enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of 
higher education in this State," with the express proviso that "student status in an 
institution of higher learning in this State shall not constitute eligibility for resi- 
dence to qualify said student for in-state tuition" (G.S. 116-143.1, 1971) (emphasis 
added). The administrative consequence of this law was to make necessary, in 
most cases, only one inquirv concerning residence status for each student, at the 
outset of the higher education experience, since time spent enrolled as a student 
could not be counted in satisfaction of the 12-month eligibility requirement. 

The 1973 Session of the General Assembly amended the applicable law, so as 
to read in pertinent part as follows: 

"(b) To qualify for in-state tuition a legal resident must have maintained his 
domicile in North Carolina for at least the 12 months immediately prior to his 
classification as a resident for tuition purposes. In order to be eligible for such 
classification, the individual must establish that his or her presence in the State 
during such 12-month period was for purposes of maintaining a bona fide domicile 

19 



rather than for purposes of merely temporary residence incident to enrollment in 
an institution of higher education; further, (1) if the parents (or court-appointed 
legal guardian) of the individual seeking resident classification are (is) bona fide 
domiciliaries of this State, this fact shall be prima facie evidence of domiciliary 
status of the individual applicant and, (2) if such parents or guardian are not bona 
fide domiciliaries of this State, this fact shall be prima facie evidence of non- 
domiciliary status of the individual." (University regulations concerning the classi- 
fication of students by residence, for purposes of applicable tuition differentials, 
are set forth in detail in A Manual to Assist The Public Higher Education Institu- 
tions of North Carolina in the Matter of Student Residence Classification for Tuition 
Purposes. Each enrolled student is responsible for knowing the contents of that 
Manual, which is the controlling administrative statement of policy on this 
subject. Copies of the Manual are available for review on request at the Admis- 
sions Office, 112 Peele Hall, North Carolina State University.) 

The essential change effected by the 1973 amendment to this statute is that 
a person who is an enrolled student is no longer necessarily precluded from demon- 
strating during the period of one's enrollment that he or she in fact has become a 
legal resident of North Carolina entitled to the in-state tuition rate. The adminis- 
trative consequences of this modification of the law are substantial. Two inquiries 
are mandated by the statute. First, has the applicant for classification as a legal 
resident in fact resided in North Carolina for a minimum period of 12 months 
immediately prior to the proposed effective date of his or her classification as a 
resident for tuition purposes? Second, during the 12-month period in question, did 
the applicant's presence in the State constitute legal residence? Thus, a carefully 
detailed inquiry must be made in each such case concerning the residential status 
of the applicant, as measured by established legal principles which control the 
disposition of questions about the place of legal residence of an individual. 

CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES 

A. Initial Classification — A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institu- 
tion (or permitted to re-enroll following an absence from the institutional program 
which involved a formal withdrawal from enrollment) shall be classified by the 
admitting institution either as a resident or as a nonresident, for tuition purposes, 
prior to actual matriculation. Particular officials or offices of the institution shall 
be designated to evaluate all such initial classification cases and to assign an 
appropriate classification consistent with the requirements of State law and the 
provisions of this manual. Basic data on which such assignment shall be based 
shall be collected in accordance with the common informational form prescribed 
herein (see Appendix B of Residence Manual, 1973, as revised 7/74 and 7/75, 
NCSU); additional data or documentation deemed essential to a reliable determi- 
nation may be elicited from the student, as deemed appropriate bv the responsible 
official or office. 

B. Subsequent Classification Inquiries: Reclassification— A residential classifica- 
tion once assigned (and confirmed pursuant to any appellate process invoked) may 
be changed thereafter only at intervals corresponding with the established primary 
divisions of the academic calendar of the institution, viz., at the beginning of a 
semester, quarter, or otherwise denominated basic interval of the academic calen- 
dar. No change in residential status for tuition purposes (and thus no change in 
applicable billing rates) shall be effected during such a semester, quarter, or 
term, with resulting increases or decreases in the tuition obligation on a pro rata 
basis for a portion of such semester, quarter, or term. 

The institution shall provide to each student at the time of and in connection 
with the transmission to him or her of each periodic bill for tuition charges a 



20 



notice of the circumstances under which and the time at which a change in 
classification may occur. The notice shall be of the type prescribed in Appendix C 
of the Residence Manual, July 1973, as revised 7/74 and 7/75, NCSU. 

Financial Aid 

To gain consideration for all forms of aid administered by the Financial Aid 
Office, a student needs to obtain both a Parents' Confidential Statement (PCS) and 
a Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) application (a new freshman may 
get these forms from his or her high school; a continuing student may obtain them 
from the Financial Aid Office). The parents should complete each form and then 
submit them to the appropriate offices, preferably before February 1 of the year of 
expected fall enrollment and by November 15 for spring consideration. New fresh- 
men should also inquire about the North Carolina Student Incentive Grant. Infor- 
mation on this grant should be available from the high school counselor or may 
be obtained from the Financial Aid Office. 

Awards are made to applicants on the basis of financial need and admission to 
the University. Determination of a student's need is based on estimated educa- 
tional costs and a consideration of the family's financial strength— family income, 
student's summer savings, family asset holdings and debts, and other resources 
that may be available for use such as G.I. Bill benefits, Social Security, Vocational 
Rehabilitation assistance, etc. 

Aid is available on a non-discriminatory basis to all qualifying students. These 
awards are usually offered in combinations of scholarship or grant, loan, and/or 
a work-study job, depending upon the degree of need. Continuing students must 
have a satisfactory record of academic achievement in order to have their aid 
renewed, and a new application must be submitted each year for continued aid. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Each financial aid applicant who submits the PCS and BEOG is automatically 
considered for any scholarship for which he or she qualifies. Some special "name" 
scholarships have curricular, geographic, or other special restrictions involved. 

GRANTS 

Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (for which all students who have never 
received a bachelor's degree must apply) will provide awards ranging from $200 
to SI, 400 to qualified students. 

N. C. Student Incentive Grant is a grant program for legal residents of North 
Carolina. Entering freshmen and students who have received the grant before 
have priority for future grants. Grants range up to $1,500 per academic year. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are made from federal funds to 
undergraduate students from low-income families in amounts of $200 to $1,500 
per year and limited to no more than half the total amount of aid given the student. 
They are especially useful in encouraging promising new students to attempt 
college. 



21 



ATHLETIC AWARDS 

Athletic awards are made upon the recommendation of the Department of 
Athletics to students who meet the established qualifications for such awards. A full 
award provides tuition, fees, room, meals and books. 

LOANS 

National Direct Student Loans — Both undergraduate and graduate students 
carrying at least halftime academic loads may be awarded these loans. Loans, 
like other forms of financial aid, are need-based. Nine months after ceasing to be 
enrolled at least halftime, a student must begin paying interest on his or her loan 
at 3% per year as well as assuming a $30 per month minimum repayment obliga- 
tion. In order to establish a repayment schedule, borrowers are expected to have 
exit interviews at the loan office in the Office of Business Affairs just prior to 
graduation or other termination of studies. 

Institutional Loans — A limited amount of other long-term loan money is available 
in several funds, and loans made therefrom are on essentially the same liberal 
terms as the National Direct Student Loans. 

Guaranteed Student Loans — These are federal loans provided through banks and 
private lenders in the various states. Interest is at 7% per year with the Federal 
Government paying the interest during the in-school period for students who 
qualify for the interest benefit. In North Carolina, College Foundation, Inc. 
administers the program. Information and forms are available in the Financial Aid 
Office. 

Emergency Short-Term Loans — These are available in small amounts, usually not 
exceeding $100, to enable qualified students to meet unexpected expenses. These 
loans are usually to be repaid within 30 days and are not extended beyond the 
end of a term or graduation. 

COLLEGE WORK-STUDY 

The federally supported Work-Study Program provides jobs on campus for 
students who qualify with need in the same manner as is required for scholarship 
or long-term loan assistance. Pay rates vary with the job. Similar off-campus pro- 
grams, mainly in the summer, supplement the campus program as a part of the 
total Work-Study plan. 

OTHER STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

The Financial Aid Office operates an employment service to assist any student 
who wants possibilities for part-time or summer work. No particular academic or 
economic qualifications are required to obtain jobs on- or off-campus outside the 
College Work-Study Program. A list of current job openings is available at the 
Financial Aid Office in Peele Hall. 

Student Housing 

North Carolina State University furnishes housing for approximately 6,395 
students. The University operates residence halls which house 3,813 men and 



22 



1,722 women students. In addition, 300 apartments are available for married 
students and 14 University-owned fraternity and sorority houses accommodate 
560 students. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

The residence halls are operated to provide opportunities through a variety of 
group living experiences which will complement and expand the residents' educa- 
tional experiences. Each hall is staffed with selected students, both graduate and 
undergraduate, who are responsible directly to professionally trained people in 
their area and to the Director of Residence Life. Staff members are available to 
help students initiate programs and activities and to advise and assist residents in 
any way possible. 

Living arrangements in buildings vary. Six high-rise buildings are arranged in 
suites of four or five rooms sharing a bath; the other buildings have a center 
corridor with rooms opening on to it. Rooms are furnished but residents must 
provide bed linen, pillows and towels. (See page 34 for linen and blanket rental.) 

To be eligible for University housing one must enroll as a regular full-time 
student (an undergraduate must carry a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester). 

Room Rentals and Reservations — All rooms rent for $180 per semester; this rate 
is subject to change on a year to year basis. Reservation cards are mailed with the 
letter of acceptance for admission to the University. These reservation cards and 
the check for the rent must be returned to the Office of Business Affairs in accord- 
ance with the dates established by the Department of Residence Life before 
room assignments can be made. 

Refund of Room Rent — If a room reservation is cancelled at the Office of Resi- 
dence Life, Harris Hall, in person or in writing on or before the first day of classes 
(the date of cancellation is the date notification is received by that office), the rent 
paid will be refunded less a $25 processing fee. After the first day of classes, a 
refund will be given only if there is a waiting list of room applicants from which the 
vacated space can be filled. A refund given after the first day of classes will be the 
rental fee paid less the $25 processing fee and a prorated daily charge from the first 
day of classes until the room is vacated. Students who fail to notify the Residence 
Life Office and who fail to check in and secure their keys on or before 5 p.m. the 
first day of classes will have their reservation cancelled without refund. 

HOUSING FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

The University operates 300 apartments in E. S. King Village for married 
students. The rental is $60 for an efficiency, $71 for a one-bedroom, and $82 for 
a two-bedroom including water only (gas is included in efficiency units). This 
rate is subject to change on a year to year basis. Information on availability and 
applications should be requested from the Department of Residence Life, Box 
5072, Raleigh, N. C. 27607. 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 

Raleigh has numerous privately owned apartments and houses available for 
rent to University students. A partial listing is located in the Residence Life Office 
in Harris Hall. No listing is published because of the rapid turnover. 



23 



The University does not operate a trailer parking area; however, privately 
owned parks are available within a reasonable distance of the campus. 

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

Seventeen of the 20 fraternities and all five social sororities chartered bv the 
University maintain chapter houses. Twelve of the fraternities and two of the 
sororities are housed on Fraternity Row, a University-owned project; the remain- 
ing eight fraternities and three sororities are located throughout the immediate 
community. 

Rental fees vary in fraternity houses depending on the individual chapter, 
but are approximately the same as the residence hall rates. 

Academic Regulations 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Regular degree students are classified at the beginning of each semester and 
summer session. The required number of hours of each classification is: 

Classification Semester Hours of Earned Credit 
Freshman (FR) Less than 28 

Sophomore (SO) 28 or more, but less than 60 

Junior (JR) 60 or more, but less than 92 

Senior (SR) 92 or more 

Agricultural Institute students are designated as first (01) year if thev have 
earned less than 28 semester credits and second (02) vear if thev have earned 28 
or more semester credits. 

Unclassified students (UN) are those working for college credit, but not en- 
rolled in a degree-granting program. Admission as an unclassified student requires 
the dean's recommendation in the school in which the student wishes to enroll. 
Unclassified students must meet the same entrance requirements as regular degree 
students and must meet the same academic requirements to continue. 

Special (non -degree) students in the various schools are non-degree candidates 
carrying seven hours (two courses) or less in a semester. Special students must 
meet the same academic requirements as regular degree students in order to 
continue during a semester. Individuals in this category are called UGS if they 
have not obtained a baccalaureate degree, and PBS if they have obtained at least a 
baccalaureate degree. 

SEMESTER COURSE LOAD AND SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

The University considers a minimum full-time semester load as 12 credit hours 
for undergraduates and nine credit hours for graduate students. The maximum load 
for a semester is 21 credit hours for undergraduates and 15 credit hours for 
graduate students. To carry more than the maximum, a student must consult his 
or her adviser and obtain the approval of the dean of his or her school. 

Permission is granted only under extenuating circumstances. Also, undergradu- 



24 



A 


Excellent 


B 


Good 


C 


Satisfactory 


D 


Marginal 


NC 


No Credit 



ate degree students who plan to register for 19 or more credit hours must obtain 
approval from their advisers. 

For a regular summer session, a student must have the same approval if he or 
she carries more than seven credit hours. 

NOTE: The number of hours for which a student is officially enrolled is that 
number in which the student is enrolled at the end of the second week of classes 
(i.e. the last dav to withdraw or drop a course with a refund). 

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT MEASURES 

Grading System 

(Definition of Letter Grades and Quality Points) 

Grade Definition Quality Points Per Credit Hour 

4 
3 
2 

1 


(The following grades do not have 
quality points and are not calculated 
in the determination of quality point 
averages.) 

S Satisfactory (Credit-only and 

certain other courses) 
U Unsatisfactory (Credit-only and 

certain other courses) 
CR Credit by Examination or Ad- 
vanced Placement 
IN Incomplete 
LA Temporarily Late 
AU Audit 
NR No Recognition Given for Audit 

Explanation of Letter Grades 

D — Marginal. This grade will be used to recognize that a student's performance 
was marginal but clearly better than that of students who receive NC. (See 
section on GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS for policy on limiting the num- 
ber of D credits which may be used to fulfill graduation requirements.) 

NC — No Credit. This grade will be used to indicate that the student is not to 
receive course credit. 

S — Satisfactory. This is a passing grade to be awarded only when the quality of 
the student's work is judged to be C or higher level. It is used as the passing 
grade for students who are taking free elective courses under the credit-only 
option. It may also be used for certain courses approved by the Provost, such as 
orientation courses, seminars, and research problems, in which A, B, and C 
grades are not appropriate. 



25 



U — Unsatisfactory. This is used to indicate that the student is not to receive 
credit for a credit-only or other course for which the passing grade would be S 
{Satisfactory). 

CR — Credit. This is used bv the Registrar to indicate course credit received by 
examination or advanced placement as certified by appropriate departments or 
schools. This grade shall be awarded only when the advanced placement testing 
indicates that the quality of the student's work in the course would have been 
expected to be of C or higher levefT"' 

IS— Incomplete. This is a temporary grade. At the discretion of the instructor, 
a student mav be given an IN grade for work not completed because of a serious 
interruption in his work not caused bv his own negligence. An IN grade must 
be made up bv the end of the next regular semester (not including summer 
sessions) the student is in residence unless the instructor or teaching department 
involved is not able to allow the makeup. In the latter case, the instructor or 
teaching department will notify the student and the Department of Registration 
and Records when the IN grade must be made up. 

The student must not register again for the course while the IN grade stands. 
Any IN grade not removed bv the end of the next regular semester in residence 
or during the period specified bv the instructor or teaching department will 
automatically become a No Credit (SC) grade and will count as a course 
attempted. 

NOTE: In the case of a graduating student who has received an IS, the 
following procedures will apply: 

If the course is needed for graduation, the student will not be allowed to 
graduate until the work has been made up. 

If the course is not needed for graduation, the school dean or director of 
instruction must either (1) notifv in writing the Department of Registration and 
Records that the IN grade is to be changed to a W or (2) notify in writing the 
Department of Registration and Records that permission has been given for the 
IN to remain and that a deadline has been established for the completion of the 
course. In the event that the course is subsequently not completed satisfactorily, 
the school dean or director of instruction shall notifv in writing the Department 
of Registration and Records that the IN grade is to be changed to a W. 

LA — Temporarily Late. The LA is an emergency symbol to be used only when 
grades cannot be reported bv the teaching department or the professor on time. 
The LA differs from the IN grade in that the student receiving the LA has com- 
pleted the work of the course including the examination. The LA should not be 
used by a teaching department or the instructor unless it is absolutely neces- 
sary; when it is used the following procedure should be used: 

a. Return the Grade Report Rolls at the regularly scheduled time with the 
LA clearly marked. 

b. Secure a Late Grade Report Form (pink) from Registration and Records 
or departmental office. 

c. Return late grades on the Late Grade Report Form (pink) at the earliest 
possible time and not later than 15 days after the examination. 

NOTE: It should be kept in mind that the semester grade reports of 
those students who receive an LA will not be complete. This 



26 



situation often causes students to be uninformed as to their 
academic eligibility and as to the correctness of their schedules 
for the following semester. 

Correction of Error in Grading — When submitted to Registration and Records, 
end of course grades are final and not subject to change by reason of a revision 
of the instructor's judgement; nor are submitted grades to be revised on the basis 
of a second trial (e.g., a new examination or additional work undertaken or com- 
pleted). Changes may be made onlv within one calendar year after the date final 
grades were submitted in order to correct an error in computation or transcribing, 
or where part of the student's work has been unintentionally overlooked. 

QUALITY POINT AVERAGE 

The number of credit hours officially attempted in a semester or summer session 
(for which a report of A,B,C,D,XC is received) is divided into the total number of 
quality points earned (see chart, page ) to arrive at the Quality Point Average 
(QPA). The Quality Point Average of work attempted will be computed to three 
decimal points and used solely for class ranking and academic recognition. 

For example, if a student takes 17 credit hours, earning an A in two 3-credit 
courses, a B in one 3-credit course, and one 2-credit course, a C in a 3-credit course 
and a NC in a 2-credit course, the quality point average would be: 

6 (credits of A) x 4 (quality points per credit hour) = 24 

5 (credits of B) x 3 (quality points per credit hour) = 15 

3 (credits of O x 2 (quality points per credit hour) = 6 

2 (credits of NO x (quality points per credit hour) = 

45 

The total number of qualitv points earned (45) divided bv the number of credit 
hours attempted (17) equals the grade point average, in this case 2.647. 

Semester Dean's List — Any full-time undergraduate student who earns a 
semester average of 3.5 or better on 12 to 14 hours of course work for which 
quality points are earned or 3.25 or better on 15 or more hours of course work for 
which quality points are earned is placed on the semester Dean's List. Students 
with NC or IN grades are not eligible for the Dean's List. Dean's List achievement 
is noted on the student's grade report and permanent academic record. 

Class Rank — A student's ranking in his or her class will be determined on 
the basis of the Qualitv Point Average and will be indicated on his or her perma- 
nent academic record upon graduation. 

GRADE REPORTS 

At the end of each semester or summer session, Registration and Records issues a 
grade report showing all grades earned during that grading period. 

At registration students will be asked to complete an address form giving a 
mailing address to which grade reports and other University correspondence will 
be mailed. Students have the choice of having their grade reports sent to their 
parents or guardians. However, students may elect to have their grade reports 
sent directly to themselves. 

Change of Name or Address — It is the student's responsibility to inform Regis- 
tration and Records of any changes in name or address. Failure to do this may 



27 



prevent prompt delivery of important University correspondence. Also, news 
stories about Dean's List students are sent to N. C. newspapers based on home- 
town information furnished Registration and Records. 

ACADEMIC RETENTION-SUSPENSION RULES 

An undergraduate student shall be suspended at the end of any academic year 
or summer session if that student fails to pass at least 50 percent of the cumulative 
hours attempted with satisfactory grades or better (A, B, C, S, and CR). Total 
credit hours passed with grades of A, B, C, S, and CR are divided by total credit 
hours attempted to determine this percentage. Grades of D, NC, U (plus F, FD, 
FA, and Fl which were used prior to the 1974 fall semester) are less than satis- 
factory. (Note: NC grades made prior to the 1974 fall semester are not calculated 
in the cumulative hours attempted.) 

The exceptions to the above suspension policy are that no student will be sus- 
pended (a) at the end of the fall semester, (b) at the end of the spring semester if 
that is the student's first semester, or (c) at the end of any semester in which that 
student has passed nine or more credit hours with satisfactory or better grades 
(A, B, C, S, and CR), or 50 percent of the hours completed in the case of a student 
officially enrolled that semester for less than 12 credit hours at the end of the 
second week of classes. 

Suspended students are eligible to attend the summer session at NCSU and/or 
take independent study by extension (formerly correspondence) courses offered 
by NCSU to improve their academic standing and will be eligible for readmission 
when they have raised their cumulative percentage of total hours passed with 
grades of C, its equivalent or better, to at least 50 percent of the total hours 
attempted at NCSU. 

Students who were suspended prior to the 1974 fall semester under the quality- 
point- deficit system will be eligible for readmission if they have passed with 
grades of A, B, C, S, and CR at least 50 percent of the total hours attempted at 
NCSU. Suspended students who have had a break in residency must file an 
Application for Readmission. 

Appeal of Suspension — The Admissions Committee will consider petitions from 
a suspended student when there are extenuating circumstances. A letter of petition 
should be written by the student to the Admissions Committee stating: 

a. The reason for his or her academic difficulty; and 

b. The reasons why the student believes he or she can now be successful in 
meeting the University's academic standards and complete all degree re- 
quirements within a reasonable length of time; and 

c. The address and telephone number to be used for notification of the Ad- 
missions Committee's decision. 

A student who has been denied readmission on his or her petition letter may 
subsequently request a personal appearance before the Admissions Committee. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

If a regularly enrolled degree student wishes to withdraw from the University 
(dropping all courses) during a semester or summer session, the student initiates 
the official withdrawal process at the Counseling Center. 



28 



Determination of grades and the entry on the permanent academic record for a 
student withdrawing during a semester depend upon his or her reasons for 
withdrawal and the time of withdrawal in the semester. A student who discon- 
tinues attendance in all classes without officially withdrawing will receive all NC 
grades. 

A student who withdraws after the first two weeks of classes of a semester will 
receive no refund of tuition and fees, except in unusual cases approved by the 
Refund Committee. All courses dropped prior to the fourth week of classes in a 
semester will not appear on the permanent academic record. 

Withdrawal from a regular semester constitutes a break in the student's resi- 
dence, and, if the student plans to return, he or she must file a readmission form 
even though preregistration for the next academic period may have been com- 
pleted. 

READMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS 

A former student returning is one who a) was not in attendance during the fall 
or spring semester prior to applying for readmission or b) withdrew from the 
University during a fall or spring semester. All former students returning, both 
graduates and undergraduates, must apply for readmission to the Department of 
Registration and Records, N.C.S.U., P.O. Rox 5745, Raleigh, N.C. 27607 at least 
30 days prior to the date of desired enrollment. 

A student who receives a bachelor's degree must apply for admission to the 
Graduate School or for readmission as an unclassified or professional student. An 
undergraduate working toward a second degree must reapply only if there has 
been a break in residence. Otherwise, only a curriculum change form indicating 
the desired second major must be submitted to Registration and Records. 

Preregistration alone is not sufficient to enable the student to be readmitted. 

Regulations 

1. A student who was eligible to continue at N.C. State at the time of his or her 
leaving is eligible to return (except as indicated immediately below). Students 
in this categoy need only complete a readmission form. 

a. A student who was eligible to continue at the time of his or her leaving but 
who has subsequendy taken work at another institution and earned less 
than a C average on such work must complete a readmission form and 
write a letter of petition to the Admissions Committee. 

b. A student eligible to continue at the time of his or her leaving who has 
subsequently taken correspondence and/or extension work at N.C. State 
and earned grades which resulted in suspension must complete a readmis- 
sion form and write a letter of petition to the Admissions Committee. 

2. Suspended Students. For condition of suspension, see Academic Retention- 
Suspension Rules, page 28. For readmission, follow procedures outlined under 

"Appeal of Suspension." 

REPEATING COURSES 

A student who repeats a course, regardless of the grade previously made, will 
have both grades counted in his or her cumulative Quality Point Average. An 



29 



undergraduate student is allowed as many semester hours as are appropriate in 
one's curriculum for courses: 1) titled seminar, special problems, special topics, 
independent study or research (usually numbered 490-499 or 590-599); 2) cover- 
ing topics different from those studied when the courses were taken previously. 
However, for any courses other than one that satisfies these conditions, if a student 
repeats and passes the course both times, the semester hours will be counted only 
once toward the number of hours required for graduation. 

The adviser's approval is required for a student to repeat any course previously 
passed. Approval should not be given when a student wishes to repeat a course 
already passed with a grade of A or B. Nor should it be given when: 1) a student 
wishes to repeat a lower division course that he or she has passed with a grade of 
C or better after successfully completed an advanced course covering the same 
material or 2) a student wishes to repeat a lower level course that he or she has 
passed with a C or better which is a prerequisite for an advanced course that he 
or she had already successfully completed. 

CREDIT-ONLY COURSES 

Each undergraduate student has the option to count toward graduation require- 
ments a maximum of 12 semester hours in the category of "credit-only" courses 
(exclusive of courses which departments or instructors choose to grade on a 
Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory basis with the approval of the Provost's Office). The 
student may select as "credit-only" any course offered by the University except 
those in Military Science and Aerospace Studies. Selected courses must be included 
under the free elective category of the specific curriculum in which the student 
is enrolled. The student will be responsible for attendance, assignments and 
examinations. 

The student's performance in a "credit-only" course will be reported as S 
(Satisfactory grade for credit-only course) or U (no credit grade for credit-only 
course) and will not affect his or her Qualitv Point Average. An S allows the course 
credit to be counted toward the student's graduation requirements. "Credit-only" 
work may drop a student below 12 hours of course work for which quality points 
are earned and thus make him or her ineligible for the semester Dean's list. 

AUDITS 

A student wishing to audit a course must have the approval of his or her 
adviser and of the department offering the course. Participation in class discussion 
and in examinations is optional with the instructor. Auditors receive no course 
credit; however, thev are expected to attend classes regularly. 

A student who has taken a course for audit may, with his or her adviser's 
approval, enroll in the course for credit during a subsequent semester or summer 
session. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

A currently registered undergraduate student (degree, unclassified, or special) 
desiring to take an examination for course credit in lieu of enrolling or re-enrolling 
for a course must initiate a request with his or her adviser (except when a 
teaching department initiates group testing of beginning students for placement 



30 



purposes and grants credit). If the adviser approves, the student arranges for the 
examination with the department offering the course. The department may admin- 
ister the examination in any manner pertinent to the materials of the course. The 
academic standards for credit by examination will be commensurate with the 
academic standards for the course. 

If the student performs satisfactorily on the examination, the instructor will 
notifv Registration and Records on a late grade report form by stating "Credit by 
Examination." The appropriate number of credit hours is entered on the student's 
permanent academic record and he or she is issued a grade report. Credits earned 
in this manner are considered in the same way as transfer credits and are not 
used in the computation of the student's Quality Point Average. Registration and 
Records will post course credit to the permanent academic record only if the 
student is currently registered unless the student is a graduating senior and this is 
the only course required for graduation. If the student does not exhibit satisfactory 
performance, no action beyond notifying the student is required. However, the 
student is not eligible for another such examination in the same course. Once a 
student has failed a course or has attempted more than fifty percent of a course, 
he or she may not attempt credit by examination for that course. Under unusual 
circumstances, exceptions may be made upon the written recommendation of the 
adviser and the approval of the department concerned. 



CURRICULUM CHANGE 

To initiate a curriculum change, a student secures a Curriculum Change Form 
from the office of his or her dean or director of instruction, obtains the required 
signatures, and files the completed form with Registration and Records, preferably 
by the end of the preregistration period. 

From the standpoint of advising, preregistration, and dropping courses, the 
student is considered to be in the new curriculum as soon as the Curriculum 
Change Form is completed and filed with Registration and Records, and his or 
her records are transferred to the new department. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students are eligible for graduation when they have satisfied all the academic 
requirements of their degree program as specified by their major department, their 
school, and NCSU. 

Limited D Grades — A grade of C, its equivalent or better, is required for each 
course in a student's degree program. A student's major department, however, 
(a) may accept up to 12 credit hours of L/s for graduation and (b) may designate 
courses or categories of courses in which Us will not be accepted for graduation. 
A statement of departmental policy in this matter shall accompany all curricula 
material distributed to students. All D grades earned prior to 1974 fall semester 
mav be used to satisfy course requirements insofar as they are allowed at that time 
by the department granting the degree. No more than 12 additional credits of D 
earned in the 1976 fall semester, or thereafter, may be used to satisfy course 
requirements for courses in which the D grade is acceptable to the department 
granting the degree. 



31 



Quality Point Average — Since the 1974 fall semester, the Quality Point Average 
has not been a part of the graduation requirements. 

Previous Quality Point Deficits — Students who have quality point deficits in- 
curred prior to the 1974 fall semester may select one of two options to achieve 
eligibilitv for graduation: 

a. making up those quality point deficits which were incurred prior to the 
1974 fall semester by earning a sufficient number of A or B grades. (D 
grades mav be repeated for this purpose.) NC grades received during the 
1974 fall semester or thereafter, and D grades earned during the 1976 fall 
semester or thereafter shall have no effect on quality point deficits incurred 
by students prior to the 1974 fall semester; or 

b. repeating with a C grade or better all courses required for graduation in 
which the previous grade was a D and for which D grades have been 
determined to be unacceptable bv the student's major department. 

Under this option the courses repeated may not be counted as free electives 
and the make-up of any pre-existing quality point deficit shall not be 
required. 

Transfer and Independent Study Credits — Individual departments and/or 
schools may determine their own limits, if any, of credit hours for transfer and/or 
independent study bv extension (formerly correspondence) courses. 

Residence Requirements — A transfer student, to be eligible for a bachelor's 
degree, normally must earn at least 20 of his or her last 30 hours of credit in 
residence on this campus; however, individual departments and/or schools may 
waive this guideline and determine their own residency requirements for a 
bachelor's degree. 

Students who have satisfactorily completed the requirements for more than one 
bachelor's degree may, upon the recommendation of their deans, be awarded two 
bachelor's degree at the same or at different commencement exercises. To earn 
two degrees the student registers in one school or department and, with the co- 
operation of the second school or department, works out his or her program to 
cover the requirements for both. The student must file an approved Curriculum 
Change Form labeled "Second Degree" with Registration and Records. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF ACADEMIC RECORD 

A transcript is an exact copy of a student's permanent academic record at the 
time it is issued. A fee of one dollar is charged for each transcript. 

No official transcript may be issued to or for a student who is indebted to the 
University' until such indebtedness has been paid or satisfactorily adjusted. 

Official transcripts are released onlv upon the written request of the student 
to Registration and Records, Box 5745, Raleigh, N.C. 27607. 

NONDISCRIMINATION STATEMENT 

North Carolina State University is dedicated to equality of opportunity within 
its community. Accordingly, North Carolina State University does not practice or 
condone discrimination, in any form, against students, employees, or applicants on 
the grounds of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or handicap. North 



32 



Carolina State University commits itself to positive action to secure equal oppor- 
tunity regardless of those characteristics. 

North Carolina State University supports the protection available to members 
of its community under all applicable Federal laws, including Tides VI and VII 
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 
Sections 799A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay and Age 
Discrimination Acts, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Executive Order 11246. 
For information concerning these provisions, contact: 

Dr. Lawrence M. Clark 

Assistant Provost & Affirmative Action Officer 

208 Holladay Hall 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 

Special Programs 

HONORS PROGRAMS 

Honors Programs are designed to provide individualized programs of study for 
promising young scholars. The Schools of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Engineer- 
ing, Forest Resources, Liberal Arts, Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and 
Textiles have separate plans built around honors courses, supervised research, 
and special seminars. Students who demonstrate exceptional ability and achieve- 
ment during their freshman or sophomore year are eligible to participate. Infor- 
mation is available from faculty advisers and from the office of the dean of each 
school. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

The Schools of Engineering, Forest Resources, Liberal Arts, Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences and Textiles offer an optional five-year plan under which 
students mav alternate semesters of work in their professional field with on-campus 
studv during the sophomore and junior years. Students who want to participate 
in a co-op program should discuss the possibilities with their faculty advisers. 

The D. H. Hill Library 

The D. H. Hill Library's book and bound journal collection totals some 750,000 
volumes and is particularly strong in the biological and physical sciences, in 
engineering, agriculture, and forestry. The arts, humanities, and social sciences 
are also well represented. The library regularly receives more than 6,500 maga- 
zines, journals and other periodical publications. 

Three special collections form on-campus branches of the Hill Library — the 
Burlington Textiles Library in Nelson Hall containing holdings in textile tech- 
nology and textile chemistry; the Harrye B. Lyons Design Library in Brooks Hall 
containing holdings in architecture, landscape architecture and product design; 
and the Forest Resources Library and reading room in Biltmore Hall. 



33 



The library's collections are open to all students and faculty for over 100 hours 
per week. 

General Information 

FOOD SERVICE 

Food Service is provided at the University Student Center, the University 
Student Center Annex and in six campus snack bars. The average cost of food for 
the academic vear is estimated to be $990. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Every student desiring to park on campus is required to register his or her 
vehicle(s) with the Traffic Records Office and pav a registration fee. A booklet of 
regulations is published and distributed each fall. 

No student mav register or acquire parking permits for a vehicle not owned by 
the student, his or her spouse, a parent, or a guardian. The Chancellor shall have 
authority to establish the number of vehicles which anv student may register and 
operate pursuant to these regulations. Unless increased by the Chancellor, the 
number of said vehicles shall be one. 

LAUNDRY 

The University operates a laundry and dry cleaning facility on campus at 
reasonable prices. Branch offices are located in the residence halls for the con- 
venience of the students. 

LINEN AND BLANKET RENTAL 

During the regular academic year and summer school the student may rent at 
a reasonable rate a linen bundle (consisting of 2 twin bed sheets, 3 towels, pillow- 
case) and/or pillow. The student may exchange his linen weekly at the branch 
offices in the residence halls or the main laundry on Yarborough Drive. An N. C. 
State University monogrammed blanket is also sold through this program. These 
services are available to both on- and off-campus students. Application forms for 
the regular academic year are mailed in July to each student. Students wishing the 
service for summer school terms should apply to Office of Auxiliary Services, 203 
Holladay Hall, N. C. State University. 

Upon withdrawal from the program, and at the request of the user, refunds are 
made based on weeks used and less a small handling charge. 

HEALTH 

North Carolina State University seeks to safeguard the health of the student in 
every way possible. The Student Health Service, located in Clark Hall Infirmary, 
offers medical care to students on an outpatient and inpatient basis. The 50 bed 
facility is staffed by full-time physicians, registered nurses and other medical sup- 
port personnel. 

During the scheduled academic sessions, the Health Service is open 24 hours 



34 



a day, seven days a week. Physicians maintain regular office hours Monday through 
Friday and are on call at all times to assist the nurses on duty when the condition 
of a patient warrants immediate attention. 

Each full-time student pays a medical fee which covers professional services 
either as an outpatient or inpatient; i.e., visits to M.D., routine laboratory pro- 
cedures and X rays performed in the Student Health Service, and medications 
available in the student pharmacv. 

In all cases of serious illness or injury, notice to the immediate family is 
strongly encouraged. This notice will be made by the attending physician unless 
expressly forbidden by the student. All health and medical information is confi- 
dential and is not divulged to an von e without the written consent of the patient. 

A physical examination is required of all entering full-time students, and the 
completed examination form should be mailed to the Student Health Service 
thirty days before a student is scheduled to register for the first time. If the 
examination is not made before entrance, the student will be given a physical 
examination at the University for which a fee is charged. Blanks for the physical 
examination may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. 

ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE 

The University offers annually a plan of student accident and health insurance. 
The insurance covers the surgical, accident, and hospital needs of the student as a 
supplement to the services offered through the infirmary. Each year complete 
information will be made available to students before school opens. 

Foreign students are required to enroll in the accident and health insurance 
plan provided through the University or to have similar coverage under other 
insurance plans or arrangements with their sponsors. 

ORIENTATION 

During the month of June, an orientation program is held for freshmen entering 
N. C. State for the first time in the fall semester. Freshmen are expected to attend 
the two-day program that corresponds with their major field of study. In the event 
an entering freshman cannot attend the summer program in June, a "late" orienta- 
tion is held in August just prior to the beginning of fall semester. 

Transfer students who are entering N. C. State for the first time in the fall 
semester are encouraged to attend the Transfer Student Orientation Program held 
on registration day. 

Special orientation sessions are held for students who enter in the spring 
semester or either summer school session. 

In addition, the Office of Student Development sponsors an optional orienta- 
tion program for black students during the fall semester. 

COUNSELING 

The Counseling Center in Harris Hall has a staff of full-time counselors to help 
students with adjustment to college life, vocational and curricular choice and other 
problems a student might wish to discuss with a professionally trained counselor. 
The Center administers vocational tests and maintains a file of occupational infor- 
mation to help guide students in career selection. 



35 



Referral can be made for students needing special kinds of help. 

Students may come to the Center on their own accord, or thev may be referred 
bv teachers, advisers or other members of the University staff. There normally is no 
charge for conferences; nominal fees are charged for group counseling and con- 
tinuing marriage counseling. 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

At North Carolina State University the primary responsibility for planning an 
academic program and meeting graduation requirements rests with the student. 
In order that information and assistance be available when needed, each regular 
degree student is assigned to a faculty adviser who is usually in the student's major 
field of study. 

School and department coordinators of advising, deans, directors of instruction, 
department heads and members of the faculty keep office hours and expect 
students to consult them individually whenever necessary. 

FOREIGN STUDENT AND STUDY ABROAD ADVISING 

The foreign student and study abroad adviser offers assistance to foreign stu- 
dents with visas, passports, currency permits, tax information, and medical, per- 
sonal and social problems. 

All foreign students are required to take an International Student Orientation 
course (ISO- 100) to acquaint them with University procedures and the practical 
problems of living in the United States. 

Any student desiring information on travel and study abroad may use the facili- 
ties of this office. International Student ID Cards may be purchased by qualifying 
full-time students. 

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT CENTER 

The Career Planning and Placement Center offers assistance to all students 
at North Carolina State University at all degree levels. Service is available on a 
year round basis. Advice on the relationship of personal career goals to various 
programs of study and assistance in the identification of individual aptitudes 
and abilities affecting career potential are available. Students are encouraged to 
participate in a Career Planning Workshop in the freshman or sophomore year. 

This office arranges and coordinates job interviews between students and 
employer representatives. Seniors are urged to use this placement service for 
interviewing with potential employers. The staff also recommends contacts with 
employers not scheduled to visit the campus, and will advise students of job 
opportunities given to the center by mail or telephone. 

COOPERATING RALEIGH COLLEGES 

Cooperating Raleigh Colleges is a consortium, or voluntary organization, com- 
prised of North Carolina State University, Meredith College, Peace College, St. 
Augustine's College, St. Mary's College and Shaw University. The organization 
promotes interinstitutional cooperation and cooperative educational activities 
among the six institutions. Agreements provide the opportunity for any student to 



36 



enroll at another institution for a course or courses not offered at one's home 
campus. (Also see Interinstitutional Registration, page 18.) 

Student Activities 

North Carolina State University makes every effort to provide the student with 
surroundings which are pleasant and conducive to intellectual growth. Respecting 
the student as an individual, the University assures him or her the maximum of 
personal liberty within the limits necessary for orderly progression of class work. 
In return, the student is expected to pay serious attention to his or her purpose in 
attending this University and to observe rules of conduct consistent with maturity. 
Through the various services and activities identified with everyday life on campus, 
as well as through the several extracurricular organizations and functions, the stu- 
dent at N. C. State has an opportunity for acquiring experience in group leader- 
ship and community living which may serve one well in one's professional career. 

STUDENT BODY GOVERNMENT AND STUDENT JUDICIAL SYSTEM 

When students enter North Carolina State University, they become members 
of a self-governing community. Legislative, executive and judicial authority, inso- 
far as student affairs are concerned, rest with the student body government which 
operates within the framework of over-all University administration. The student 
body government members and judicial department members are elected in 
campus-wide elections. 

During each registration period, students are asked to sign either an honor code 
pledge or a recognition of academic integrity statement. These statements reflect 
the emphasis that N. C. State student government places upon academic integrity. 

CLUBS AND SOCIETIES 

Honorary — Honorary societies at N. C. State are Golden Chain, senior leader- 
ship; Blue Key, junior leadership; Thirty and Three, sophomore leadership; Phi 
Eta Sigma, men's freshman scholarship; Alpha Lambda Delta, women's freshman 
scholarship; and Phi Kappa Phi, junior, and senior and graduate students scholar- 
ship. 

Professional and Technical — Each school at N. C. State sponsors or supervises 
a large number of professional and technical societies and clubs. Students in every 
area of instruction are encouraged to join with their fellow students in pursuing 
their common interests. Many of these organizations contribute greatly to the 
student's professional and social growth. 

Social Fraternities and Sororities — Twenty national social fraternities have 
chapters at State. 

The social fraternities at N. C. State are Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Phi Alpha, 
Delta Sigma Phi, Farm House, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, 
Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma 
Alpha Mu, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Pi, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon, Theta Chi, Alpha Sigma Phi and Delta Upsilon. 

State has five national social sororities, Sigma Kappa, Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha 



37 



Phi, Delta Sigma Theta and Alpha Kappa Alpha. 

Other Organizations — There are over 200 campus organizations that a student 
may join or participate in. These organizations cater to all interests and levels of 
involvement, and most are open to all students. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

A variety of publications, both general and school-sponsored, are edited and 
managed by student officers. A student may gain journalistic experience and train- 
ing in writing, editing or management by working on these publications. 

The four general publications, The Agromeck, WKNC-FM, the Technician, 
and the Windhover are supported in large part by a publication fee included in 
each student's fees. 

The Agromeck is the University yearbook, providing a record of the senior 
class and of the principal events of the school year. The yearbook recalls in pictures 
the varied activities of the student body through the year, and is published for the 
entire student body. 

The Technician is the student newspaper issued three mornings a week. 

Although it is not a publication in the strictest sense of the word, WKNC-FM 
serves the same function through a different medium. It offers opportunities for 
extracurricula training in broadcasting techniques as well as training in adminis- 
tration and program planning. 

The Windhover is the literary magazine for the campus. 

Each student receives a copy of the current handbook, which contains detailed 
information about student organizations, activities, and policies. 

Several of the schools have their own publications issued under the general 
supervision of the particular school and dealing with material of special interest 
to students in that school. These publications and the school they represent in- 
clude Agri-Life, Agriculture and Life Sciences; the Pi-Ne-Tum, Forest Resources; 
The Southern Engineer, Engineering; The Textile Forum, Textiles; The Publica- 
tions of the School of Design; and The Scientist, Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences. 

ATHLETICS 

North Carolina State University offers a variety of athletic activities. In addition 
to voluntary programs of intramural and intercollegiate sports, freshmen and 
sophomores are required to take two to four semesters of physical education. 
Juniors and seniors take physical education as an elective. 

Intercollegiate — The Department of Athletics conducts the University's inter- 
collegiate athletics program involving 14 varsitv sports for men and seven for 
women. 

The athletics program is administered by the Athletics Director with the 
Athletics Council, made of seven faculty, three alumni and three students, func- 
tioning to exercise institutional responsibility and control of the intercollegiate 
athletics program. The program is self-sufficient and is operated through gate 
receipts and student fees. Athletics grants-in-aid are provided through the North 
Carolina State Student Aid Association (Wolfpack Club). 

The University facilities include double-decker Carter Stadium, featuring 
41,000 sideline seats, Reynolds Coliseum holding 12,000 for basketball, and Doak 

38 



Field having 3,800 seats for baseball. A nine-lane tartan track and a 2,200 seat 
swimming stadium, with a twenty-five yard by twenty-five meter pool, are also 
available. 

Intramurals — The University maintains a program of intramural sports which 
is administered by the Department of Physical Education. Intramural activities 
are divided into three basic programs: traditional sports, sports clubs, and annual 
events. 

In the traditional sports program individual and team sports are offered to both 
men and women with participation being voluntary. Competition is divided into 
four divisions: 1) residence halls 2) fraternity 3) open and 4) women. Thirteen 
sports are offered in the residence hall and fraternity divisions, while 11 sports 
are offered in the open division. In the women's division competition is offered in 
13 different activities. 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Since the early days of North Carolina State, musical organizations have played 
an important part in campus life presenting concerts, furnishing music for official 
University functions and performing at athletic events. The combined membership 
of these organizations constitutes the largest voluntary student organization on 
campus. Students may join the bands, choral organizations, orchestras, and pipes 
and drums by reporting for an audition at the time and location indicated in the 
orientation schedule. Rehearsals are arranged to avoid conflicts with other classes 
or with study time. Membership in all musical organizations is open to any 
regularly enrolled student. 

Bands — The Symphonic Band, the Fanfare Band, the Brasschoir Band and the 
Marching Band make up the four divisions of the N. C. State bands. Each band 
serves a specific purpose and assignments are made according to individual in- 
terests and abilities. The Symphonic, Fanfare and Brasschoir Bands are concert 
organizations, with the Symphonic Band having the most rigid requirements. 

Choral Groups — The Varsity Men's Glee Club, the University Choir, the 
Women's Chorale, the University Singers and the Chamber Music Singers make 
up the five choral divisions. Placement in an organization is made according to 
the student's abilities and interest. These groups present concerts each year, both 
on and off campus, as well as making radio and television appearances, recordings, 
tours and providing small ensembles for special occasions. 

Orchestras — A wide range of orchestral music is read and performed. Placement 
in the North Carolina State University Symphonv Orchestra is according to 
individual interest and ability. Several concerts are presented each year on and 
off campus providing an opportunity to coordinate musical efforts with profes- 
sional musicians, recognized locally and nationally. Provisions are made for those 
with an interest in string quartet and other small ensemble experience. 

NCS Pipes and Drums — Students may learn an instrument known to many of 
North Carolina's early settlers and represent the University through a unique and 
distinctive medium, the NCS Pipes and Drums. The organization performs several 
times throughout the year at University and community functions. Pipes, drums, 
and equipment are furnished. No piping experience is necessary. 

Musician -in -Residence — North Carolina State University established this special 
chair in the music department to facilitate the University's cultural development. 



39 



Internationally known musicians are appointed to this position on a rotating basis. 
They are available without charge to all University classes and organizations for 
concerts and presentations. 

Music and the Technical Disciplines — The Schools of Engineering, Liberal Arts 
and Forest Resources, the Division of University Studies and the Department of 
Music are cooperating to foster interaction between the technical disciplines and 
music. 

Courses to be offered will undertake the scientific studv of musical sounds and 
the instruments which produce them. An interdisciplinary approach will enable 
students to combine these courses with their major fields. (For example, see Engi- 
neering Operations, page 123.) 

UNIVERSITY STUDENT CENTER 

The Universitv Student Center, with its branches in the Frank Thompson 
building and in the Erdahl-Cloyd wing of the D. H. Hill Library, provides a focal 
point for much of the extra-curricular life on campus. The programs it sponsors 
include training in all aspects of threatre, plays produced by students, instruction 
and independent work in all kinds of crafts, a wide range of professional perform- 
ances in jazz, pops, folk and classical music, dance and threatre. There are student 
committees working in all of these areas. Other student committees present 
lectures, films, games tournaments, black cultural programs, coffee houses, gallery 
exhibits and opportunities lor volunteer services. 

The facilities in the University Student Center and its branches include two 
theatres, a craft center, vending areas, newsstands, games rooms, a barber shop, 
the newspaper offices, yearbook office, radio station, Student Government offices, 
meeting rooms, offices for the IFC and IRC, off-campus students and space for 
religious workers. 

In the Center and in the Erdahl-Cloyd annex are a wide variety of food service 
facilities including a cafeteria, two snack bars, a delicatessen, ice cream bar, buf- 
fet cria and salad bar. 

THOMPSON THEATRE 

Thompson Theatre is a student oriented theatre with an emphasis on flexibility 
and experimentation. Each production is open to all NCSU students, whether 
experienced or not, as actors, technicians, crew members and directors. 

The physical elements of the theatre are flexible, with seating, walls and 
staging that can be arranged in a variety of combinations to form any kind of 
theatre from proscenium to in-the-round. 

Two types of productions are presented each year. The "Majors" are directed 
and produced by the professional theatre staff. Experimental Studio Theatre 
productions are completely produced bv students under the guidance and super- 
vision of the professional staff. 

Thompson Theatre works closely with the Department of Speech- Communica- 
tion which offers some courses for those interested in theatre. 

The University Players is the student organization within the threatre which 
recommends theatre operating policies and helps to determine the threatre's 
program. 



40 



STEWART THEATRE 

Stewart Theatre, located in the University Student Center, offers an opportunity 
for students and other members of the University community to see and hear the 
best in professional performances: plays, jazz, pops, folk and chamber music con- 
certs, both modern dance and ballet, films and lectures. The theatre also sponsors 
a series of musicals at Memorial Auditorium in downtown Raleigh. Special rates 
are available to NCSU students. 

CRAFTS CENTER 

Located on the ground floor of the Thompson building is one of the finest crafts 
facilities on a university campus in the southeast. Instruction is offered in 
ceramics, woodworking, photography, textile design, weaving and a host of other 
crafts. The facilities are also available for independent work. The Crafts Center 
is open vear-round. Supplies for most crafts can be purchased at the Center. 

Centralized. Computational 
Resources 

North Carolina State University is one of three universities owning the Triangle 
Universities Computation Center (TUCC) located in Research Triangle Park near 
Raleigh. Other participating institutions are the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill and Duke University at Durham. 

Central equipment located at TUCC is an IBM System 370 Model 165 with 4.0 
million characters of memory. In addition, more than 225 million characters of 
disk storage are available as well as extensive teleprocessing equipment for com- 
munication with member universities and other institutions throughout the State. 
A Hewlett Packard HP 2000 System provides an interactive service using the 
BASIC language. There is planned for addition in early 1977 an IBM Model 
165-2 with 2 million characters of memory. 

Each university has one high-speed terminal and many medium and low-speed 
devices in key places on campus for communication with TUCC. 

The principal computer on the N. C. State campus is an IBM 370 Model 135. 
It provides high-speed communication with TUCC and simultaneously processes 
administrative data processing applications. Other terminals include several 
medium-speed facilities and many typewriter-like and cathode ray tube devices 
used for faculty and student research and for instruction in credit and noncredit 
courses. Each of the eight schools and an increasing number of departments 
utilize these facilities as an important tool in the total educational process. 

The University Systems Analysis and Control Center provides centralized com- 
puting facilities for data acquisition, control and simulation built around an IBM 
System 7. The center maintains a versatile hybrid facility for faculty and student 
use. There are 17 hybrid simulation terminals for instruction. A GT 11-40 is 
available for graphics, research and instruction. Various mini-computers, small 
analog computers, and a microprocessor laboratory are available for instruction 
and research. 



41 



University Calendar 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1977 



January 


10 


Mon. 


January 


11 


Tues. 


January 


12 


Wed. 


January 


26 


Wed. 


February 


9 


Wed. 


March 


4 


Fri. 


March 


14 


Mon. 


March 


18 


Fri. 


April 


11 


Mon. 


April 


29 


Fri. 


April 


30- 




May 


1 


Sat.-Sun. 


May £ 


Ml 


Mon.-Sat. 
Mon.-Wed, 


May 


14 


Sat. 


SUMMER SESSION, 1977 


First Session 




May 


24 


Tues. 


May 


25 


Wed. 


May 


30 


Mon. 



June 



June 



10 



Fri. 



Fri. 



June 


28 


Tues. 


June 


29 


Wed. 


Second Session 




July 


5 


Tues. 


July 


6 


Wed. 


July 


11 


Mon. 


July 


15 


Fri. 


July 


22 


Fri. 


August 


9 


Tues. 


August 


10 


Wed. 


FALL SEMESTER, 197 


August 


25 


Thurs. 


August 


26 


Fri. 


August 


29 


Mon. 


September 


• 5 


Mon. 


September 12 


Mon. 


September 26 


Mon. 


42 







Registration Day 

Change Day (Late registration, Drop/Add) 
First day of classes 

Last day to add a course and last day to with- 
draw (or drop a course) with a refund 
Last day to drop a course at 400 level or below 
without a grade 

Mid-semester reports due; spring vacation be- 
gins at 10:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 
without a grade 
Holiday 
Last day of classes 

Reading days 

Final examinations 
Commencement 



Registration Day 

First day of classes 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw 

(or drop a course) with a refund 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 

below without a grade 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 

without a grade 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



Registration Day 

First day of classes 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw 

(or drop a course) with refund 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 

below without a grade 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 

without a grade 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



Registration Day 

Change Day (Late registration, Drop/ Add) 
First day of classes 
Holiday 

Last day to add a course and last day to with- 
draw (or drop a course) with a refund 
Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade 



October 14 


Fri. 


October 14 


Pri. 


October 19 


Wed. 


October 28 


Fri. 


November 23 


Wed. 


November 28 


Mon. 


December 9 


Fri. 


December 10- 




11 


Sat.-Sun. 


December 12- 


Mon.-Sat. 


21 


Mon.-Wed 


SPRING SEMESTER, 197$ 


January 9 


Mon. 


January 10 


Tues. 


January 11 


Wed. 


January 25 


Wed. 



February 8 Wed. 
March 3 Fri. 



March 


13 


Mon. 


March 


18 


Fri. 


March 


27 


Mon. 


April 


28 


Fri. 


April 


29-30 


Sat.-Sun. 


May 


1-10 


Mon.-Sat. 
Mon.-Wed. 


May 


13 


Sat. 


SUMMER SESSIONS, 1978 


First Session 




May 


23 


Tues. 


May 


24 


Wed. 


May 


29 


Mon. 



June 



June 



10 



Fri. 



Fri. 



June 
June 


27 
28 


Tues. 
Wed. 


Second Session 




July 
July 
July 


5 

6 

11 


Wed. 

Thurs. 

Tues. 


July 


17 


Mon. 


July 


22 


Fri. 


August 
August 


9 
10 


Wed. 
Thurs. 



Mid-semester reports due 

Fall vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 

without a grade 

Thanksgiving vacation begins at 1:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day of classes 

Reading days 

Final examinations 



Registration Day 

Change Day (Late registration, Drop/Add) 
First day of classes 

Last day to add a course and last day to with- 
draw (or drop a course) with a refund 
Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade 

Mid-semester reports due; spring vacation be- 
gins at 10:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 
without a grade 
Holiday 

Last day of classes 
Reading days 

Final examinations 
Commencement 



Registration Day 

First day of classes 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw 

(or drop a course) with a refund 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 

below without a grade 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 

without a grade 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



Registration Day 

First day of classes 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw 

(or drop a course) with a refund 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 

below without a grade 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 

without a grade 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



43 



FALL SEMESTER, 1978 



August 24 


Thurs. 


August 25 


Fri. 


August 28 


Mon. 


September 4 


Mon. 


September 11 


Mon. 


September 25 


Mon. 


October 13 


Fri. 


October 13 


Fri. 


October 18 


Wed. 


October 27 


Fri. 


November 22 


Wed. 


November 27 


Mon. 


December 8 


Fri. 


December 9- 




10 


Sat.-Sun. 


December 11- 


Mon.-Sat. 


20 


Mon.-Wed 



Registration Day 

Change Day (Late registration, Drop/Add) 
First day of classes 
Holiday 

Last day to add a course and last day to with- 
draw (or drop a course) with a refund 
Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade 
Mid-semester reports due 
Fall vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 
without a grade 

Thanksgiving Vacation begins at 1:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 
Last day of classes 

Reading days 
Final examinations 



44 



SCHOOLS AND 
PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

There are eight major undergraduate academic divisions at North Carolina State 
University. These are the Schools of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Design, Educa- 
tion, Engineering, Forest Resources, Liberal Arts, Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences and Textiles. The programs of study are outlined by school. Information 
concerning specific courses is given in the section of the catalog on course descrip- 
tions. 

In addition to information about the schools, this section contains descriptions of 
the military training program (ROTC), the Graduate School, University Studies, 
Continuing Education and Summer Sessions. 

Throughout the programs of study given in this section, departmental codes, 
course numbers and course titles are used. The key to the departmental code follows. 
This key will aid in locating individual courses in the course description section. 



Code 


Name 


AC & ALS 


Agriculture and Life Sciences 




(General Courses) 


ACC 


Accounting 


ANS 


Animal Science 


ANT 


Anthropology 


ARC 


Architecture 


ART 


Art 


AS 


Aerospace Studies (ROTC) 


BAE 


Biological and Agricultural 




Engineering 


BCH 


Biochemistry 


BMA 


Biomat hematics 


BO 


Botany 


BS 


Biological Sciences 


CE 


Civil Engineering 


CH 


Chemistry 


CHE 


Chemical Engineering 


CS 


Crop Science 


CSC 


Computer Science 


DF, DN 


Design 


E 


Engineering (General Courses) 


EB 


Economics 


ED 


Education (General Courses)* 


EE 


Electrical Engineering 


EH 


Engineering Honors 


ENG 


English 


ENT 


Entomology 


EO 


Engineering Operations 


ESM 


Engineering Science and 




Mechanics 


FL 


Foreign Languages 


FLE 


Foreign Language — English 


FLF 


Foreign Language — French 


FLG 


Foreign Language — German 


FLI 


Foreign Language — Italian 


FLP 


Foreign Language — Portuguese 


FLR 


Foreign Language — Russian 


FLS 


Foreign Language — Spanish 


FOR 


Forest Resources** 


FS 


Food Science 


GN 


Genetics 


GRK 


Greek 


GY 


Geology 


HI 


History 


HS 


Horticultural Science 


IA 


Industrial Arts 


IE 


Industrial Engineering 



* This includes courses offered by all departments and progr 
except industrial arts and psychology which are coded separately 
** This includes conservation and forestry. 



Code 


Name 


ISO 


Inteinational Student 




Orientation 


LA 


Liberal Arts 


LAR 


Landscape Architecture 


LAT 


Latin 


MA 


Mathematics 


MAE 


Mechanical and Aerospace Engi 




neering 


MAS 


Marine Sciences 


MAT 


Materials Engineering 


MB 


Microbiology 


MS 


Military Science (ROTC) 


MUS 


Music 


MY 


Meteorology 


NE 


Nuclear Engineering 


NTR 


Nutrition 


OR 


Operations Research 


OY 


Physical Oceanography 


PD 


Product Design 


PE 


Physical Education 


PHI 


Philosophy 


PHY 


Physiology 


PM 


Pest Management 


PO 


Poultry Science 


PP 


Plant Pathology 


PS 


Political Science 


PSY 


Psychology 


PVD 


Visual Design 


PY 


Physics 


REL 


Religion 


RRA 


Recreation Resources 




Administration 


SOC 


Scoiology 


SP 


Speech 


ssc 


Soil Science 


ST 


Statistics 


SW 


Social Work 


T 


Textiles (General Courses) 


TC 


Textile Chemistry 


TOX 


Toxicology 


TX 


Textile Technology 


UNI 


University Studies 


VET 


Veterinary Science 


WPS 


Wood and Paper Science 




and Technology 


ZO 


Zoology 


~td pro( 


(rams within the School of Education 



45 



AGRICULTURE AND 
LIFE SCIENCES 

Patterson Hall 

J. E. Legates, Dean 

E. W. Glazener, Associate Dean and Director of Academic Affairs 

Modern agriculture is a complex industry built on the principles of science and 
business. The basic sciences are the foundations for modern agricultural technology. 
These sciences applied to understanding the functions of living material offer a 
background as preparation for a professional agriculturist, environmentalist, or as 
a preparatory program for the medical and health-related sciences. Likewise, the 
principles of economics and sociology provide background preparation for agri- 
cultural business management and public service aspects of society. 

The objects of the academic program are: 

1) To provide an opportunity for a broad university education 

2) To provide a variety of learning experiences 

3) To offer a choice of specialization, sufficient for initial employment 

4) To provide background for graduate or professional programs 

A high percentage of all the gainfully employed persons in the United States are 
engaged in operations directly or indirectly related to food and fiber. For example, 
the food industry ranges from those who produce the food, supply material to the 
producer, and process the finished product to those who sell the products to the 
consumer. Hundreds of distinct occupations are represented in modern agriculture 
and biology. About 30 percent of the graduates elect to continue their education in 
graduate and professional schools. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Students in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences have ample opportunities 
to take part in broadening extracurricular activities. Most departments have stu- 
dent organizations which provide professional as well as social experience. Repre- 
sentatives of these clubs form the Agri-Life Council. This council is the student 
organization representing the school. Student tours provide an opportunity to see 
firsthand the application of classroom principles. In addition, students representing 
agronomy, animal science, horticultural science, food science, poultry science and 
soil science compete regionally and nationally in a number of activities providing 
student members a chance to learn by travel as well as by participation. 

CURRICULA OFFERINGS AND REQUIREMENTS 

A freshman enrolling in agriculture and life sciences has a common core of 
courses the first year, courses that are appropriate in all curricula. This method 
allows the student time to study various programs before selecting a curriculum. In 
addition to the basic courses in English, biology, and physical and social sciences, 
the student selects a major in a department, an interdisciplinary program or an 
individualized course plan. 

Departmental majors are offered in three general curricula as follows: 

Science — agricultural economics, animal science, biological and agricultural 
engineering (joint program with the School of Engineering), botany, crop science, 
entomology, food science, horticultural science, medical technology, poultry science, 
rural sociology, soil science, wildlife biology and zoology. Premedical sciences are 
offered in this curriculum. 

Business — emphasis on economics, combination programs in technology in animal 
science, horticultural science and poultry science. 

Technology — biological and agricultural engineering, animal science, food sci- 
ence, horticultural science and poultry science. 

Interdepartmental and Interdisciplinary Programs — These curricula offer the 
opportunity to select broad curriculum majors that involve two or more departments 
or schools: 

47 



Biological Sciences — A curriculum with emphasis on biological and physical 
sciences, especially designed for graduate or professional courses requiring a 
biology background. 

Conservation — A curriculum concentrating on the use, preservation and improve- 
ment of natural resources. Administered jointly by the School of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences and the School of Forest Resources. 

Pest Management (for Crop Protection) — A curriculum with emphasis on the 
application of chemical and biological principles in the control of plant diseases, 
insects and weeds. The curriculum is administered by the Departments of Crop 
Science, Entomology, Horticultural Science and Plant Pathology. 

Agronomy — A technical curriculum dealing with the fundamentals of crop pro- 
duction and soil management. The curriculum is administered by the Departments 
of Crop Science and Soil Science. 

Individualized Study Program— A curriculum planned by the student with the 
assistance of a faculty advisory committee. 

In addition to these cited curricula, a number of arrangements are available that 
provide the student an opportunity to select areas of course concentration. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The School of Agriculture and Life Sciences has a comprehensive Honors Pro- 
gram for qualified freshmen and sophomores interested in participating in seminar 
discussion programs on broad topics. These sessions are led by outstanding 
professors. 

Qualified juniors and seniors have an opportunity to participate in an indepen- 
dent research program. Faculty direction is provided on an individual basis to each 
student. The student has the opportunity to select his project. 

INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS 

An International Seminar is offered to interested students. In addition, an Inter- 
national Option, requiring modern language and 12 semester hours of appropriate 
courses in the social sciences, is available for students enrolled in any curricula. 

DEGREES 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred upon the satisfactory completion of 
one of the curricula in this school. 

The degrees of Master of Science, Master of Agriculture and Master of Life 
Sciences are offered in the various departments in the School. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in the following subject areas: animal 
science, biochemistry, biological and agricultural engineering, botany, crop science, 
economics, entomology, food science, genetics, horticultural science, marine sci- 
ences, microbiology, nutrition, physiology, plant pathology, sociology, soil science, 
and zoology. 

Further information on graduate offerings may be found in the Graduate Catalog. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Broad and fascinating opportunities in business, industry, education and govern- 
ment are open to graduates of this school. Some of the areas in which graduates 
are employed are as follows: 

Busiyiess and Industry — banking and credit, insurance, farm management, coop- 
ratives, land appraisal, marketing, transportation, food chains, food processing 
and distribution, machinery and equipment, chemicals, fertilizer, feed manufactur- 
ing, seed improvement. 

Communications — writing, reporting, radio, television, newspapers, magazines, 
advertising, publications. 

Conservation — soil, water, range, forest, fish, wildlife parks, recreation. 

Education — high school and college instruction in agriculture, biology, agri- 
cultural extension, governmental and industrial agencies. 

Farming and Ranching (agricultural production) — general livestock, field crops, 
fruits, vegetables, poultry, ornamentals. 

48 



Pre professional and Graduate Preparation — premedical programs for training 
for medical, dental and veterinary colleges; graduate programs. 

Research — production, marketing, engineering, processing, biological sciences, 
conservation, organizational structure, group behavior. 

Services — inspection and regulation, production field service, health services, 
environmental quality, product standards, grading, agricultural technology and 
consulting. 

A placement office, coordinated with the University Career Planning and Place- 
ment Center, is maintained to assist graduates in career development and place- 
ment. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

The curricula in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences have a common 
freshman year with the exception of the science program in biological and agri- 
cultural engineering. For the science curricula in biological and agricultural engi- 
neering freshman year, see freshman year in the School of Engineering. 



Fall Semester 



Credit 8 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

BS 100 General Biology or CH 101 

General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective .... 3 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry* 4 

Physical Education 1 

(Military Science or Air Science may 
be elected) 



16 



ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

or 
MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathematics 

with Applications 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective ... 3 
CH 101 General Chemistry I or CH 107 
Principles of Chemistry 
or 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Physical Education 1 

(Military Science or Air Science may 
be elected) 

14-15 



* Does not contribute to the 130 semester hours required in the biological sciences curriculum. 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES 

Science, business and technology are three curricula offered in this school. All 
departments offer the science curriculum. Several departments offer the choice of 
either science or technology. In addition, several departments are participating in 
interdisciplinary programs. 

A business curriculum is offered in agricultural economics. Combinations in busi- 
ness and technology are offered in animal science, horticultural science and poultry 
science. Double majors between agricultural economics and other subject areas may 
be arranged. 

All the curricula have a core of required courses on a school basis. Courses pecul- 
iar to a specific department are listed under the departmental requirements. Listed 
on the following pages are the required courses by curriculum on a school basis. 



* Group A includes the physical and biological sciences; Group B, economics and business manage- 
lent; Group C. applied science and technology; Group D, social sciences and humanities. 



Science 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS ... 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric ... 3 
ENG 112 Composition and Reading ... 3 
Electives (English or Modern Language) 6 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 Credits) 

Electives from Group D 21 



Physical and Biological Sciences 
(28-32 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Biological Sciences Elective 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry ... 4 
MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

or 
MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathe- 
matics with Applications .... 3 

49 



PY 221 College Physics 5 

or 
PY 211. PY 212 General Physics 8 

Elective* (60-6i Credits) 

Restricted Electives from Group A 22-26 

Departmental Requirements and 

Electives 26 

Free Electives 12 

Subtotal 126 

Physical Education 4 

Hours Required for Graduation 130** 

Business 

Accounting Credits 

ACC 260 Accounting I — Concepts 

of Financial Reporting 3 

ACC 261 Accounting II — Financial 

Information Systems 3 

ACC 262 Managerial Uses of Cost Data 3 
ACC 360 Financial Reporting Theory 

& Practice I 3 

ACC 361 Financial Reporting Theory 

& Practice II 3 

ACC 362 Production Cost Analysis 

& Control 3 

ACC 460 Specialized Financial 

Reporting Theory & 

Practice 3 

ACC 464 Income Taxation 3 

ACC 466 Examination of Financial 

Statements 3 



ACC 46K Professional Accountancy 

Resume 3 

Production : 

EB 303 Farm Management 3 

EB 325 Industrial Management 3 

EB 551 Agricultural Production 

Economics 3 

Marketing: 

EB 311 Agricultural Markets 3 

EB 313 Marketing Methods 3 

EB 521 Markets and Trade 3 

Finance: 

EB 304 Financial Institutions 3 

EB 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance . 3 
EB 420 Corporation Finance 3 

Person in /. 

EB 326 Personnel Management 3 

EB 332 Industrial Relations 3 

EB 431 Labor Economics 3 

Business Management : 

EB 310 Economics of the Firm 3 

EB 525 Management Policy and 

Decision Making 3 

Electives: 

EB 301 Production and Prices 3 

EB 302 Aggregate Economic Analysis: 

Theory and Policy 3 

Group B Courses 



Students in the business curriculum complete a minimum of 24 semester hours 
in Group B courses. One course is required in the areas of accounting, production, 
marketing, finance and personnel. In addition, three courses are elected from 
Group B course offerings. 

Technology 



Credits 

ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS . . 1 

language (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric ... 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading ... 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Electives (English or Modern Language) 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 Credits) 

Electives from Group D 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(St-SS Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Biological Sciences Elective 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 



CH 107 
MA 111 



Principles of Chemistry 4 

Algebra and Trigonometry ... 4 



Analytic Geometry and 
Calculus A 



MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathe- 
matics with Applications 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

Electives (59-60 Credits) 
Restricted Electives from Groups 

A, B or C 20-21 

Departmental Requirements and 

Electives 27 

Free Electives 12 



Subtotal 126 

Physical Education 4 



Hours Required for Graduation 130** 



** All curricula require the completion of one course in literature. 



50 



ELECTIVES 

The following lists provide typical courses that are elected from the four block 
groupings — A, B, C and D. Additional courses may be selected by checking with the 
office of the Director of Academic Affairs. 



Group A 

PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Animal Science 

ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology 

ANS 405 Lactation 

ANS (NTR, PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition 

ANS (NTR) 416 Quantitative Nutrition 

ANS (PHY) 502 Reproductive Physiology of 

Vertebrates 
ANS (GN) 508 Genetics of Animal Improve- 
ment 
ANS (PHY) 580 Mammalian Endocrine Physi- 
ology 

Biochemistry* 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 



BCH 352 Elementary Biochemistry Laboratory 
BCH 551 General Biochemistry 
BCH 552 Experimental Biochemistry 
BCH (PHY) 553 Physiological Biochemistry 
BCH 554 Radioisotope Techniques in Biology 
BCH (GN, MB) 561 Biochemical and Micro- 
bial Genetics 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

BAE 303 Energy Conversion in Biological 
Systems 

Biological Sciences 

All courses listed with the BS designation. 

Biomathematics* 
All Courses 

Botany 

BO 200 Plant Life 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 

BO 400 Plant Diversity 

BO (CS) 402 Economic Botany 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 

BO (ZO) 414 Cell Biology 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 

BO 480 Air Pollution Biology 

BO (MB) 574 Phycology 

BO (MB. PP) 575 The Fungi 

BO (MB, PP) 576 The Fungi-Laboratory 

Chemistry* 
All Courses 

Computer Science* 
All Courses 

Crop Science 

CS (BO) 402 Economic Botany 

Entomology 

ENG 301 Introduction to Forest Insects 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic Insects 

ENT 502 Insect Diversity 

ENT 503 Functional Systems of Insects 



Food Science 

FS 331 Food Engineering 

FS 402 Food Chemistry 

FS (MB) 405 Food Microbiology 

FS 503 Food Analysis 

FS 504 Food Proteins and Enzymes 

FS 506 Advanced Food Microbiology 



Forestry 
FOR 273 



Quantitative Methods in Forest Re- 
sources 



Geosciences* 
All Courses 

Genetics 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 
GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory 
GN 504 Human Genetics 

GN (ANS) 508 Genetics of Animal Improve- 
ment 
GN (ZO) 532 Biological Effects of Radiations 
GN (ZO) 540 Evolution 
GN (ZO) 550 Experimental Evolution 
GN (BCH, MB) 561 Biochemical and Micro- 
bial Genetics 

Mathematics* 
All Courses 

Meteorology* 
All Courses 

Microbiology 

MB 401 General Microbiology 

MB (FS) 405 Food Microbiology 

MB 501 Advanced Microbiology 

MB 511 Bacterial Pathogenesis 

MB 514 Microbial Metabolism 

MB 521 Microbial Ecology 

MB 551 Immunology and Serology 

MB (BCH, GN) 561 Biocehmical and Micro- 
bial Genetics 

MB 571 Virology 

MB (BO) 574 Phycology 

MB (BO. PP) 575 The Fungi 

MB (BO, PP) 576 The Fungi-Laboratory 

Nutrition 

NTR (ANS, PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition 
NTR (ANS) 416 Quantitative Nutrition 

Physics* 
All Courses 

Physiology 

PHY (ANS) 502 Reproductive Physiology of 

Vertebrates 
PHY (BCH) 553 Physiological Biochemistry 
PHY (ANS) 580 Mammalian Endocrine Phys- 
iology 



51 



Plant Pathology 

PP (BO, MB) 575 
PP (BO. MB) 576 



The Fungi 

The Fungi-Laboratory 



Poultry Science 

PO 405 Avian Physiology 

PO (ANS, NTR) 415 Comparative Nutrition 

PO (ZO) 524 Comparative Endocrinology 

Soil Science* 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

SSC 511 Soil Physics 

SSC 520 Soil and Plant Analysis 

SSC 522 Soil Chemistry 

Statistics* 

All Courses 



Zoology 

ZO 201 
ZO 202 



General Zoology 
Invertebrate Zoology 



ZO 203 

ZO 212 

ZO 315 

ZO 323 

ZO 345 

ZO (BO) 

ZO 361 

ZO (BO) 

ZO 415 

ZO 420 

ZO 421 

ZO 441 

ZO 442 

ZO 510 

ZO 513 

ZO 515 

ZO 517 

ZO (PO) 

ZO (GN) 

ZO (GN) 

ZO (GN) 



Vertebrate Zoology 
Basic Anatomy and Physiology 
General Parasitology 
Comparative Anatomy 
Histology 

360 Introduction to Ecology 
Vertebrate Embryology 
414 Cell Biology 

Cellular and Animal Physiology Lab- 
oratory 

Fishery Science 
Vertebrate Physiology 
Ichthyology 

Ichthyology Laboratory 
Adaptive Behavior of Animals 
Comparative Physiology 
Growth and Reproduction of Fishes 
Population Ecology 
524 Comparative Endocrinology 
532 Biological Effects of Radiations 
".540 Evolution 
550 Experimental Evolution 



Courses in these blocks are considered Physical Sciences. 



Group B 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 



Accounting 

ACC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of Financial 
Reporting 

ACC 261 Accounting II — Financial Informa- 
tion Systems 

ACC 262 Managerial Uses of Cost Data 

ACC 360 Financial Reporting Theory and 
Practice I 

ACC 361 Financial Reporting Theory and 
Practice II 

ACC 362 Production Cost Analysis and Con- 
trol 

ACC 460 Specialized Financial Reporting 
Theory and Practice 

ACC 464 Income Taxation 

ACC 466 Examination of Financial Statements 

ACC 468 Professional Accountancy Resume 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 
BAE 461 Analysis of Agricultural System 

Economics and Business 

EB 301 Production and Prices 
EB 302 Aggregate Economic Analysis: Theory 
and Policy 



Farm Management 
Financial Institutions 
Business Law I 
Business Law II 
Economics of the Firm 
Agricultural Markets 
Marketing Methods 
Industrial Management 
Personnel Management 
Industrial Relations 
350 Economics and Business Statis- 
tics 
Farm Appraisal and Finance 
Corporation Finance 
Agricultural Price Analysis 



Mathematics 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance 

Statistics 

ST (EB) 350 Economics and Business Sta- 
tistics 



EB 


303 


EB 


304 


EB 


307 


EB 


308 


EB 


310 


EB 


311 


EB 


313 


EB 


325 


EB 


326 


EB 


332 


EB 


(ST) 


EB 


415 


EB 


420 


EB 


430 



Group C 

APPLIED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Agricultural Communications 

AC 311 Communication Methods and Media 

Animal Science 

Introduction to Animal Science 

Livestock Feeds and Feeding 

NTR) 301 Nutrition and Man 

Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals 

Advanced Selection Dairy and Meat 

Animals 

Beef Cattle Management 

Swine Management 

Dairy Cattle Management 

Sheep Management 

409 Meat and Meat Products 

52 



ANS 


200 


ANS 


204 


ANS 


(FS. 


ANS 


302 


ANS 


308 


ANS 


402 


ANS 


403 


ANS 


404 


ANS 


406 


ANS 


(FS) 



ANS 410 Horse Management 

ANS 411 Breeding and Improvement of Do- 
mestic Animals 

ANS (VET) 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 

ANS 520 Tropical Livestock Production 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

BAE 201 Shop Practices 

BAE 211 Farm Machinery 

BAE (SSC) 321 Water Management 

BAE 332 Farm Structures 

BAE 341 Farm Electrifications and Utilities 

BAE 411 Farm Power and Machinery 

BAE 433 Processing Agricultural Products 



BAE (SSC) 471 Agricultural Water Manage- 
ment 
BAE (CE) 578 Agricultural Waste Manage- 
ment 

Civil Engineering 

CE (BAE) 578 Agricultural Waste Manage- 
ment 

Crop Science 

CS 211 Crop Science 

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory 

CS 312 Pastures and Forage Crops 

CS 315 Turf Management 

CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop Pro- 
duction 

CS 413 Plant Breeding 

CS 414 Weed Science 

CS (SSC) 462 Soil-Crop Management Systems 

CS 511 Tobacco Technology 

CS 513 Physiological Aspects of Crop Produc- 
tion 

CS (HS) 514 Principles and Methods in Weed 
Science 

Entomology 

ENT 201 Insects and Man 
ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect Control 
ENT 562 Agricultural Entomology 
ENT (ZO) 582 Medical and Veterinary En- 
tomology 

Food Science 

FS 201 Food Science and Man's Food 

FS (ANS, NTR) 301 Nutrition and Man 

FS 400 Foods and Nutrition 

FS (PO) 404 Poultry Products 

FS (ANS) 409 Meat and Meat Products 

Genetics 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 
GN (PO) 520 Poultry Breeding 

Horticultural Science 

HS 101 Plants for Home and Pleasure 

HS 201 Principles of Horticulture 

HS 301 Plant Propagation 

HS 342 Landscape Horticulture 

HS 411 Nursery Management 

HS 421 Tree Fruit Production 

HS 432 Vegetable Production 

HS 441 Floriculture I 

HS 442 Floriculture II 



HS 471 Arboriculture 

HS (CS) 514 Principles and Methods in Weed 
Science 

Nutrition 

NTR (ANS, FS) 301 Nutrition and Man 

Pest Management 

PM 415 Principles of Pest Management 

Plant Pathology 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 

PP 318 Forest Pathology 

PP 450 Nematode Diseases of Plants and 

Their Control 
PP 500 Plant Disease Control 

Poultry Science 

PO 201 Poultry Science and Production 

PO 301 Evaluation of Live Poultry 

PO 351 Grading and Evaluation of Poultry 

Products 
PO (VET) 401 Poultry Diseases 
PO 402 Commercial Poultry Enterprises 
PO (FS) 404 Poultry Products 
PO 410 Production and Management of Game 

Birds in Confinement 
PO (GN) 520 Poultry Breeding 

Soil Science 

SSC 205 Soils as a Natural Resource 

SSC (BAE) 321 Water Management 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

SSC 352 Soil Classification 

SSC 461 Soil Physical Properties and Plant 

Growth 
SSC (CS) 462 Soil-Crop Management Systems 
SSC (BAE) 471 Agricultural Water Manage- 
ment 
SSC 472 Forest Soils 

Veterinary Science 

VET 300 Laboratory Animal Management 

VET (PO) 401 Poultry Diseases 

VET (ANS) 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 

Zoology 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural Resources 
ZO 353 Wildlife Management 
ZO 400 Biological Basis of Man's Environ- 
ment 
ZO (ENT) 582 Medical and Veterinary Ento- 
mology 



Group D 

SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES 

The student is required to complete 21 semester hours of Group D courses in all 
degree programs. Not more than six semester hours are to come from one depart- 
ment. It is strongly recommended that the student be exposed to courses in each of 
the major course areas outlined below, although the final selection is with the stu- 
dent and his adviser. 



AREA I 

Anthropology 
All Courses 

Economics 

EB 201 Economics I 

EB 202 Economics II 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 



EB (HI) 370 The Rise of Industrialism 

EB (HI) 371 Evolution of the American Econ- 
omy 

EB 401 Economic Analysis for Nonmajors 

EB 410 Public Finance 

EB 413 Competition, Monopoly and Public 
Policy 

EB 422 Investments and Portfolio Manage- 
ment 

EB 431 Labor Economics 

53 



EB 435 Urban Economics 

EB 436 Environmental Economics 

EB 442 Evolution of Economic Ideas 

EB 448 International Economics 

EB 475 Comparative Economic Systems 

Psychology, Sociology 
All Courses 

AREA II 

History. Political Science. University Studies 
All Courses 



AREA III 



Courses that relate to the appreciation and his- 
tory of art. 

English 

Literature Courses Only 

Foreign Language, Music 
Courses numbered 200 and above 

Philosophy, Religion 
All Courses 



Adult and Community College Education 

(See Education.) 

The adult and community college education faculty offers instruction primarily 
at the graduate level. The department is jointly administered by the Schools of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences and Education. For details, see Education, pages 97. 



Agronomy 

Students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree under the technology curriculum 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences with a major in agronomy. The agronomy option 
is administered jointly by the Departments of Crop Science and Soil Science. For 
further information, see crop science, page 63, or soil science, page 79. 

CURRICULUM IN CROP SCIENCE AND SOIL SCIENCE 

TECHNOLOGY (AGRONOMY) PROGRAM 



Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS .... 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 Credits) 

Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(S2-SS Credits) 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 4 

or 
MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathe- 
matics with Applications 3 



CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 4 

Free Electives 
Free Electives 12 



Group A, B.C. Courses 
(19-20 Credits) 



CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry ... 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

PP 3 15 Plant Diseases 3 

Electives in A, B, or C Courses 9-10 



Animal Science 

Polk Hall 

Professor C. A. Lassiter, Head of the Department 
Professor R. M. Myers, Coordinator of Advising 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: E. R. Barrick, A. J. Clawson, D. G. Davenport. E. J. Eisen, L. Goode, J. M. Leatherwood, 
J. G. Lecce, J. E. Legates. B. T. McDaniel, R. D. Mochrie, R. M. Myers, I. D. Porterfield, A. H. 



54 



Rakes, H. A. Ramsey, O. W. Robison. H. A. Schneider, L. C. Ulberg; Professors Emeriti: F. H. 
Smith, H. A. Stewart, G. H. Wise; Associate Professors: E. V. Caruolo, E. U. Dillard, R. W. 
Harvey, B. H. Johnson, W. L. Johnson, E. E. Jones, J. J. McNeill, J. C. Wilk; Assistant Professor: 
W. D. Armstrong; Adjunct Assistant Professor: B. D. Harrington; Associate Members of the 
Faculty: S. B. Tove (Biochemistry); C. H. Hill (Poultry Science); E. G. Batte, D. J. Moncol (Veteri- 
nary Science) 

EXTENSION 

Professor J. W. Patterson, In Charge, Animal Husbandry Extension 
Professor M. E. Senger, In Charge, Dairy Husbandry Extension 
Professor D. G. Spruill, In Charge, Swine Husbandry Extension 

Professors: R. F. Behlow, T. C. Blalock, G. Hyatt Jr., G. S. Parsons, F. D. Sargent, J. R. Woodard; 
Extension Professors Emeriti: A. V. Allen, J. S. Buchanan; Associate Professors: J. R. Jones, F. N. 
Knott. C. M. Stanislaw, D. P. Wesen; Assistant Professors: K. R. Butcher, T. M. Leonard, D. G. 
Levis, J. M. Tibbs; Assistant Professor Emeritus: R. R. Rich; Extension Specialists: B. C. Allison, 
J. K. Butler. J. W. Parker. E. B. Shankle II, H. W. Webster III; Extension Specialist Emeriti: 
J. A. Arey. R. L. Wynne 

Undergraduate students study subjects related to various phases of animal indus- 
try. Training is provided in nutrition, physiology, breeding and disease and there 
are opportunities for the application of basic scientific training in the husbandry 
areas. Options for course selection by each student make it possible for those with 
varying backgrounds and wide-ranging interests to become involved in stimulating 
and rewarding training. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities for animal science majors include farm, dairy and livestock manage- 
ment careers, jobs as fieldmen for breed association and livestock organizations, 
agricultural extension, education work in business and industries serving agricul- 
ture, meat grading, agricultural communications in animal science, feed manufac- 
turing, sales work in feeds and equipment, marketing dairy cattle and dairy 
products, and supervising livestock and farm loans with banks and lending agencies. 
Many students in veterinary science obtain degrees in animal science as well. 
Students may elect graduate study, after which they will find opportunities in 
teaching, research and development. See pages 12-13 for graduate degrees offered. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in animal science may be obtained 
under any of the three curricula offered in Agriculture and Life Sciences. For the 
basic requirements and freshman year see page 49. 

CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Language Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities (21 Credits) 
Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A or MA 114. Introduction to Finite Math 4 or 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 
or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

PY 221 College Physics or PY 211 & 212, General Physics 5 or 8 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

55 



Physical Education 
Physical Education 



Free Electivea 
Free Electives 12 

Group A, B, C Courses (26 or 27 Credits) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry 
or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Electives in A, B or C Courses 15 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science 4 

ANS 490 Animal Science Seminar 1 

Animal Science Electives as follows: 21 

A minimum of 9 credits from: 

ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology 3 

ANS 405 Lactation 3 

ANS 411 Breeding & Improvement of Domestic Animals 3 

ANS (NTR, PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition 3 

ANS (VET) 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 3 (9) 

Remaining from A & C Courses (12) * 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



* Dependent upon whether MA 112 or MA 114 and PY 221 or PY 211 & 212 were elected. 

CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

SP 23 1 Expository Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities (21 Credits) 

Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytical Geometry & Calculus A or MA 114, Introduction to Finite Math 4 or 3 

CH 101 Genera] Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 Genera] Chemistry II or CH 107, Principles of Chemistry 4 

PY 221 College Physics or PY 211 & 212, General Physics 5 or 8 

BS 100 Genera] Biology 4 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

Physical Education 
Physical Education 4 

Free Electives 

Free Electives 12 

Group A, B. C Courses (21 Credits) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

Electives in A, B, or C Courses 14 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (27 Credits) 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science 4 

ANS 204 Livestock Feeds and Feeding 3 

ANS 490 Animal Science Seminar 1 



56 



Animal Science Electives as follows: 
A minimum of 9 credits from : 

ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology 3 

ANS 405 Lactation 3 

ANS 411 Breeding and Improvement of Domestic Animals 3 

ANS (NTR. PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition 3 

ANS (VET) 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 3 (9) 

A minimum of 5 credits from : 

ANS 302 Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals 2 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management 3 

ANS 403 Swine Management 3 

ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management 3 

ANS 406 Sheep Management 3 

ANS 410 Horse Management 3 (5 or 6) 

Remaining from A & C Courses (5) * 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



* Dependent upon whether MA 112 or MA 114 or PY 221 or PY 211 & 212 were elected. 

BUSINESS PROGRAM 

All required courses in the Technology Program plus 24 hours in Economics and 
Business Management. (See page 56.) 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 

Biochemistry 

Polk Hall 

Professor S. B. Tove, Head of the Department 
Professor F. B. Armstrong, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: H. R. Horton, J. S. Kahn, I. S. Longmuir, A. R. Main; Associate Professors: J. A. Knopp, 
E. C. Sisler. E. C. Theil; Assistant Professor: W. L. Miller; Associate Members of the Faculty: 
E. E. Jones (Animal Science), L. W. Aurand, H. E. Swaisgood (Food Science), J. Bordner. W. P. 
Tucker (Chemistry) 

The Department of Biochemistry offers instruction at the undergraduate and 
graduate levels. Undergraduate courses provide students from a number of cur- 
ricula with a fundamental background in biochemistry. 

The graduate program trains scientists for research and teaching careers in 
biochemistry and related fields. For graduate degrees offered, see pages 12-13. 

Biochemistry is jointly administered by the Schools of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences and Physical and Mathematical Sciences. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The undergraduate curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Science degree in the 
biological sciences with an option in biochemistry. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES CURRICULUM (BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION) 

Orientation Credits 

ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric _ 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

FL Foreign Language 6 

Social Sciences and Humanities (21 Credits) 
Electives 21 

Mathematical Sciences (11-18 Credits)^ 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 

or MA 102* or Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 4 



57 



MA 212 Analytic Geometry and Calculus B 

or MA 201* or Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 3-4* 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathematics with Applications 

or MA 202* or Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 3-4* 

MA 301* Applied Differential Equations I 3* 

CSC, ST, or MA Elective in Computer Science. Statistics, or Mathematics 2-3 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 4 

Physical and Biological Sciences (6U-7S Credits)* 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 221. 223 Organic Chemistry I and II 4,4 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 

or CH 428* or Quantitative Organic Analysis 4 or 3* 

CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry 

or CH 431*. 433* or Physical Chemistry I and II 4 or 3*. 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

ZO 201 General Zoology 4 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 4 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 

or ZO 4 14 or Cell Biology 3-4 

or ZO 421 or Vertebrate Physiology 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

BCH 551* Genera] Biochemistry 3* 

BCH 352 Elementary Biochemistry Laboratory 

or BCH 552* or Experimental Biochemistry 2 or 3 * 

PY 211. 212 General Physics 4. 4 

or PY 205*. 208* General Physics or 4*, 4' 

MB 40 1 General Microbiology 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory 1 

ALS 499 Honors Student Research 

or BCH 490* or Special Studies in Biochemistry 3* 

Free Electives (Up to 15 Credits) 

Electi ves 0-15 



Hours Required for Graduation 130 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

(Also see Engineering.) 

David S. Weaver Laboratories 

Professor F. J. Hassler, Head of Department 
Professor G. B. Blum Jr., Coordinator of Advising 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: H. D. Bowen, G. B. Blum Jr.. J. W. Dickens (USDA), J. M. Fore, D. H. Howells. B. K. 
Huang, E. G. Humphries, W. H. Johnson, G. J. Kriz. W. F. McClure, C. W. Suggs. E. H. Wiser. 
J. H. Young; Professors Emeriti: G. W. Giles. J. W. Weaver Jr.; Associate Professors: G. R. 
Baughman. E. L. Howell, M. R. Overcash. R. P. Rohrbach. R. W. Skaggs. R. S. Sowell. T. B. 
Whitaker (USDA); Assistant Professors: C. F. Abrams Jr.. P. W. Westerman, D. H. Willits Jr.. 
D. W. Winter (USDA); Adjunct Asst. Professor: L. S. Rosenstein; Associate Members of the 
Faculty: D. D. Hamann, V. A. Jones (Food Science), A. E. Hassan (Forestry) 

EXTENSION 

Associate Professor: F. J. Humenik, Associate Head in Charge of Extension 

Professor Emeritus: H. M. Ellis; Associate Professors: E. O. Beasley. L. B. Driggers. J. W. Glover. 
R. E. Sneed, R. W. Watkins; Associate Professor Emeritus: J. C. Ferguson. W. C. Warrick; 
Assistant Professor: J. C. Barker; Visiting Assistant Professor: J. F. W. Schulze 



+ The grade "D" will not be accepted as a passing grade in any mathematics or science courses. 
* Courses required for the Honors Program in Biochemistry; recommended for students preparing for 
graduate study in Biochemistry. 

58 



Biological and agricultural engineering students train to deal with problems of 
agriculture that are engineering in nature. Scientific and engineering principles 
are applied to the conservation and utilization of water and soil, the development 
of power and labor-saving devices for all phases of agricultural production, the 
design of structures and equipment for housing and handling livestock and field 
products, and the processing and marketing of farm products. 

Two curricula are offered, technology and science, which are explained below. 
Science graduates receive a B.S. in biological and agricultural engineering. Tech- 
nology students receive the B.S. in agriculture. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates of the science curriculum are qualified for positions in design, develop- 
ment and research in public institutions and in industry, and for teaching and 
extension work in institutions of higher education. This curriculum, accredited 
by the Engineering Council for Professional Development, also provides adequate 
training for post-graduate work leading to advanced degrees. For information on 
graduate study, see pages 12-13. 

Those trained in agricultural engineering technology are qualified for positions 
in sales and service of agricultural equipment such as farm machinery, irrigation 
systems, etc.; as county agents or farmers; and for farm advisory work with such 
organizations as electric power companies. 

CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

The science curriculum develops young people capable of engineering leadership 
in agriculture. Emphasis is placed on basic science courses such as mathematics, 
physics, mechanics, biology, soils, and thermodynamics, which provide a sound 
background for engineering and agricultural technology. Courses are directed to 
those methods of thought and techniques whereby science can be applied with 
understanding and judgment to engineering situations related to agricultural 
operations. 

Since biological and agricultural engineering involves two distinct technical 
fields — agriculture and engineering — the science curriculum is a joint responsibility 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Engineering and is so administered. Under- 
graduate students in this curriculum may officially enroll in either school; duplicate 
undergraduate records are maintained in both schools. 

For the program in agricultural engineering science, refer to the freshman year 
in the School of Engineering and the curriculum as shown on pages 116-117. 

CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

The technology curriculum is for those who wish to work at the applied level in 
the agribusiness complex. Graduates are equipped to apply to the farm the new 
technology as developed and revealed by the professional agricultural engineer. 
The courses are presented and directed toward the solution of consumer problems 
with emphasis on the techniques employed. 

Listed below are the departmental requirements in the technology program. 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 



Credits Social Sciences and Humanities 

(tl Credits) 



ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Group D Electives . 18 

Languages (12 Credits) EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 , . .... . . „ . 

„ x ,„ ,,„/-. •*.• j u j- o Physical ana Biological Sciences 

ENG 112 Compositions and Reading 3 * ... _, " .. . 

on — . ™ •■ r. • , . « (23 or ti Credits) 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 



59 



MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathe- 
matics with Applications 3 

or 
MA 112 Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Biological Science Elective 4 

Physical Education (k Credits) 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education 3 

Free Electives (IS Credits) 
Free Electives 12 

Group A, B, C Courses 
(S7 or S6 Credits) 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

PY 212 General Physics 4 



CSC 200 Introduction to Computers and 

Their Uses 3 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

Management Elective 3 

Electives in A, B, or C courses 8 or 9 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(SO Credits) 

E 101 Engineering Graphics 2 

BAE 201 Shop Practices 2 

BAE 211 Farm Machinery 3 

BAE 321 Water Management 4 

BAE 341 Farm Electrification and 

Utilities 4 

BAE 433 Processing Agricultural 

Products 4 

BAE 461 Analysis of Agricultural 

Systems 3 

BAE 332 Farm Structures 3 

BAE 411 Farm Power and Machinery 3 

BAE 303 Energy Conversion in Biological 

Systems 2 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



Biological Sciences 

Gardner Hall 

Professor J. L. Apple, Assistant Director of Academic Affairs and Research for the 
Biological Sciences 

Professor C. F. Lytle, Coordinator of Advising 

The biological sciences curriculum is an interdepartmental program leading to a 
B.S. degree and designed for students desiring a comprehensive rather than a 
narrowly specialized education in the biological sciences. It is especially suitable 
for students preparing for graduate study in a specialized field of biology, for 
students planning to teach high school biology, and for students preparing for 
careers in business or industry. 

Experience indicates one of the best preparations for graduate study in biology is 
a broad training in the basic biological sciences supplemented with a strong back- 
ground in the physical and mathematical sciences. The biological sciences curricu- 
lum incorporates these features and provides the student with maximum flexibility 
and options for graduate specialization. 

Students may concentrate on a specific field in the biological sciences curriculum 
by selecting appropriate free and restricted elective courses in consultation with 
their advisers. Such programs within the biological sciences curriculum are avail- 
able to provide options in biochemistry, microbiology, and nutrition. Courses may be 
selected from the School of Education to provide a concentration in biology and 
teaching. 



PROGRAMS IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES CURRICULUM 



GENERAL 



ALS 103 



Introductory Topics in the 
Agricultural and Life Sciences 



1 



Languages (IS Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Modern (foreign) Language 6 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(SI Credits) 

El ecti ves 21 



Physical Sciences and Mathematics 
(SU-S6 Credits) 

MA 114 Intr. to Finite Mathematics 

with Applications 3 

and 
MA 112, 212 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A and B 4+3 

or 
MA 102, 201, 202 Analytic Geometry 
& Calculus I, 

Hand III 4+4+4 

CH 101 Genera] Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 221. 223 Organic Chemistry I 

and II 4+4 

PY 211, 212 General Physics 4 + 4 



60 



Biological Sciences (Sl-SS Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

ZO 201 General Zoology 4 BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 4 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 GN 411 Principles of Genetics 3 



ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

or 
BO (ZO) 414 Cell Biology 3 



GN 412 Elementary Genetics Lab 1 



NOTE: Students electing ZO 421 or BO (ZO) 414 must also elect either 

ZO 415 Cellular and Animal Physiology Laboratory 2 

or 
BCH 352 Experimental Biochemistry 2 

Electives (23-27 Credits)* 

Restricted Electives from Groups A, 

B, C. and D 11-15 

Free Electives 12 

Sub Total 126 

Physical Education 4 

Hours Required for Graduation .... 130 

BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION 

For the requirements in the biological sciences curriculum, biochemistry em- 
phasis, see BIOCHEMISTRY. 

MICROBIOLOGY OPTION 

Along with the general curriculum for the biological sciences, two additional 
microbiology electives are required; MB 411 and MB 501 are usually recommended. 
MB 401 is required in the BLS curriculum. For graduation, 130 semester credit 
hours are required. 

NUTRITION OPTION 

Three courses in nutrition are required along with the general curriculum for the 
biological sciences (NTR 415, NTR 416, and NTR 490 are the usual requirements). 
For graduation, 130 semester credit hours are required. 

Botany 

Gardner Hall 

Professor G. R. Noggle, Head of the Department and Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: C. E. Anderson, R. J. Downs, J. W. Hardin, W. W. Heck (USDA), H. E. Pattee (USDA), 
H. Seltmann (USDA). J. L. Thomas. J. R. Troyer; Professors Emeriti: D. B. Anderson, H. T. 
Scofield, B. W. Wells, L. A. Whitford: Adjunct Professor: A. Krochmal; Associate Professors: 
U. Blum, D. W. DeJong (USDA), R. C. Fites, R. L. Mott, E. D. Seneca. A. M. Witherspoon; 
Assistant Professors: J. F. Reynolds, H. H. Rogers Jr. (USDA), J. M. Stucky, C. G. Van Dyke. 
T. R. Wentworth, T. E. Wynn; Adjunct Assistant Professor: G. M. Jividen; Associate Members 
of the Faculty: A W. Cooper (Forestry), J. S. Kahn (Biochemistry), D. H. Timothy (Crop Science), 
D. E. Moreland (USDA Crop Science), B. W. Smith (Genetics), M. M. Goodman (Statistics), R. J. 
Thomas (Wood and Paper Science), B. J. Copeland (Zoology) 

The instructional program provides classroom, laboratory, and field experience 
in the major areas of plant science. Undergraduates majoring in botany are given 
a broad background in the humanities and physical sciences and are encouraged 
to participate in independent study in the senior year. Majors are prepared for 
advanced study in botany and other biological fields, as well as in the applied plant 
sciences such as horticulture, crop science, resource management and environ- 
mental biology. 



* Group A includes the physical and biological sciences; Group B, economics and business manage- 
ment; Group C, applied science and technology; Group D, social sciences and humanities. 

61 



OPPORTUNITIES 

Many majors continue with graduate studies; see pages 12-13. There is need for 
such persons for teaching positions in community and junior colleges, colleges and 
universities, for research positions in federal and state government laboratories 
and in private industry. 

Recent federal and state legislation has created a need for botanists in environ- 
mental quality studies. Persons with a Bachelor of Science degree may work in 
air and water quality control programs, in air pollution and in environmental 
impact studies. Field botanists and naturalists are needed in park systems and 
nature programs. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in botany is offered under the 
science curriculum of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The freshman 
year program is shown on page 49. Other basic requirements are on pages 50-54. 

The Bachelor of Science degree with double concentration — one in economics, 
English, history, philosophy or political science, and another in botany — is avail- 
able in the School of Liberal Arts. See pages 148-151 for details. 



BOTANY 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in the ALS . 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Language Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 Credits) 

Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(29 Credits) 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 or 114 Analytic Geo. and Calc. A 

or Intro, to Finite Math. ... 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 or 107 General Chemistry II or 

Princ. of Chem 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 



Physical Education (J, Credits) 
Physical Education 4 



Free Electives (20 Credits) 
Free Electives 



.20 



Group A, B, C Courses 
(20 Credits) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry . . 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory . . 1 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

Science Elective 4 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(23 Credits) 

BO 200 Plant Life 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology . . . 

BO 400 Plant Diversity 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 

Departmental Elective 



Hours Required for Graduation 



130 



Conservation 

(Also see Forest Resources.) 

Williams, Gardner and Biltmore Halls 

M. G. Cook, Major Adviser, School of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

L. C. Saylor, Major Adviser, School of Forest Resources 

J. J. Nicholaides III, Coordinator of Advising 

Conservation is the wise use, perpetuation, or improvement of natural resources, 
without waste, for the long-time benefit of society. This baccalaureate degree pro- 
gram is offered jointly by the Schools of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Forest 
Resources. Faculty members in botany, entomology, forestry, plant pathology, 
recreation, soil science and wildlife are directly involved in various aspects of 
education in conservation. 



62 



Rapid urbanization and industrialization concomitant with population growth 
and changes in lifestyles are bringing increased pressures on the use of land for 
providing food, water, fiber, wood and pleasure. These trends present challenges to 
resource managers who must be well trained in the basic concepts of several 
disciplines in order to apply a conservation philosophy to many of our current 
natural resource problems. 

CONSERVATION CURRICULUM 

Students may enroll in either Agriculture and Life Sciences or Forest Resources, 
depending on their primary area of interest in conservation. The freshman common 
core of courses for either school is acceptable. All students take a prescribed core 
of subjects in conservation; specialty areas are developed through the use of elec- 
tives. Students desiring an education with more professional emphasis may com- 
bine the conservation curriculum with another curriculum, e.g., forestry, soil 
science, zoology, to obtain a second degree. 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Credits 

ALS 103 Introductory Topics in the ALS 

or 
FOR 101 Introduction to Forestry 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

English Elective (Literature) 3 

English Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 Credits) 

Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 Genera] Chemistry II 

or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

BS 100 General Biology 

or 
BO 200 Plant Life 4 



ZO 201 General Zoology 

or 
BO 200 Plant Life 4 

Physical Education 
Physical Education 4 

Free Electives 
Free Electives 13 

Group A, B, C Courses 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 4 

Biological Science Electives 9 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 

GY 120 Elements of Physical Geology 2 

GY 110 Physical Geology Lab 1 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural Resources . 3 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource Manage- 
ment 3 

RRA 241 Recreation Resource Relation- 
ships 3 

ZO 353 Wildlife Management 3 

Conservation Electives 13 

Hours Required for Graduation 128 



Elective courses may be used for emphasizing subject areas in communications, 
soils, wildlife biology, education and others. 



Crop Science 

Williams Hall 

Professor B. E. Caldwell, Head of the Department 
Professor D. A. Emery, Coordinator of Advising 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: C. A. Brim (USDA), J. C. Burns (USDA). T. H. Busbice (USDA). D. S. Chamblee. J. F. 
Chaplin (USDA). W. K. Collins, W. A. Cope (USDA). W. T. Fike. D. U. Gerstel. W. B. Gilbert. 
W. C. Gregory, H. D. Gross. G. L. Jones. K. R. Keller. J. A. Lee (USDA). W. M. Lewis. T. J. 
Mann. R. P. Moore. D. E. Moreland (USDA), L. L. Phillips. J. C. Rice, D. L. Thompson (USDA). 
D. H. Timothy, J. B. Weber, E. A. Wernsman. J. A. Weybrew. A. D. Worsham; Adjunct Professors: 
J. S. Campbell, W. E. Wessling; Professors Emeriti: G. K. Middleton. P. H. Harvey; Associate Pro- 
fessors: F. T. Corbin. G. R. Gwynn (USDA), R. C. Long. C. F. Murphy. R. P. Patterson. W. W. 



63 



Weeks tosistant Professors: J. W. Burton (USDA). J. C. Wynne; Instructor: C. Collins; Associate 
Members of th> Faculty: E. C. Sisler (Biochemistry I. T. J. Sheets (Entomology and Horticultural 
Science) 

EXTENSION 

<8or G. L. Jones, In Charge, Crop Science Extension 

Professors C. T. Blake. S. N. Hawks. F. W. McLaughlin, A. Perry; Professors Emeriti: R. R. Ben- 
nett. S H Dobson. A. D. Stuart; Associate Professors: H. D. Coble, E. L. Kimbrough, W. G. 
Tuomey; Assistant Professors: E. J. Dunphy. E. G. Krenzer. J. P. Mueller, G. A. Sullivan; 
.Assistant Professor Emeritus: R. H. Crouse 

The increase in human populations, the continuing evolution of pests and diseases, 
the challenge of new natural and artificial environments and the decrease of farm- 
land are all critical current world issues. 

This department's curricula were designed to give the crop science major an 
awareness and a sense of personal involvement in these issues. The student receives 
a working knowledge of the fundamental principles of plant science which tend to 
shape modern crop production practices. He or she is trained in the economics of 
various crop management procedures which may influence long-range investments. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The opportunities within the state for crop science graduates in county extension 
programs, in farm management, as salesmen of seed and agricultural chemicals and 
in the several governmental agencies remain good. Demand for qualified students 
in national and international concerns is increasing. 

For crop science graduate programs, see pages 12-13. 

I NDERGRADU ATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in crop science is offered under 
the science curricula of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The science 
curriculum follows. 

Students may also earn a Bachelor of Science under the technology curriculum 
with a major in agronomy. The agronomy option is administered jointly by the 
Departments of Crop Science and Soil Science. For that curriculum, see page 54. 

The Departments of Crop Science, Entomology, Horticultural Science and Plant 
Pathology offer a joint undergraduate major in pest management (for crop pro- 
tection). See pages 73-74 for details. 

CURRICULUM IN CROP SCIENCE 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 



ALS 103 Introductory Topics in the ALS . . 1 

lAinguages tit Crirfit.il 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

12 Composition and Reading 3 

Literature Elective 3 

language Elect. ve 3 

■ i nrf Humamtit » 
(tl Crirfit*i 

Electives .21 

Physical niui Hinlugiinl Sri run « 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic (;«•., metry and 

Calculus A 4 

General Chemistry I . . 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

BO 200 Plant Uf.- 4 



Physical Education 
Physical Education 4 

Free Electives 
Free Electives 12 

Group A, B, C Courses 
(ti Credits) 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

GN 411 TTie Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory . . 1 
MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathe- 
matics with Applications 
or 
MA 212 Analytic Geometry and Cal- 
culus B 3 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

PP 3 15 Plant Diseases 3 

Electives in A, B. or C Courses 2 



54 



Departmental Requirements and Electives 

ft7 Credits) CS 490 Senior Seminar in Crop Science ... 1 



ENT 312 Introduction to Economic 

CS 211 Crop Science 4 ccn OM ^^ Z . 

,~,o „,, r> o-: x u 7 SSC 200 Soil Science 4 



BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 



Soil Science Electives 3 



CS 214 Crop Science Lab 1 

CS 312 Pastures and Forage Crops 3 

CS 414 Weed Science 4 Hours Required for Graduation 130 

TECHNOLOGY (AGRONOMY) PROGRAM 

Departmental Requirements 
(S8 Credits) 

CS 211 Crop Science 4 CS 490 Senior Seminar in Crop Science ... 1 

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory 1 or 

CS 312 Pastures and Forage Crops 3 SSC 492 Senior Seminar in Soil Science ... 1 

or SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

CS 315 Turf Management 3 SSC 342 Soil Fertility Laboratory 1 

CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop SSC 352 Soil Classification 4 

Production 2 SSC (CS) 462 Crop Management Systems . 3 

CS 413 Plant Breeding 2 

CS 414 Weed Science 4 



Hours Required for Graduation 130 



Dairy Science 

(See Animal Science, pages 54-57.) 

Economics and Business 

Patterson Hall 

Professor W. D. Toussaint, Head of the Department 

Professor B. M. Olsen, Assistant Head of the Department and Coordinator of 
Advising 

H. T. Daniel, Scheduling Officer 
TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: A. J. Coutu, E. W. Erickson, R. M. Fearn, D. M. Hoover, L. A. Ihnen, P. R. Johnson. 
R. A. King, G. A. Mathia, E. C. Pasour Jr., R. A. Schrimper, J. A. Seagraves, R. L. Simmons. 
C. B. Turner, J. C. Williamson Jr.; Professors Emeriti: A. J. Bartley, D. R. Dixon, J. G. Sutherland 
(USDA), E. W. Swanson; Associate Professors: D. S. Ball, G. A. Carlson, J. S. Chappell, M. M. 
El-Kammash, R. S. Fenwick, A. R. Gallant, B. L. Gardner, H. C. Gilliam Jr. (USDA), C. W. 
Harrell Jr., D. M. Holthausen, D. N. Hyman, Thomas Johnson, C. P. Jones, E. W. Jones, F. A. 
Mangum Jr., C. J. Messere, R. J. Peeler Jr., R. K. Perrin, J. C. Poindexter Jr., R. E. Sylla. J. W. 
Wilson; Assistant Professors: R. L. Clark, L. E. Danielson, D. B. Diamond, D. J. Flath, T. J. 
Grennes, C. R. Knoeber, J. S. Lapp, M. P. Loeb, R. B. McBurney Jr., M. B. McElroy, L. B. Per- 
kinson (USDA), W. P. Pinna. T. M. Reynolds, W. J. Wessels; Visiting Assistant Professors: G. M. 
Scobie, R. B. Vernon: Assistant Professors Emeriti: J. C. Matthews Jr., O. G. Thompson; Instruc- 
tors: A. M. Beals Jr., W. P. Brown, M. R. Hilliard, M. T. Holcomb. D. M. Holmes, J. M. Jefferys. 
E. W. Leonard. T. N. Taylor; Special Lecturers: C. L. Bergold, G. A. Gunderson, W. P. Windham: 
Associate Members of the Faculty: R. H. Bernhard (Industrial Engineering), W. D. Cooper (Textile 
Technology), D. L. Holley (Forestry) 

EXTENSION 

Professor F. D. Sobering, Assistant Head of the Department, In Charge of Extension 

Professors: R. C. Brooks. D. G. Harwood, H. L. Liner, T. E. Nichols Jr., E. A. Proctor, C. R. Pugh, 
W. L. Turner. C. R. Weathers, R. C. Wells; Associate Professors: J. G. AJlgood, R. D. Dahle, L. H. 
Hammond. H. A. Homme, D. F. Neuman, P. S. Stone; Associate Professor Emeritus: R. S. Boal ; 
Assistant Professor: J. E. Easley Jr.; Assistant Professors Emeriti: E. M. Stalling?. R. P. Uzzle; 
Extension Specialists: C. E. Hammond, S. C. Riddick, S. R. Sutter 

Agricultural economics, leading to a B.S. degree, is one of several fields of 
specialization offered by the Department of Economics and Business. The depart- 
ment is administered jointly by the Schools of Agriculture and Life Sciences and 
Liberal Arts. For information on fields of economics and business other than agri- 
cultural economics see Liberal Arts, pages 149-151. 

65 



The department's general objectives in agricultural economics are: 1) To train 
students in the fundamentals of business organization and to make sound decisions 
in organizing and managing farms and other agricultural businesses; 2) To 
instruct students in economic theory which may be used as a basis for understand- 
ing the relationship of agriculture to other parts of the economy and for the 
evaluation of agricultural policy and economic changes which affect agriculture; 
3) To train graduate students in advanced economic theory and research tech- 
niques. For a list of graduate degrees, see pages 12-13. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The growing number of companies processing and manufacturing agricultural 
products has created an increasing demand for people trained in agricultural 
economics. Opportunities include employment by companies handling farm supplies, 
such as feed, fertilizer and equipment; general marketing and processing firms; 
agricultural cooperatives; professional farm management agencies, and various 
credit agencies. 

Many graduates are employed in research and educational work by various 
agencies of the Federal and state governments. These include the Agricultural 
Extension Service, the Agricultural Experiment Station, the State Department of 
Agriculture and other agencies of the United States Department of Agriculture. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS CURRICULUM 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 



Credits 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in the ALS 1 

languages (It Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Electives — English or Literature 6 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(tl Credits) 

EB 212 Econ. of Agriculture 3 

EB 202 Econ. II 3 

Electives 15 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

MA 111 or MA 114 Alg. & Trig, or Intro. 

to Finite Math 4 or 3 

MA 112 Analy. Geom. & Calc. A A 

MA 212 Analy. Geom. & Calc. B 

I] General Chem. I 4 

CH 103 General Chem. II 4 

BS 100 or BS 105 General Biology 4 

Bio. Sc. Elec. 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 



BUSINESS PROGRAM 

Introductory Topics in the ALS .. 1 
Languages m Credit*) 

11 (V,mp«.Hitiiin and Khetoric 8 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading , .., :i 

l.it.THlur.- g 



Expository Speaking 



■ ■■ 1 1 i i ■ 

tti Credit*) 

EB 212 BOOB, ■ •< Agriculture 

EB 202 Boon. II 

□ectivei 



Phy. Ed. & Free Electives (16 Credits) 

P. E 4 

Free Electives 12 

Group A, B, or C Electives 

ACC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of 

Fin. Reporting 3 

EB 350 or ST 311 Econ. & Bus. Statistics 

or Intro, to Statistics . . 3 
Electives 16 or 17 

Major Requirements and Electives 
(16 Credits) 

EB 301 Production and Prices 3 

EB 302 Agg. Econ. Analysis: Theory 

& Price 3 

EB 303 or EB 325 or EB 551 Production 

Elective ... 3 

EB 311 or EB 313 or EB 521 Mkt. Elec- 
tive 3 

EB 304 or EB 415 or EB 420 Finance 

Elective ... 3 

EB 413 or EB 533 Policy Elective 3 

Electives in Support of Major 8 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



Physical and Biological Sciences 
(t4-t5 Credits) 

Algebra & Trig 4 

or 
Intro, to Finite Math with Appl. . . 3 

Analy. Geo!. & Cal. A 4 

General Chemistry 1 4 

College Physics 5 

BS 100 or BS 105 General Biology or 

Biol, in Mod. World 4 

Bio. Science Elective 4 

Phy. Ed. & Free Electives (16 Credits) 

P. E 4 

Free Electives 12 



MA 


111 


MA 


114 


MA 


112 


CH 


101 


PY 


221 



66 



Group B <iU Credits) Groups A or C 

ACC 260 Accounting I 3 Electives in A or C courses 5-6 

EB 303 or EB 325 or EB 551 Production 

Elective ... 3 Major Requirements and Electives 

EB 311 or EB 313 or EB 521 Marketing (£6 Credits) 

Elective ... 3 
EB 304 or EB 415 or EB 420 Finance 

Elective ... 3 



EB 301 Production and Prices 3 

EB 302 Agg. Ec. Analy 3 

EB 350 Econmics and Business Statistics 
EB 326 or EB 332 or EB 431 Personnel or 3 

™ ™o x, .• ™ Elective ••• j| ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 
EB 413 or EB 533 Pohcy Elect.ve 3 E i ec tives in Support of Major 17 



Hours Required for Graduation 130 



Entomology 

Gardner Hall 

Professor Kenneth L. Knight, Head of the Department and Coordinator of Advising 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: R. C. Axtell, W. V. Campbell, W. C. Dauterman, M. H. Farrier, F. E. Guthrie, Ernest 
Hodgson, W. J. Mistric Jr.. H. B. Moore Jr., H. H. Neunzig. R. L. Rabb, G. C. Rock, T. J. Sheets, 
C. F. Smith, C. G. Wright. D. A. Young Jr.; Adjunct Professors: A. L. Chasson. J. R. Fouts; 
Professors Emeriti: C. H. Brett, T. B. Mitchell; Associate Professors: J. R. Bradley Jr.. W. M. 
Brooks, R. T. Yamamoto; Assistant Professors: K. D. Elsey (USDA), F. P. Hain. G. G. Kennedy, 
R. E. Stinner; Adjunct Assistant Professors: Gordon Gordh, R. M. Philpot; Associate Member of 
the Faculty: D. S. Grosch 

EXTENSION 

Professor: G. T. Weekman, Specialist-in-Charge 

Professor: R. L. Robertson; Professor Emeritus: G. D. Jones; Associate Professor: J. M. Falter, K. A. 
Sorensen; Assistant Professors: J. T. Ambrose, J. R. Baker, R. C. Hillmann, T. E. Reagan, J. W. 
Van Duyn 

The entomology curriculum offers broad training at the undergraduate and 
graduate levels (see pages 12-13) in basic biology and related sciences, particularly 
as they relate to the study of insects. In addition, several courses in entomology 
are offered at the undergraduate level for non-majors. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities include development, production, control and sales positions in the 
pesticide field, consultative positions in pest management, regulatory and extension 
positions with state and federal agencies, and research technician positions in 
universities, agricultural experiment stations and industry. The curriculum also 
provides training suitable for admission to the graduate entomology departments 
of the country. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in entomology is offered under 
the science curriculum of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Students 
are encouraged to gain through judicious use of their electives a strong background 
in the sciences. For the related undergraduate major in pest management (for crop 
protection) see pages 73-74. 

CURRICULUM IN ENTOMOLOGY 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Credits 

ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Languages (It Credits) Literature Elective 3 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Language Elective 3 



67 



Social Sciences and Humanities 
(11 Credits) 



Physical and Biological Sciences 
(t8-t9 Credits) 

MA 1 11 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 



Free Electives 
Free Electives 12 

Group A, B. C Courses 
(it-SJt Credits) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry . . 4 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

GY 120 Elements of Physical Geology 2 



or 



MA 114 

CH 101 
CH 103 
CH 107 
PY 221 

BS 100 
Biologica 



Introduction to Finite 

Mathematics with Applications ... 3 

General Chemistry I 4 

General Chemistry II or 4 

Principles of Chemistry 4 

College Physics 5 

General Biology 4 

I Sciences Elective 4 



SSC 200 
ST 311 
GN 411 
ZO 421 



Soil Science 4 

Introduction to Statistics 3 

"Hie Principles of Genetics 3 

Vertebrate Physiology 3 



Physical Education 
Physical Education 4 



BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 4 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(2 7 Credits) 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic 

Insects 3 

ENT 401 Bibliographic Research in 

Biology 1 

ENG 502 Insect Diversity 4 

ENT 503 Functional Systems of Insects ... 4 

Entomology Electives 15 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 

Food Science 

Schaub Food Science Building 

Professor W. M. Roberts, Head of the Department 

Professor F. G. Warren, Coordinator of Advising 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: L. W. Aurand, T. A. Bell (USDA), T. N. Blumer, H. B. Craig, D. D. Hamann, M. W. 
Hoover. A. E. Purcell (USDA), M. L. Speck, H. E. Swaisgood; Professors Emeriti: J. E. Etchells, 
I. D. Jones: Associate Professors: H. R. Ball Jr., D. E. Carroll Jr., H. P. Fleming (USDA), S. E. 
Gilliland. A. P. Hansen, V. A. Jones, W. M. Walter Jr., (USDA); Assistant Professors: D. M. 
Adams Jr., G. G. Giddings; Adjunct Associate Professor: W. Y. Cobb; Instructor: L. G. Turner 

EXTENSION 

Professor J. A. Christian, In Charge 

Professors: E. Cofer, M. E. Gregory, N. C. Miller Jr., F. R. Tarver Jr., F. B. Thomas; Assistant 
Professors: M. K. Hill, N. L. Kehrberg; Specialists: C. N. Callaway, R. E. Carawan, T. M. Miller 

The Department of Food Science provides undergraduate and graduate programs 
for the application and coordination of the physical and biological sciences, eco- 
nomics and engineering to the development, processing, packaging, quality control, 
distribution and utilization of foods. 

The department maintains modern fully equipped laboratories for teaching and 
research in food microbiology and fermentation, food chemistry, food engineering 
and dairy, fruit, meat, poultry, seafood and vegetable products. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Increasing consumer demands for greater varieties and quantities of highly 
nutritious and convenience foods of uniformly high quality create many varied 
career opportunities in the food and allied industries. 

Food industries career opportunities are: management, research and develop- 
ment, process supervision, quality control, procurement, distribution, sales and 
merchandising. Positions include sales and services in allied industries, consulting 
and trade association activities and promotional and educational services. 

Food Science graduates hold teaching, research and extension positions with 
colleges and universities. Governmental agencies employ food scientists whose 



68 



work is directed toward research, regulatory control and the development of food 
standards. 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in food science is offered under 
the science or technology curriculum of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 
For graduate degrees offered, see pages 12-13. 

CURRICULA IN FOOD SCIENCE 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 



Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in the ALS . . 1 

Languages (IS Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Language Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(SI Credits) 

Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(SI Credits) 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathe- 
matics with Applications 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

PY 212 General Physics 4 



Physical Education (U Credits) 
Electives 4 

Free Electives (IS Credits) 
Electives 12 

Group A, B, C Courses (S3 Credits) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II or 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

El ectives 11 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(SS Credits) 

FS 201 Food Science and Man's Food 3 

FS 331 Food Engineering 3 

FS 402 Food Chemistry 3 

FS 405 Food Microbiology 3 

FS 490 Food Science Seminar 1 

Electives 13 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 



ALS 103 



Credits 
Introductory Topics in the ALS . . 1 



Languages (IS Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(SI Credits) 

Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(SS Credits) 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathe- 
matics with Applications 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

PY 22 1 College Physics 5 



Physical Education (4 Credits) 
Electives 4 

Free Electives (IS Credits) 
Electives 12 

Group A, B, C Courses (S5 Credits) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II or 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Electives 13 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(S7 Credits) 

FS 201 Food Science and Man's Food 3 

FS 331 Food Engineering 3 

FS 402 Food Chemistry 3 

FS 405 Food Microbiology 3 

FS 490 Food Science Seminar 1 

Electives 14 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



69 



Genetics 

Gardner Hall 

Professor J. G. Scandalios, Head of the Department 

Professors D. S. Grosch. W. D. Hanson. W. E. Kloos. C. S. Levings III, T. J. Mann, D. F. Matzinger. 
L. E. Mettler. R. H. Moll. Gene Namkoong (USFS), H. E. Schaffer, B. W. Smith, C. W. Stuber 
(USDA). A. C. Triantaphyllou; Professors Emeriti: C. H. Bostian, S. G. Stephens; Adjunct Pro- 
fessor: H. V. Mailing: Associate Professor: L. G. Burk (USDA); Assistant Professors: G. C. 
Bewley. W. H. McKenzie. J. C. Sorenson; Associate Members of the Faculty: E. U. Dillard, E. J. 
Eisen. J. E. Legates. B. T. McDaniel, O. W. Robison (Animal Science); F. B. Armstrong (Bio- 
chemistry and Microbiology*; C. A. Brim (USDA), J. F. Chaplin (USDA), W. A. Cope (USDA), D. A. 
Emery. D. U. Gerstel. W. C. Gregory. G. R. Gwynn (USDA), J. A. Lee (USDA), P. A. Miller, 
C. F. Murphy, L. L. Phillips, C. F. Tester (USDA). D. L. Thompson (USDA), D. H. Timothy, 

E. A. Wernsman (Crop Science); C. C. Cockerham. M. M. Goodman, J. O. Rawlings (Statistics); 
J. W. Duffield. T. O. Perry. L. C. Saylor, B. J. Zobel (Forestry); F. D. Cochran, G. J. Galletta, 

F. L. Haynes Jr. (Horticultural Science); J. L. Apple, T. T. Hebert, N. T. Powell (Plant 
Pathology); D. M. Briggs. E. W. Glazener, G. A. Martin (Poultry Science) 

The genetics faculty offers instruction at advanced undergraduate and graduate 
levels. The undergraduate courses are designed to support other departments, 
giving students a background in genetics. The graduate program is designed to 
train scientists for research and teaching careers in basic genetics and in its 
application in plant and animal breeding. For graduate degrees offered, see pages 
12-13. 

CURRICULUM 

Since there is no genetics baccalaureate program, undergraduates are encouraged 
to pursue a biological sciences program. 

Horticultural Science 

Kilgore Hall 

Professor J. W. Strobel, Head of the Department 

Professor W. E. Ballinger, Coordinator of Advising 



TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: F. D. Cochran, G. J. Galletta, F. L. Haynes Jr., R. A. Larson, R. L. Lower, C. H. Miller, 
P. V. Nelson; Adjunct Professor: R. L. Sawyer; Professors Emeriti: J. M. Jenkins, D. T. Pope, 
G. O. Randall; Associate Professors: L. K. Hammett, W. R. Henderson, T. R. Konsler. T. J. 
Monaco. W. B. Nesbitt. D. M. Pharr, J. C. Raulston, R. M. Southall, C. R. Unrath, D. C. Zeiger; 
Assistant Professors: J. R. Ballington, W. C. Fonteno; Research Assistant Professor: W. W. Col- 
lins; Instructors: R. K. Kimmins, V. H. Underwood; Associate Members of the Faculty: R. J. 
Downs (Botany); R. L. Mott (Botany); T. J. Sheets (Entomology, Crop Science); R. H. Moll 
(Genetics); R. Aycock (Plant Pathology); R. J. Volk (Soils) 

EXTENSION 

Professor A. A. Banadyga, In Charge 

Professors. J. R. Brooks. M. H. Kolbe, J. W. Love, W. A. Skroch. H. J. Smith; Professors Emeriti: 
H. M. Covington. J. H. Harris; Associate Professors: G. R. Hughes. C. M. Mainland, W. W. Reid, 
D. C. Sanders, L. G. Wilson. J. H. Wilson Jr.; Assistant Professor: M. A. Cohen 

Undergraduate programs in horticultural science offer broad training in physical 
and biological sciences and business and a sound cultural background. Students can 
concentrate studies in the areas of fruit and vegetable crops, floriculture, nursery 
management, or landscape horticulture. They are prepared for either graduate 
study (see pages 12-13) or for diverse professional service. 

North Carolina's varied climatic conditions make possible the production of a 
wide variety of horticultural crops on a commercial scale, as well as in parks and 
gardens. These crops now represent an important segment of N. C. agriculture with 
further expansion to be realized with the development of adapted varieties, 

70 



mechanization and intensification of cultural practices, improvement of handling 
and marketing methods and the development of the food processing industry. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Horticulture graduates fill positions in production, processing, sales and service. 
Among these are county extension agents; vocational agricultural teachers; land- 
scaping and landscape contracting; farm operators; orchard, nursery, greenhouse 
and flower shop managers; research, production and promotional specialists with 
commercial seed, floral, fertilizer, chemical and food companies; inspectors and 
quality control technologists; USDA specialists and as leaders in other phases of 
agricultural and industrial developments. The student may also prepare for a 
career in research, teaching, extension, etc. in horticulture. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in horticultural science can be 
earned in one of the three curricula — business, science, or technology — offered by 
the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Under these curricula, specialized 
training is offered in fruit and vegetable crops, and in floriculture, ornamental 
horticulture (nursery management), and landscape horticulture. (There is also a 
joint undergraduate major in pest management for crop protection; see pages 73-74. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements, see pages 49-54. 

For the business curriculum see page 50. Twenty-four credit hours of business 
courses are substituted for an equal number of hours in the technology curriculum. 

CURRICULUM IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 



ALS 103 



Credits 
Introductory Topics in the ALS . 1 



Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 credits) 

El ecti ves 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A or 4 

Intro, to Finite Mathematics 

with Applications 3 

General Chemistry I 4 

General Chemistry II 4 

College Physics 5 

General Biology 4 

Plant Life 4 

Soil Science 4 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 4 

Free Electives 
Free Electives 12 



MA 


111 


MA 


112 


MA 


114 


CH 


101 


CH 


103 


PY 


221 


BS 


100 


BO 


200 


SSC 


200 



Group A, B, C Courses 
(20 Credits) 

HS 201 Principles of Horticulture (LH) .. 3 
ENT 312 Introduction to Economic 

Insects 3 

PP 3 15 Plant Diseases 3 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

(FV.OH.F) 3 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

HS 301 Plant Propagation (FV.OH.F) 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Lab 

(FV.OH.F) 1 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(27-28 Credits) 

HS 491 Senior Seminar in Horticultural 

Science 1 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 

(FV.H.F) 3 

Technical Elective (FV.OH.F) 3 

Departmental Elective (FV-14) (OH-8) 

(F-ll) Variable 

Tree Fruit Production (FV) 3 

Vegetable Production (FV) 3 



HS 421 
HS 432 
HS 562 
HS 211 
HS 212 
HS 411 
HS 414 
HS 471 
HS 441 
HS 442 
LAR 211 



Post Harvest Physiology (FV) 3 

Ornamental Plants (OH.F.LH) ... 3 

Ornamental Plants (OH.F.LH) ... 3 

Nursery Management (OH.LH) . . 3 

Residential Landscape (OH.LH) . 4 

Arboriculture (OH.LH) 3 

Floriculture I (F) 3 

Floriculture II (F) 3 

Introduction to Landscape 

Architecture (LH) 3 

HS 342 Landscape Horticulture (LH) .... 3 

LAR 321, 322; or 411, 412 (LH) 6 

LAR 410 Site Planning (LH) 3 

HS 495 Special Topics in Horticultural 

Science 2 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



(FV — Fruits and Vegetables, OH — Ornamental, F — Floriculture, LH — Landscape) 



71 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in the ALS 1 

Languages (It Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Language Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
ttl Credits) 

Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A or 4 

MA 114 Intro, to Finite Math, with 

Applications (3) 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

PY 221 College Physics or 5 

PY 211. 212 General Physics (8) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

Physical Education 
Physical Education 4 

Free Electives 
Free Electives 12 



Group A, B, C Courses 
(tO-te Credits) 

CH 22Q Organic Chemistry 4 

MB 401 Microbiology 4 

BO 42 1 Plant Physiology 4 

ENG 312 Introduction to Economic 

Insects 3 

PP 3 15 Plant Diseases 3 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

Group A Electives 4 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(te Credits) 

HS 201 Principles of Horticulture 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Genetics Lab 1 

HS 491 Senior Seminar in Horticultural 

Science 1 

HS 411 Nursery Management (OH) 3 

HS 471 Arboriculture (OH) 3 

HS 211 Ornamental Plants (OH,F) 3 

HS 212 Ornamental Plants (OH.F) 3 

HS 301 Plant Propagation (OH.F) 3 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

(OH.F) 3 

HS 441 Floriculture I (F) 3 

HS 442 Floriculture II (F) 3 

HS 421 Tree Fruit Production (FV) 3 

HS 432 Vegetable Production (FV) 3 

HS 562 Post Harvest Physiology (FV) 3 

Horticultural Science Electives (FV) 9 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



FV — Fruits and Vegetables, OH — Ornamental, F — Floriculture 

BUSINESS PROGRAM 

All required courses in the Technology Program plus 24 hours in Economics and 
Business (see page 50). 

Credits 
Hours Required for Graduation 130 

INDIVIDUALIZED STUDY PROGRAM 

Professor E. W. Glazener, Coordinator of Advising 

The individualized study program entails a curriculum planned by the student 
with the assistance of a faculty advisory committee. Interested students are re- 
quested to follow details of the program through the Director of Academic Affairs, 
115 Patterson Hall. 

Medical Technology 

Gardner Hall 

G. C. Miller, Coordinator of Advising 

North Carolina State University has two parallel programs in medical technology. 
Oil is a four-year curriculum with a Bachelor of Science in zoology followed by a 
year of training in a hospital laboratory school. 

The second program is designed to be completed in four calendar years. The 
stud. -nt takes a prescribed curriculum for three years at North Carolina State 
University. The fourth year consists of a 12-month course in medical technology at 
an affiliated clinical program. Upon completion, a Bachelor of Science degree will 



72 



be granted from N. C. State and a certificate in medical technology from the affili- 
ated hospital. (See zoology, page 83.) 

Microbiology 

Gardner Hall 

Professor J. B. Evans, Head of the Department 

Professors: W. J. Dobrogoez, G. H. Elkan, P. B. Hamilton, J. J. Perry; Professor Emeritus: J. L. 
Etchells; Adjunct Associate Professors: R. E. Kanich, J. J. Tulis; Assistant Professors: R. E. John- 
ston, G. H. Luginbuhl; Adjunct Assistant Professor: D. H. King; Associate Members of the Faculty: 
J. G. Lecce, J. J. McNeill (Animal Science); F. B. Armstrong (Biochemistry); J. L. Etchells, M. L. 
Speck (Food Science); W. E. Kloos (Genetics); D. G. Simmons (Veterinary Science); A. G. Wollum 
II (Soil Science) 

The microbiology program provides basic preparation for professional micro- 
biologists, a microbiology background for students in other sciences, and an aware- 
ness of the microbial world as it relates to our daily lives for non-science majors. 

Microbiology is concerned with the growth and development, physiology, classi- 
fication, ecology, genetics and other aspects of the life processes of an array of tiny, 
generally single-celled, organisms. These organisms may serve as model systems 
for elucidation of fundamental processes that are common to all living cells. 

Most of the major discoveries that have produced the spectacular advances in 
biology during the past decade have resulted from studies of microbial systems. 
Future developments in environmental quality, production of food and fuel, and 
human health, will rely heavily on understanding microbial processes. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Microbiologists are employed in research laboratories, diagnostic and control 
laboratories, teaching, and technical sales and service positions. 

CURRICULUM 

There is no microbiology undergraduate major, so students with a primary 
interest in microbiology are advised to take the biological sciences curriculum with 
the microbiology option (see pages 60-61). Generally as few as 12 credits in micro- 
biology may be recommended. This requires 3 courses (9 credits) in microbiology in 
addition to MB 401, which is part of the basic biological sciences requirements. 
However, if a student does not plan to go beyond the Bachelor of Science level, and 
desires to qualify for registration or a civil service position as a microbiologist, 20 
credits in microbiology should be taken. 

For graduate degree programs, see pages 12-13. 

Pest Management (for Crop Protection) 

Gardner, Kilgore and Williams Halls 
K. L. Knight, Coordinator of Advising 

The major in pest management (for crop protection) is an interdepartmental 
program involving crop science, entomology, horticultural science and plant 
pathology. 

Students in pest management for crop protection receive training in the concepts 
of controlling crop pests in an ecologically sound manner. Crop losses from diseases, 
insects, nematodes and weeds annually run into the billions of dollars in the United 
States. Environmental concerns dictate that control efforts against these organisms 
must be integrated into a total crop production management program on a systems 
approach basis. A high degree of flexibility in electives permits the student either 
to become generally proficient across the field or to develop an area of strength 
against a particular class of pest organisms. 



73 



OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities basically involve improving farm efficiency to meet our ever- 
growing need for food and fiber. Current federal and state statutes require a high 
degree of expertise in the accomplishment of pest control. Completion of the training 
provided by this curriculum qualifies the graduate for positions as county extension 
agents, as federal and state regulatory agents, as technicians in scientific research 
organizations, as pest control specialists in agribusiness concerns, and as custom 
pest management operators. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in pest management (for crop 
protection) is offered under the agricultural science curriculum of the School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see page 49. 

CURRICULUM IN PEST MANAGEMENT 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 



ALS 103 



Credits 
Introductory Topics in the ALS . . 1 



Physical Education 
Physical Education 4 



Languages (It Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Language Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 

<S1 Credits) 

El ecti ves 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(ti-tS Credits) 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

or 
MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathe- 
matics with Applications 3 

CH 101 Genera] Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

BS 100 General Biology 4 



Free Electives 



Free Electives 



12 



Group A, B, C Courses 
(19 Credits) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry . . 4 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 4 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

Major Requirements and Electives 
(36 Credits) 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic 

Insects 3 

ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect 

Control 3 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 3 

PP 500 Plant Disease Control 3 

CS 414 Weed Science 3 

CS (HS) 514 Principles and Methods in 

Weed Science 3 

CS 211 Crop Science 4 

PM 415 Principles of Pest Management ... 3 

Advised Electives 11 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



Plant Pathology 

Gardner Hall 

Professor R. Aycock, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

- r. ; J. L. Apple. K. R. Barker. C. N. Clayton. E. B. Cowling. E. Echandi. G. V. Gooding Jr.. 
F. Grand- T. T. Hebert. S. F. Jenkins Jr.. G. B. Lucas. R. D. Milholland. N. T. Powell. J. P. 
Rom (USDA). J. N. Sasser. H. W. Spurr Jr. (USDA). D. L. Strider. H. H. Triantaphyllou. R. E. 
rt 1, N Vnnttelui - Professors Emeriti: D, E. FJlis. L. W. Nielsen, C. J. Nusbaum. 

F I. Wellman. Adjunct Professors: G. H. Hepting. J. W. Koenigs. E. G. Kuhlman; Associate 
MOT* M K. Beute. A. S. Heagle (USDA). K. J. Leonard (USDA). L. T. Lucas, C. E. Main, 
r\ d <^ inert lUSDA,; A*»*«tant Professors. D. M. Benson. Jeng-sheng Huang. J. W. Moyer, 
D I Srhmitt. T. B. Sutton. C. G. Van Dyke; Adjunct Assistant Professor: N. A. Lapp (NCDA) ; 
/U.orxir. \f. mh,r„ of the Faculty: C. B. Davey (Forestry). M. P. Levi (Forestry) 



74 



EXTENSION 

Associate Professor H. E. Duncan, In Charge 

Professors: F. A. Todd, J. C. Wells; Associate Professors: C. W. Averre III, R. K. Jones, P. B. 
Shoemaker, J. H. Wilson Jr. 

Undergraduate instruction in plant pathology is designed to provide introductory 
and advanced courses on the nature and control of plant diseases to students major- 
ing in crop science, horticultural science, pest management, agricultural education 
and forestry. It can also provide fundamental training necessary for graduate study 
in plant pathology. 

The Department of Plant Pathology cooperates in training pest management 
majors, but does not offer an undergraduate major in plant pathology. For graduate 
degrees offered, see pages 12-13. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Employment in research, extension and teaching is available to graduates with 
advanced degrees in plant pathology. Research openings are with the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, state experiment stations and in industry. The rapid develop- 
ment of agricultural chemicals and other methods for disease control offers numer- 
ous opportunities. See pest management (for crop protection), pages 73-74. 

Poultry Science 

Scott Hall 

Professor R. E. Cook, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor W. R. Prince, Coordinator of Advising 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: W. E. Donaldson, E. W. Glazener, P. B. Hamilton, C. H. Hill, J. B. Ward: Adjunct 
Professor: K. N. May; Professor Emeritus: C. W. Barber; Associate Professors: J. D. Garlich, C. R. 
Parkhurst, J. P. Thaxton; Adjunct Associate Professor: Neil Chernoff; Associate Professors Emeriti: 
W. L. Blow, F. W. Cook; Assistant Professors: F. W. Edens, K. K. Krueger. G. W. Morgan Jr.; 
Associate Members of the Faculty: W. M. Colwell, D. G. Simmons (Veterinary Science) 

EXTENSION 

ProfessorW. C. Mills Jr., In Charge 

Professors: W. G. Andrews, J. R. Harris, G. A. Martin; Professors Emeriti: C. R. Parrish, T. B. 
Morris; Associate Professor: T. A. Carter; Assistant Professor: M. H. Gehle; Instructor: J. R. 
West; Extension Specialist : C. E. Brewer 

The Department of Poultry Science provides instruction in the principles of 
poultry husbandry and in such related fields as nutrition, physiology, genetics and 
pathology. 

Through teaching, research and extension, the department serves students, 
poultrymen and allied industries. Poultry production has increased rapidly during 
the last two decades and ranks second in North Carolina as a source of agricultural 
income. North Carolina ranks fourth nationally in the production of poultry 
products; the climatic and economic conditions in the State provide a sound base 
for continued expansion. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The change from small farm operations to large commercial poultry enterprises 
has created more specialized positions than there are available poultry graduates. 
Off-the-farm operations in activities such as processing and distribution offer new 
job opportunities. The allied industries — feed, equipment, financing and drugs — 
need more employees trained in poultry science. Graduates hold positions as man- 
agers and field representatives for businesses identified with or serving the poultry 



75 



industry. Graduates are also employed in communication and public relations and 
as teachers and extension and research specialists. Some graduates have their own 
poultry businesses. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

Students desiring the Bachelor of Science with a major in poultry science may 
choose any of three curricula offered by Agriculture and Life Sciences. (For 
graduate degrees, see pages 12-13.) One may obtain a double major in certain other 
curricula through careful use of electives and/or summer school attendance. The 
student should consult the undergraduate advisors in the department(s) concerned. 
Currently, the pre-veterinary science student may utilize all requirements toward a 
Bachelor of Science degree in the science option. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see page 49. 

POULTRY SCIENCE CURRICULUM 

BUSINESS PROGRAM 

This curriculum is for students desiring a background related to the operation 
and management of business firms on a sound economic basis. The general require- 
ments for the business program (24 semester hours) are listed on page 50. The 
student must complete the required courses listed below for the technology program, 
substituting the business program courses for electives in the technology program. 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

This curriculum is for the student interested in the basic biological and physical 
sciences. The student is better prepared for advanced study in various disciplines 
such as genetics, nutrition, physiology and pathology. Several preveterinary stu- 
dents are currently enrolled in this curriculum and are seeking a Bachelor of 
Science degree in poultry science. 

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

This is a more generalized program of study as the curriculum offers a greater 
selection of courses in the applied science and technology areas. The student in the 
business option must complete the required courses in the technology program and 
substitute 24 hours of restricted Group B courses for the electives in technology 
shown below. 



CURRICULUM IN POULTRY SCIENCE 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS 10.3 Introductory Topics in the ALS . . 1 

Languages (It Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

Literature Elective 3 

language Elective 3 

Soeial Science* and Humanities 
It I Credits) 

Elective* 21 

1'hymral and Biological Sciences 
(t8 Credits) 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

or 
MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathe- 
matics with Applications 3 

or 
MA 102 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 4 

76 



CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

or 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Physical Education (/, Credits) 

PE Electives 4 

Free Electives (12 Credits) 
Free Electives 12 

Group A, B, C Courses 
(26 Credits) 

PY 212 General Physics (IfPY211 

was taken) 4 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 3 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

Elective in Group A (Biological Science) ... 4 

Electives in A. B or C Courses 11 



Departmental Requirements and Electivea 
(te Credits) 

PO 201 Poultry Science and Production ... 4 

PO 401 Poultry Diseases 4 

PO 404 Poultry Products 3 

PO 405 Avian Physiology 4 



PO 415 Comparative Nutrition 3 

PO 490 Poultry Seminar 1 

PO 520 Poultry Breeding 3 

PO 524 Comparative Endocrinology 4 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

ALS 103 Introductory Topics in the ALS . . 1 

Language (It Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(tl Credits) 

Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(SI to SS Credits) 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

or 
MA 1 14 Introduction to Finite Mathe- 
matics with Applications 3 

or 
MA 102 Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus I 4 

CH 101 Genera] Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

or 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Elective in Group A (Biological Science) ... 4 

Physical Education 
(i> Credits) 

PE Electives 4 



Free Electives 
(It Credits) 

Free Electives 12 

Group A, B. C, Courses 
(19 to It Credits) 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry ... 4 
or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

PY 212 General Physics (If PY211 

was taken) 4 

Electives in A, B, or C Courses 11 to 15 

Poultry Science Requirements 
(tS Credits) 

PO 201 Poultry Science and Production ... 4 

PO 301 Evaluation of Live Poultry 2 

PO 401 Poultry Diseases 4 

PO 402 Commercial Poultry Enterprises . . 4 

PO 404 Poultry Products 3 

PO 405 Avian Physiology 4 

PO 415 Comparative Nutrition 3 

PO 490 Poultry Seminar 1 

PO 520 Poultry Breeding . 3 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



BUSINESS PROGRAM 

All required courses in the Technology Program plus 24 hours in Economics and 
Business Management (see page 50). 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



Premedical Sciences 

Gardner Hall and Grinnells Laboratory 

J. R. Roberts and W. C. Grant, Coordinators of Advising 

Premedical, predental and preveterinary programs are offered as a group of core 
courses in several curricula tracts in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 
Requirements for all the premedical sciences are similar. Requirements may be 
met either through the science curriculum or the biological sciences curriculum. A 
number of students are accepted each year in leading medical colleges; several have 
received outstanding scholarships. 

For further details on the preveterinary curriculum, see veterinary science, 
pages 80-81. 

For the premedical and predental details, see zoology, pages 81-85, and the bio- 
logical sciences curriculum, pages 60-61. 

77 



Sociology and Anthropology 

(Also see Liberal Arts) 
1911 Building 

S. ('. Mayo, Head of the Department 
Assoc tsor K. M. Suval, Assistant Head of the Department 

tsorj. N*. Young, Coordinator of Advising 
Associate Professor A. C. Davis, Coordinator of Advisi)ig (Rural Sociology) 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

■ I.. W. Drabick, C. P. Marsh, G. C. McCann, H. D. Rawls, M. M. Sawhney; Professor 
C. H. Hamilton; Associate Professors: R. C. Brisson, W. B. Clifford II, C. V. Mercer, 
R. L. Moxley, R. D. Mustian, G. S. Nickerson, I. E. Russell, O. Uzzell, R. C. Wimberley; Visiting 
AxHiirmti professor: K. D. Kim; Assistant Professors: W. T. Austin, C. G. Dawson. R. S. Ellovich, 
L R. Delia Fave, V. A. Hiday, T. M. Hyman. P. T. McFarlane, J. G. Peck. L. J. Rhoades. J. 0. 
Shurling. P. L. Tobin. M. L. Walek, J. M. Wallace. M. T. Zingraff; Visiting Assistant Professors: 
H L. Atkins, J. F. Denny, R. L. Gilmore 



EXTENSION 

BBori. N. Collins, In Charge of Community Development 

■rs: J. D. George, M. E. Voland; Professor Emeritus: J. W. Crawford; Associate Professors: 
V. E. Hamilton, T. N. Hobgood Jr., C. E. Lewis, P. P. Thompson: Assistant Professor: C. W. 
Moody 

This department teaches students the principles and techniques for understanding 
human group behavior. More specifically the department seeks: (1) to train stu- 
dents to become leaders in organizing groups and communities and in administering 
their programs; (2) to qualify exceptional students on the undergraduate and gradu- 
ate levels for sociological research, teaching and extension work; (3) to solve prob- 
lems in human group relations through scientific research; and (4) to extend 
research results to the people of the State. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in rural sociology is offered under 
the science curriculum of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Majors in this 
department are offered an option in criminal justice. 

For graduate degrees, see pages 12-13. 

CURRICULUM IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 



Credits 
AI.S 108 Introductory Topics in the ALS . . 1 

wages in Credits) 

I Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Languid- Elective 3 

Social Sci, ncet and Human, In g 

edits) 

SOI 202 Principles of Sociology :; 

Qectivea , „ 

Physiml n ,nl Biological Scieru 1 a 
reditu) 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A , 



CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

or 
CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Botany or Zoology Elective 4 

Physical Education (J, Credits) 
Physical Education 4 

Free Electives (12 Credits) 
Free Electives 12 



Group A, B C. D Courses 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

or 
GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 



7* 



GY 120 Elements of Physical Geology 2 SOC 301 Human Behavior 3 

GY 110 Physical Geology Laboratory 1 SOC 342 Rural Societies Around 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 the World 3 

Electives in A, B, C, or D Courses 15 SOC 416 Research Methods 3 

SOC 411 Community Relationships 3 

Departmental Requirements and Electives ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 3 

SOC 341 Rural Society, USA 3 Sociology and Anthropology Electives ._9 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 

Soil Science 

Williams Hall 

Professor C. B. McCants, Head of the Department 

Professor M. G. Cook, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: S. W. Buol, F. R. Cox, R. B. Daniels (USDA), J. W. Gilliam, W. A. Jackson, E. J. 
Kamprath, R. J. Volk, S. B. Weed, W. G. Woltz; Adjunct Professors: L. J. Metz. C. G. Wells; 
Professors Emeriti: W. V. Bartholomew, J. W. Fitts, J. F. Lutz. W. W. Woodhouse Jr.; Associate 
Professors: G. R. Burns (USDA), D. K. Cassel, G. A. Cummings. E. E. Gamble (USDA), R. E. 
McCollum, C. D. Raper, P. A. Sanchez, A. G. Wollum II; Visiting Associate Professors: R. B. 
Cate, J. L. Walker; Associate Professors Emeriti: W. D. Lee, A. Mehlich, J. R. Piland, W. H. 
Rankin; Assistant Professors: B. L. Carlile, D. W. Israel, H. J. Kleiss. C. K. Martin. G. S. 
Miner, J. F. Shelton; Adjunct Assistant Professor: D. W. Eaddy; Visiting Assistant Professors: 
L. E. Aull, L. D. King, J. J. Nicholaides III; Associate Members of the Faculty: R. W. Skaggs (Bio- 
logical and Agricultural Engineering), E. D. Seneca (Botany), J. B. Weber (Crop Science), C. B. 
Davey (Forestry) 

EXTENSION 

Professors: J. V. Baird, J. A. Phillips; Assistant Professor: G. C. Naderman 

The Department of Soil Science trains students in fundamentals of soils, develops 
an understanding and appreciation of soils as a resource, and presents principles 
of soil management and utilization for both farm and non-agricultural purposes. 
Soils constitute one of the largest capital investments in farming and proper soil 
management is essential for efficient production. Future world food needs will 
require people conversant in soil resources and use of fertilizers. Soil properties 
are important considerations in urban-suburban planning and development. Also, 
knowledge of soil and its interactions with potential pollutants are useful in con- 
serving environmental quality. Therefore, the demand for people trained in soils by 
agribusiness, research, service, planning-development, education and conservation- 
related agencies should continue to be great. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Soil science graduates fill positions of leadership and service in agricultural, 
conservation and resource planning work. Among these are opportunities as farm 
operators and managers, county agricultural extension agents and employees of 
other public advisory agencies, Soil Conservation Service and other conservation- 
related agencies concerned with soil resources, and as technical representatives and 
salesmen in fertilizer companies and other agribusiness. 

Provision is made for students wishing a more thorough training in biological 
sciences, chemistry, mathematics and physics leading to graduate study. (For 
graduate degrees, see pages 12-13.) Students with advanced degrees have wide 
opportunities in teaching, research, service and extension with state, federal and 
private educational and research institutions and agencies. Also, there are in- 
creasing opportunities in support of agribusiness. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The Bachelor of Science degree may be obtained in the Department of Soil 
Science under any of three curricula — science, technology, or conservation. For the 
basic requirements and freshman year, see pages 49-54. The conservation curricu- 
lum is shown on pages 62-63. The agronomy curriculum is on page 54. 



79 



( I RRICULUM IN SOIL SCIENCE 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Credits 
AI.S LOS Introductory Topics in the ALS 1 

Isanguayi s Hi Credits) 

BNG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

BNG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Language Elective 3 

Social Scienei a and Humah ■ 

,,llts) 

Elective* 21 

I'hysiral and Biological Sciences 
hi Credits) 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathe- 
matics with Applications 3 

CH 10] General Chemistry I 4 

<H U>:i General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

IV J 11 General Physics 4 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

f'hysicai Education 
Physical Education 4 



Free Electives 
Free Electives 12 

Group A, B, C Courses 
(!t Credits) 

MA 112 Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

MA 212 Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus B 3 

Chemistry Elective 4 

Chemistry Elective 4 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

GY 1 10 Physical Geology Lab 1 

GY 120 Elements of Physical Geology 2 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(27 Credits) 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

SSC 342 Soil Fertility Laboratory 1 

SSC 352 Soil Classification 4 

SSC 461 Soil Physical Properties and 

Plant Growth 3 

SSC (CS) 462 Soil-Crop Management 

Systems 3 

SSC 492 Senior Seminar in Soil Science ... 1 

Departmental Electives 8 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



Veterinary Science 

Grinnells Animal Health Laboratory 

WOT T. M. Curtin, Head of the Department 

\V. M. Colwell, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: E. G. Batte. D. J. Moncol; Associate Professors: R. C. Dillman, D. G. Simmons; Adjunct 
Associate Professor: M. A. Ross; Assistant Professor: E. C. Hodgin; Adjunct Assistant Professors: 
A. W. Macklin. F. B. McCashin, T. B. Ryan; Associate Members of the Faculty: R. F. Behlow 
(Animal Science), J. R. Harris (Poultry Science), K. E. Muse (Zoology) 

PREVETERINARY CURRICULUM 

Veterinary science department faculty serve as advisers to students enrolled in 
the preventer i nary curriculum. Dr. E. W. Glazener, Director of Academic Affairs, 
serves as secretary of the N. C. Veterinary Certification Committee. 

A preveterinary curriculum is offered under the science curriculum of Agricul- 
ture and Life Sciences as part of the North Carolina Veterinary Medical Education 
Program. After satisfactory completion of the preveterinary curriculum, North 
Carolina resident students are certified as eligible to seek admission to Auburn 
University, Ohio State University, Tuskegee Institute and other colleges of veteri- 
nary medicine in which the State may enter into agreements through the Southern 
Regional Education Board or other contracts for veterinary students to attend at 
in-state tuition rates. 

Preveterinary students work toward a Bachelor of Science degree in a discipline 
of their choice while fulfilling requirements of the preveterinary program. If a 
Btudenl is accepted in a college of veterinary medicine before completion of his or 
her undergraduate degree, some course credits may be transferred from the 
nary program back to N. C. State and applied toward completion of the 
Bachelor of Science degree. Arrangements for this procedure should be made with 
degree-granting department prior to entering veterinary college. 



B0 



The courses listed below are minimum requirements for all students applying 
for entrance into veterinary college under the Southern Regional Education Board 
contract.* A grade of C or better on each course and an overall grade point average 
of 2.7 on required courses are minimum requirements for certification by the North 
Carolina Certification Committee. 

Languages: Semester Hours 

ENG 111. 112 English Composition 6 

VET 333 Medical Vocabulary 2 

(or 6 sem. hrs. college credit in a foreign language) 

Social Sciences! Humanities: 

(A minimum of 18 semester hours is required by most schools of veterinary medicine 
and 21 hours are required for a B.S. degree at NCSU.) 

PS 201 American Governmental System 3 

History or Two courses in Western Civilization, World 6 

Literature History of one course in World Literature 

and one course in history to be chosen from: 

HI 204, HI 205, HI 207, HI 233 or ENG 205 

Additional Social Sciences/Humanities Electives 9 

Physical and Biological Sciences: 

MA 111 or MA 114 Algebra and Trigonometry or Introduction to Finite 

Mathematics with Applications 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 221, 223 Organic Chemistry I, II 8 

PY 211, 212 General Physics 8 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

ZO 323 or ZO 203 Comparative Anatomy or Vertebrate Zoology 4 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory 1 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

BCH 352 Elementary Biochemistry Laboratory 1 

Applied Science and Technology: 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science (Recommended 4 

as prerequisite for ANS 204 or 415) 
ANS 204 or 415 Livestock Feeds and Feeding or 3 

Comparative Nutrition 3 

* Based on requirements of Auburn University** 
** Ohio State University requirements differ from Auburn University requirements in that they 
strongly recommend courses in speech, communications, economics, sociology and psychology, but 
they do not have specific requirements for VET 333, PS 201, HI 204, HI 205, HI 207 or HI 233. 

** Tuskegee Institute requirements differ from Auburn University requirements in that they require 
PO 201 (Poultry Science and Production), but do not have specific requirements for VET 333, 
PS 201, BCH 351, BCH 352 or MB 401. 

As students progress through the preveterinary course requirements they should 
concentrate on courses to complete a degree program and work toward an alternate 
career objective. 

Zoology 

Gardner Hall 

Professor R. Harkema, Acting Head of the Department and Coordinator of Advising 

Professor F. S. Barkalow, Coordinator of Advising in Wildlife Biology 

Professors: W. W. Hassler. C. F. Lytle, B. S. Martof, G. C. Miller, T. L. Quay, J. F. Roberts, D. E. 
Smith: Adjunct Professors: J. B. Funderburg, J. E. Hobbie, T. R. Rice, J. G. Vandenbergh, P. N. 
Witt: Professors Emeriti: B. B. Brandt, D. E. Davis; Associate Professors: P. C. Bradbury, M. T. 
Huish (USDI), K. E. Muse, J. M. Whitsett II; Adjunct Associate Professor: D. E. Gardner; Assistant 



81 



.;. T. Barthalmus. P. D. Doerr. W. C. Grant, J. H. Kerby (USDI). J. M. Miller. G. G. 

H x i nderwood, T. G. Wolcott; Adjunct Assistant Professors: F. A. Cross. R. L. Ferguson. 

I) E. H">- 'J H. Huntsman. D. S. Peters. L. W. Reiter. G. W. Thayer: Visiting Assistant Pro- 

.'. I. Kickards Jr.. O. T. Sanders Jr.: Instructor: W. A. Luebke; Visiting Instructors: 

K. Grimes; Adjunct Instructors. W. B. Baker. R. B. Hamilton, R. B. Hazel: 

... \,, ,„i,. iculty: B. J. Copeland (Botany. Sea Grant Program). D. S. Grosch. 

1. ,i; I). W. Hayne (Statistics) 

The Department of Zoology provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in 
specialized biological sciences areas. Undergraduates study all levels of biological 
organization from the molecular to the community. Zoology majors are adequately 
prepared for graduate work in zoology and related fields of sciences. For graduate 
degrees, see pages 12-13. Participation in supervised programs of research is 
strongly encouraged. Basic training is also available for students planning to enter 
dentistry, medicine and veterinary medicine and allied health sciences, such as 
medical technology. Ecology is emphasized, including wildlife, fisheries, conserva- 
tion, parasitology and marine science. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Students may continue with graduate research work leading to advanced degrees 
in zoology and wildlife. However, numerous employment opportunities are available 
for Bachelor of Science graduates. Majors are qualified for positions in the medical 
sciences, various government agencies and private industries. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in zoology, wildlife biology or 
medical technology is offered under the science curriculum of the School of Agri- 
culture and Life Sciences. Within these majors a student may specialize depending 
upon interest and ability. 

The zoology sequence prepares students for graduate school while the premedi- 
cal. predental and preveterinary options prepare students for entrance into these 
respective professional schools. Certain professional schools have specific require- 
ments which differ slightly from the zoology curriculum. Students should consult 
catalogs of specific professional schools to ensure completion of any special re- 
quirements. 

Other options include the fisheries and marine science program and the medical 
technology program outlined below. The clinical year for the medical technology 
program is taken at an affiliated hospital. Students are advised, especially in their 
junior and senior years, by faculty in their specialty. 

Basic requirements are listed in the science curriculum on page 49. 

( I RRICULUM IN ZOOLOGY 
SCIENCE PROGRAM 



Credits 
AI.S 108 Introductory Topics in the ALS . . 1 

Languagt » (it ( v< dits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

BNG WJ. Composition and Reading :{ 

iture Kit ctive :•! 

!.■• Elective :i 

Social Scu nces and Humanities 
edits) 
Bled ivei 21 

Physical and Biological Scu nces 

MA 1 1 1 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A I 

General Chemistry I i 

CH 108 or HI 101 Gen. Ch. I or Prin- 
ciples of Chemistry I 



PY 211, 212 General Physics 



PY 221 College Physics 5 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Physical Education 
Physical Education 4 

Free Elect in 8 
Free Electives 12 

Croup A Courses 
(27-31 Credits) 

CH 220. BCH 351 Introductory Organic 
Chemistry, Elementary 
Biochemistry 8 



CH 221, CH 223 Organic Chemistry I. II . . 8 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory . . 1 
Advised Electives 15-19 



82 



Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(24 or 25 Credits) 

ZO 202. ZO 208 Invertebrate Zoology. 

Vertebrate Zoology 8 

or 
ZO 201. ZO 323 General Zoology. 

Comparative Anatomy ... 8 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

or 
ZO 414 Cell Biology 3 



ZO 415 Cellular and Animal Physiology 

Laboratory 2 

ZO 360 Introduction to Ecology 4 

or 

ZO 361 Vertebrate Embryology 4 

Zoology Electives 3 or 4 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



CURRICULUM IN WILDLIFE BIOLOGY 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 



ALS 103 



Credits 

Introductory Topics in the ALS . . 1 



Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

English Elective 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 Credits) 

Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(40 Hours) 

Plant Life 4 

General Biology 4 

General Chemistry I 4 

General Chemistry II 4 

Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

College Physics 5 

Invertebrate Zoology 4 

Vertebrate Zoology 4 

Introduction to Statistics 3 



BO 


200 


BS 


100 


CH 


101 


CH 


103 


MA 


111 


MA 


112 


PY 


221 


ZO 


202 


ZO 


203 


ST 


311 



Physical Education 
Physical Education 4 

Free Electives 
Free Electives 13 

Group A, B, C Courses 
(21 Hours) 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry . 

BO 403 

CH 220 

GN 411 

ZO 360 

ZO 421 



Systematic Botany 4 

Introductory Organic Chemistry ... 4 

The Principles of Genetics 3 

Ecology 4 

Vertebrate Physiology 3 



Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(18 Hours) 

ENT (BS) 410 Biology of Insects 3 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural 

Resources 3 

ZO 353 Wildlife Management 3 

ZO 420 Fishery Science 3 

ZO 501 Ornithology or ZO 544 

Mammalogy 3 

ZO 553 Principles of Wildlife Science 3 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



SCIENCE PROGRAM IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

G. C. Miller, Coordinator of Advising 

Two programs are available in medical technology. The first is a four-year collegi- 
ate curriculum with a Bachelor of Science degree in zoology (see above) followed by 
a year of training in any hospital clinical laboratory approved by the American 
Medical Association. The second program is designed to be completed in four 
calendar years. The student takes the prescribed curriculum for three years at 
North Carolina State University and a fourth year (12 months) of clinical training 
at an affiliated hospital. Successful completion of this program qualifies the student 
for a Bachelor of Science degree in medical technology from N. C. State. Acceptance 
by the clinical laboratory is competitive and students in either program outlined 
above must apply for clinical training. After completion of either program the 
student is eligible to take the national examination of the Board of Registry of 
Medical Technologists. 

For the freshman year see page 49. 

CURRICULUM IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 



Courses 



Credits 



ALS 103 Introductory Topics in the Ag. 

& Life Sciences 1 



Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Literature Elective 3 

English. Speech, or Language Elective 3 



83 



Social Sciences & Humanities 

Electives (no more than two in any one 

Department) 21 

I'hyxical and Biological Sciences 

MA 1 1 1 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 1 12 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus A 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

PY 2 11 General Physics 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

ZO 201 General Zoology 4 

I'hyxical Education 
Physical Education 4 

Fret F.Uctivea 
Free Electives 12 

Croup A, B. C Courses 
(26 or 27 Credits) 

CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry and 4 

BCB B51 Elem. Biochemistry 3 

or 
CH 221 Organic Chem. I & CH 223 

Organic Chem. II 8 



PY 212 General Physics 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

MB 411 Medical Microbiology 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory .. 1 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 

ZO 203 Vert. Zoology or ZO 212 Basic 

Anatomy or ZO 323 Comparative 
Anatomy 4 

ZO 421 Vert. Physiology or ZO 414 Cell 

Biology 3 

plus 

Twleve-month course in Medical 
Technology at an affiliated hospi- 
tal — U0 to 50 credits transferred to 
NCSU 

Microbiology Hematology 

Blood Bank- Serology- 

Coagulation Immunology 

Clinical Chemistry Urinalysis 

Hours Required for Graduation 150 



OPTION IN ZOOLOGY CURRICULUM 

Students desiring to emphasize certain areas within zoology may choose an 
option: 

CURRICULUM IN PREMEDICAL-PREDENTAL OPTION 



COU rses Credits 

ALS 103 Introductory Topics in the Ag. & 

Life Sciences 1 

languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

I jterature Elective 3 

Language Elective 3 

Social Sciences & Humanities 

(21 Credits) 

Electives 21 

I'hyxical and Biological Sciences 
(28 Credits) 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus A 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

ZO 201 General Zoology (Animal Life) .... 4 



Physical Education 

Physical Education 4 

Free Electives 

Free Electives 12 

Group A Courses (26 Credits) 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory . . 1 

Advised Electives 6 

Departmental Requirements & Electives 
(26 Credits) 

ZO 323 Comparative Anatomy 4 

ZO 415 Cellular & Physiology Laboratory .. 2 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

ZO 361 Vertebrate Embryology 4 

Advised Electives 13 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 



CURRICULUM IN FISHERIES AND MARINE SCIENCE OPTION 

Con isis Credits 

AI.S 103 Introductory Topics in Ag. & 

Life Science 1 



l.anguno' a fi2 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 



English Elective 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Sciences & Humanities 

Electives (no more than two in any one 

Department) 21 



84 



MA 


111 


MA 


112 


CH 


101 


CH 


103 


PY 


221 


BS 


100 


ZO 


201 



Physical and Biological Sciences 
(28 Credits) 

Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus A 4 

General Chemistry I 4 

General Chemistry II 4 

College Physics 4 

General Biology 4 

General Zoology* 



ZO 203 Vertebrate Zoology 4 

Physical Education 
Physical Education 4 

Free Elect ives 
Free Electives 12 



ZO 


323 


ZO 


202 


ZO 


221 


ZO 


420 


ZO 


421 


ZO 


360 


ZO 


441 


ZO 


519 



Group A Courses (25 Credits) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry ... 4 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

BCH 352 Elementary Biochemistry Lab ... 1 

ENT 301 Introduction to Forest Insects ... 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 4 

Advised Electives 7 

Departmental Requirements 

(2 7 Credits) 

Comparative Anatomy 4 

or 

Invertebrate Zoology 4 

Conservation of Natural Resources 3 

Fishery Science 3 

Vertebrate Physiology 3 

Introduction to Ecology 4 

Ichthyology 3 

Limnology 4 

Fishery Elective 3 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 

* If ZO 201 is taken, then ZO 323 should be elected rather than ZO 202. 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

J. E. Legates, Dean of Agriculture and Life Scieyices 
K. R. Keller, Director of Research 

The Agricultural Experiment Station is the agricultural and forestry research 
agency of the State of North Carolina. It is funded principally by appropriations 
from the North Carolina General Assembly and an allocation of federal funds. 

The purpose of the Agricultural Experiment Station is to conduct research on (1) 
the development and maintenance of an effective agricultural and forestry industry 
in North Carolina, including economically sound sources of supplies and equipment 
needed in agriculture and forestry and market outlets for the products of agricul- 
ture and forestry, (2) the improvement of rural homes, rural life and rural environ- 
ment, and (3) the maintenance of a reliable supply of agricultural and forestry 
products for the consuming public. This requires research to solve current problems 
and research to provide a foundation of scientific knowledge in the biological, 
physical and social sciences. 

The faculty conducts experiments in the phytotron greenhouses and laboratories 
of the University and throughout the State on 15 strategically located experimental 
farms and on rented farm land. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station faculty brings well trained personnel to 
the University, whose teaching in many specialized fields of agriculture assures the 
maintenance of curricula of high standards. It contributes to the advanced training 
of students who are destined to become the leaders, teachers and investigators 
necessary in the maintenance of agriculture on sound and economic planes. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The Agricultural Experiment Station publishes bulletins and scientific papers on 
research results conducted by the staff. Single copies of these publications are sent 
free upon request to anyone in the State. 

SERVICES 

The faculty and staff diagnoses and interprets problems for farmers and agri- 
business firms in North Carolina. Station personnel counsel farmers and others 
interested in the agricultural and forestry industry, present radio and television 
programs devoted to the discussion of farm and forestry procedures, and write 
letters and articles on more specific problems of agriculture at the request of 
farmers, garden club members, newspapers, agricultural magazines and manufac- 
turers of fertilizer and pesticides. Researchers also take part in administrative 
functions of the University. 

85 



Agricultural Extension Service 

J. E. Legates. Dean of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

George Hyatt Jr.. Associate Dean and Director of the Agricultural Extension 
Se /■■ 

The Agricultural Extension Service of North Carolina State University is a 
cooperative undertaking among the United States Department of Agriculture, the 
State of North Carolina and the 100 counties in the State. Its work is supported by 
federal funds made available under the Smith-Lever Act of 1914, as amended, and 
by state and county appropriations. 

The federal and state appropriations are used to maintain an Administrative and 
Specialist staff and to pay a portion of the salary and the travel expenses of the 
County Extension Agents. Under this cooperative arrangement, the Agricultural 
Extension Service serves as the "educational arm" of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, and as the "field faculty" of North Carolina State University 
in the areas of agricultural production and marketing; family living; 4-H and 
youth; and, community and natural resource development. 

OBJECTIVES 

The primary purpose of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service is to 
take to the people of the State the latest and best information obtainable — par- 
ticularly that which is related to agriculture; home economics and youth; and, rural 
development — and help them to interpret and use this information in building a 
more prosperous and satisfying life. 

To accomplish this purpose, the Institution maintains a staff of trained special- 
ists in each of the major subject matter areas. These specialists work primarily 
with and through the County Agricultural, Home Economics and 4-H Agents in 
the conduct of a state-wide educational program. 

This program has sufficient flexibility to permit special attention to the prob- 
lems, needs and interests of the people in each county. Educational assistance is 
given to individuals, families, industrial processing and marketing firms, other 
businesses and certain organizations. This includes work with adult men and 
women and boys and girls in both the city and the rural areas. 

In carrying out this educational program, a variety of methods and techniques 
are employed: method and result demonstrations; meetings; visits to farms, homes 
and businesses; organized groups of men, women and youth; tours; leaflets, 
pamphlets and other printed materials and mass media. 

The basic sources of information to be taught through this educational program 
are the findings and recommendations resulting from research conducted by Experi- 
ment Stations in this and other states and by the United States Department of 
Agriculture. 

Agricultural Institute 

Patterson Hall 

J. E. Legates, Dean of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

E. W. Glazener, Associate Dean and Director of Academic Affairs 

H. B. Craig, Associate Director of Academic Affairs and Director of the Agricul- 
tural Institute 

The Agricultural Institute is a two-year, terminal academic program which 
P ro " nin e in agriculture and related areas. It is part of the School of 

Agriculture and Life Sciences at North Carolina State University. This program 
was begun in 1959 and was funded by legislative appropriation. 

Its objective is to train those desiring a comprehensive education in agriculture 
and agribusiness. 

86 



Individuals with Institute training command attractive salaries, assume a more 
prominent role of leadership and become a distinct asset to various segments of 
agricultural society. They make significant contributions to their community, state 
and nation by being involved in the world's most vital industry. 

The instructional programs are organized and conducted as a part of the over-all 
resident instruction program for Agriculture and Life Sciences. The Institute is 
an addition to and not a substitute for, the School's regular degree granting pro- 
gram. However, the faculty in residence for the four-year programs are responsible 
for organizing and teaching courses offered by the Institute. 

People with training similar to that of the Institute are in demand by agricul- 
tural industries. As demand changes, courses will be evaluated and alterations 
will be made accordingly. Such a re-evaluation also aids the technical manpower 
needs of agricultural industry. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Rapid technical advancement has been important in changing agriculture from a 
small production industry to the nation's largest industry. Closely associated 
with production agriculture are those areas related to recreation and beautification 
such as turfgrass management, flowers and ornamental plants. Increased produc- 
tion and consumer demand for convenience type foods have stimulated the food 
processing industry, in turn increasing food distribution requirements. 

Today's complex agriculture requires a larger work force. This work force must 
be able to deal with a vast array of problems and opportunities and Institute 
graduates can assume responsible positions in the total agricultural industry. Some 
career examples are: farm and herd managers, research technicians, salesmen, 
retail farm supply and equipment outlet managers, golf course superintendents, 
nursery managers, agricultural pest control specialists, quality control technicians, 
food service supervisors and others. More job opportunities than graduates make 
salaries attractive. 

The School maintains a Placement Office to assist graduates in finding employ- 
ment. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Any individual who has received a diploma from an accredited high school or has 
passed the high school equivalency examination administered by the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction is eligible for admission consideration. Each application 
will be reviewed and evaluated by the Institute director. 

For additional information write: Director, Agricultural Institute, 107 Patterson 
Hall, Raleigh, N. C. 27607. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Graduates of the Agricultural Institute are awarded the Associate in Applied 
Agriculture degree. The 10 programs of study are: Agricultural Equipment Tech- 
nology; Agricultural Pest Control; Field Crops Technology; Flower and Nursery 
Crops Technology; Food Processing, Distribution and Service; General Agriculture; 
Livestock Management and Technology (animal husbandry option and dairy hus- 
bandry option); Soil Technology; and Turfgrass Management. 



87 



DESIGN 

Brooks Hall 
C. E. McKinney, Dean 
H. K. Zschau, Librarian 
R. P. Burns, Coordinator 

The School of Design, since its beginning in 1948, has addressed design in the 
broadest sense involving the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture, 
product and visual design in a context of educational innovation. While the de- 
signer's traditional role is understood as that of giving meaningful form to the 
environment, the School gives attention to the larger responsibility of design in 
human, social, economic, political and behavioral terms. The School seeks to develop 
the designer's perception, knowledge base, skills and analytical problem solving 
abilities. 

The expanding range of career opportunities in design, professional and other- 
wise, is equaled by the varied interests possessed by our students. Through a 
selective admissions process, the School's student population is highly motivated 
and heterogeneous. Our faculty represents an equally broad spectrum of educa- 
tional and professional expertise. The diversity of the faculty, both professionally 
and philosophically, provide unique opportunities for student development. These 
three factors in our educational matrix (career opportunities, student interests, and 
faculty expertise) are supported with a curriculum which affords each student the 
ability to shape, with faculty advice, a plan of study capable of facilitating his or 
her interests. While the School embraces the design disciplines of architecture, 
landscape architecture, product and visual design within a program structure, it 
functions as a unified educational center, interactive and dedicated to preparing 
designers who are capable of shaping the environment in whatever scale they 
choose but in response to the needs of society. 

CURRICULA AND DEGREES 

The School of Design offers undergraduate instruction leading to a Bachelor of 
Environmental Design degree in the disciplines of architecture, landscape archi- 
tecture and product design with a visual design option. 

The learning activities for our students are divided into three curriculum areas: 
(1) general courses including English, mathematics, social science, humanities, 
physical science and other University courses; (2) core courses which deal with 
bodies of knowledge and skills applicable to design and common to all disciplines; 
including communication and graphics, behavior, environment, history and philoso- 
phy, physical elements and systems, methods and management (these courses are 
largely taught within the School but include selected University courses as well); 
(3) studio courses providing the arena in which students apply their skills and 
knowledge to problems that are both real and theoretical. These synthetic activities 
are time intensive and are fundamental to design education. 

After the common experience in first year, these studios relate to the student's 
declared disciplinary major. The flexibility of this curriculum plan affords the stu- 
dent the greatest opportunity to concentrate in a single discipline but facilitates 
his or her contact with other design disciplines. The curriculum reflects the reality 
of the environmental marketplace where designers relate to a broad range of 
design and development professionals — not in isolation. 

Graduate studies are also offered in architecture, landscape architecture and 
product design. See the Graduate Catalog for information on the Master's programs. 

DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS PROGRAM 

Assistant Professor M. Pause, Program Director 

Prqftnon: I). R. Stuart. J. H. Cox; Associate Professors: G. L. Bireline Jr., R. W. Musselwhite, 
B. W. Taylor; Assistant Professor: P. Tesar 

88 



The design fundamentals program is focused on exposure to basic design concepts 
and provides counseling, orientation and an historical structure for the fields of 
design in general and for future studies in the School and the University. The 
student develops through exploration and investigation of physical form. 

Architecture 

Brooks Hall 

Professor J. Loss, Program Director 

Professors: R. P. Burns Jr., H. Sanoff, V. Shogren, D. R. Stuart; Professors Emeriti: H. H. Harris, 
H. L. Kamphoefner; Associate Professors: P. Batchelor, R. H. Clark, G. J. P. Reuer, E. W. Taylor; 
Assistant Professors: D. W. Barnes, S. Kanda, M. Pause, J. O. Tector, P. Tesar; Visiting 
Instructor: W. Place 

Architecture finds itself at a critical stage in its historical development. The 
architect's traditional role of giving meaningful form to our physical environment 
remains a chief concern, but this task has been vastly complicated by the forces of 
accelerating world urbanization. The evolution of society in social and technological 
terms rapidly alters every facet of contemporary life. The changing conditions 
in our urban centers have modified attitudes about obsolescence and inefficiency 
in all of our life support systems, including housing, transportation, commerce, and 
numerous others. We are looking at our environment in different terms with inno- 
vation, conservation, preservation and adaptive use of our existing man-made forms 
to meet society's changing needs. The architecture program attempts to prepare 
individuals with an understanding of man and his cultural context with a commit- 
ment to the ordering of the physical environment and with the tools for accom- 
plishing these objectives. 

The curriculum, while providing a broad basic structure common to all students, 
encourages individual diversity through a major elective program of in-depth study 
in one of the several design related fields, through interdisciplinary studies in the 
School and the University, and through the use of outside consultants. The inter- 
dependence of the architect with related professionals is strongly emphasized. The 
design studio is a working laboratory in which analysis and synthesis become real 
and meaningful activities to the students. Considering the expanding requirements 
in the field of architecture and the increasing complexity of the architect's role, 
a six-year, two-degree curriculum has been established. After a common first year 
in design fundamentals, the sophomore, junior and senior years mark the formal 
introduction to architectural studies and lead to the undergraduate, non-profes- 
sional degree, the Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture. For students 
not advancing to graduate studies, the four-year undergraduate curriculum is 
designed as a terminal program qualifying students to enter architecture at an 
intermediate level or related fields outside of architecture. Students who later 
wish to pursue the professional, accredited degree in architecture must enroll in the 
Master of Architecture program. See the Graduate Catalog for information on the 
Master's program. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The graduate with a Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture is quali- 
fied for positions in public agencies, development organizations, building research, 
building construction firms and private architectural offices. State law now requires 
the graduate with an accredited, professional degree in architecture to work not 
less than three years in the offices of registered architects and then pass a written 
examination given by the North Carolina Board of Architecture prior to being 
licensed as an "architect". Graduates with the non-professional Bachelor's degree 
have additional work and examination requirements which vary with State laws. 



89 



ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM CURRICULUM 

Degree: Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture 

FIRST YEAR 

Fall S>m, Hit r Credits Sprittg Semester Credits 

DF 101 Environ. Des. I 6 DF 102 Environ. Des. II 6 

DN 141 Hist, of Des. I 3 DN 142 Hist, of Des. II 3 

ENG 111 Comp. & Rhet 3 ENG 112 Comp. & Read 3 

Math' 3 Math i 4/3 

Phy. Ed _1 Phy. Ed 1 

16 17/16 

SECOND YEAR 

Full Sim.ntir Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio: 6 Studio 2 6 

Nat. Science Elec.3 4 Nat. Science Elec.3 4 

Soc. Sci./Hum. Elec.< 3 Soc. Sci./Hum. Elec* 3 

Core* 3 Core« 3 

Phy. Ed JL Phy. Ed JL 

17 17 

THIRD YEAR 

Full Srmr8tir Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio 2 6 Studio* 6 

Soc. Sci./Hum. « 3 Soc. Sci./Hum.* 3 

Advised Elec* 3 Advised Elec* 3 

Core* 3 Core* 3 

Core* _3 

18 15 

FOURTH YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Advised Elec.s 3 Free Elec 3 

Free Elec 3 Free Elec 3 

Free Elec 3 Core« 3 

Core« 3 Cores 3 

Core* 3 Core* 3 

15 15 

Hours Required for Graduation 129' 



i Must include one calculus course and may include one computer science course. May not include 
credit for Math 111. 

2 A minimum for four 400 series studios are required with a minimum of three of the four being ARC 
400. The four studios may be taken at any time during the final six semesters; however, no more 
than one studio may be taken in any semester. 

3 Selected from natural, physical, or biological sciences, but not to include math or computer science 
courses. 

* The University requires 18 hours in social science/humanities area. This requirement met by DN 
141. 142 in freshman year and 12 hours of electives. Courses not limited to any specific departments 
but may include any courses which have humanities or social science orientation — normally courses 
from Anthropology (ANT), Economics and Business (ACC, EB). Foreign Languages (GRK, LAT, 
Kl.r FLO, KM. FLR, FLS). History (HI), Literature (ENG), Philosophy (PHI), Political Science 
(PS). Psychology (PSY). Religion (RED, Social Work (SW), Sociology (SOC). and University 
Studies (UNI) 

» Advised electees are to be selected after consultation with the advisor. They may include studios 
and core courses from the School of Design or courses from the University at large but may not 
include credit for Art (ART). Military Science (AS, MS), Music (MUS) below 200 level, or Physical 
Kducation (PE). 

* Each architecture student is required to take a minimum of one entry course in four of the six 
eoroa (Graphics and Communications. Behavior. Environment, History and Philosophy, Physical 
l-J.ments and Systems, and Methods and Management). DF 101 and DF 102 satisfy this require- 
ment for the Communications and Graphics Core, DN 141 and DN 142 satisfy this requirement for 
the History and Philosophy Core. In the remaining cores the entry courses are designated by "2" as 
the first digit In the course number. Note: A student in this program must have an architecture 
faculty member as advisor. 

~ In order to receive two degrees from School of Design a student must complete 30 credit hours 
■bova the 129 hour requirement. These 30 hours are to include 18 credits in 400 level studio and 12 
credit* in core courses above those described above. 

90 



Landscape Architecture 

Brooks Hall 

Associate Professor A. Sullivan, Program Director 

Professor: R. R. Wilkinson; Professor Emeritus: E. G. Thurlow; Associate Professor: R. T. Hester Jr.; 
Assistant Professors: G. Gumz, L. Jewell, D. Wood; Lecturer: R. Stipe; Visiting Associate Pro- 
fessor: S. Baker; Associate Members of the Faculty: T. O. Perry (Forestry), J. C. Raulston (Hor- 
ticulture) 

Landscape architecture is the profession concerned with design and development 
of man-made features on the land and enhancement of the visual landscape, seeking 
to shape these features in concert with the natural environment. There are approxi- 
mately 8,000 practicing landscape architects in the United States whose activities 
range from site planning for urban complexes, community design, park and open 
space design, to campus planning and development of regional land management 
systems. U. S. Forest Service, National Park Service, city planning, state and 
local park agencies and private design offices are major employment sources. 
Types of work range from program development studies to detailed projects. The 
landscape architecture faculty is concerned with preparing students for professional 
careers. In addition, the faculty is committed to establishing a strong educational 
and intellectual base for each student facilitating his or her continued opportunity 
for growth. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates of the program with a Bachelor of Environmental Design in Land- 
scape Architecture gain employment with private offices practicing all phases of 
landscape architecture. Others gain employment with public agencies such as state 
park departments, community planning offices and environmental protection 
agencies. Many stay in North Carolina and participate in the expansion of the 
profession and its involvement in the development of the State. 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM CURRICULUM 

Degree: Bachelor of Environmental Design in Landscape Architecture 

FIRST YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

DF 101 Environ. Des. I 6 DF 102 Environ. Des. II 6 

DN 14 1 Hist, of Des. I 3 DN 142 Hist, of Des. II 3 

ENG 111 Comp. & Rhet 3 ENG 112 Comp. & Read 3 

Mathi 3 Math' 4/3 

Phy. Ed 1 Phy. Ed 1 

16 17/16 

SECOND YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio^ 6 Studio* 6 

Nat. Science Elec.3 4 Nat. Science Elec.3 4 

Soc. Sci./Hum. Elec.« 3 Soc. Sci./Hum. Elec.« 3 

Core* 3 Core* 3 

Phy. Ed _1 Phy. Ed 1 

17 T7 

THIRD YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio* 6 Studios 6 

Soc. Sci./Hum. « 3 Soc. Sci./Hum.* 3 

Advised Elec.& 3 Advised Elec. * 3 

Core* 3 Core* 3 

Core* 3 

18 15 

91 



FOURTH YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Advised Elec.» 3 Free Elec 3 

Free Elec 3 Free Elec 3 

Free Elec 3 Core* 3 

Core* 3 Core* 3 

Core* 3 Core* 3 

15 15 

Hours Required for Graduation 129 r 

VISUAL DESIGN OPTION 

The increasing importance of communication in our society has created a demand 
for designers who have operational knowledge and creative abilities in various 
visual media. The elements of this field were historically found in various crafts, 
skills, commercial and production art. These have been integrated into a new 
design discipline; and the scope of educational development includes typography, 
photography, illustration, printing, production materials and methods. The appli- 
cations include publication design (books, pamphlets and brochures), package 
design, signing and symbol design, advertising design (including newspapers, 
magazines, television and cinema), exhibit and display design. In relation to a 
broader view of the environment, the discipline includes the development of tech- 
niques for analyzing the visual character of our urban environment and its relation 
to social and behavioral functions; also, the exploration of visual means for solving 
socially defined problems. Working through a broad range of visual creative experi- 
ences, the student will develop an understanding of the elements and principles of 
organization common to all visual communication. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates with a Bachelor of Environmental Design in Product Design with the 
Visual Design Option pursue varied careers in professional design offices, corporate 
design offices, advertising agencies, corporations involved in printing, production, 
media development and communication. Others choose to enter graduate school for 
continued study in specific areas, both natural and man-made. 



i Must include one calculus course and may include one computer science course. May not include 

credit for Math 111. 
J A minimum of four 400 series studios are required with a minimum of three of the four being LAR 

400. The four studios may be taken at any time during the final six semesters; however, no more 

than one studio may be taken in any semester. 
3 Selected from natural, physical, or biological sciences, but not to includemath or computer science 

courses. 

* The University requires 18 hours in social science/humanities area. This requirement met by DN 
141, 142 in freshman year and 12 hours of electives. Courses not limited to any specific departments 
but may include any courses which have humanities or social science orientation — normally courses 
from Anthropology (ANT), Economics and Business (ACC, EB), Foreign Languages (GRK, LAT, 
FLF. FUG, FLI. FLR. FLS). History (HI), Literature (ENG), Philosophy (PHI), Political Science 
(PS). Psychology (PSY), Religion (RED, Social Work (SW), Sociology (SOC), and University 
Studies (UNI). 

s Advised electives are to be selected after consultation with the advisor. They may include studios 
and core courses from the School of Design or courses from the University at large but may not 
include credit for Art (ART), Military Science (AS, MS). Music (MUS) below 200 level, or Physical 
Education (PE). 

• Each landscape architecture student is required to take a minimum of one entry course in four of 
thf six cores (Graphics and Communications, Behavior, Environment, History and Philosophy, 
Physical Element* and Systems, and Methods and Management). DF 101 and DF 102 satisfy this 
requirement for the Communications and Graphics Core. DN 141 and DN 142 satisfy this require- 
ment for the History and Philosophy Core. In the remaining cores the entry courses are designated 
by "2" as the first digit in the course number. 

Note: A student in this program must also take the following which satisfy core requirements: 
DN 221/231. DN 430 (3 credits above entry level in Behavior Core, 3 credits above entry level in 
Environment Core), and either DN 443 or DN444. 
'In order to receive two degrees from School of Design a student must complete 30 credit hours 
above the 129 hour requirement. These 30 hours are to include 18 credits in 400 level studio and 12 
credits in core courses above those described above. 

92 



Product De§ign 

Associate Professor V. M. Foote, Program Director 

Associate Professor: J. Wittkamp; Assistant Professors: M. Aufmuth, A. V. Cooke, C. Kieffer; 
Instructor: J. DeMao 

Upon completion of design fundamental requirements, the student selecting the 
Product Design Program elects as a major area of concentration the product or 
visual design option. The product design option is concerned with all the human 
aspects of machine-made products and their relationship to the environment. In 
some areas, this design discipline is referred to as industrial design. The designer 
is responsible for the product's human engineering, safety, shape, color, texture, 
maintenance and cost. Product design deals with consumer products as well as 
industrial products. In order to achieve these ends, it is necessary for the designer 
to involve himself or herself in three major design and research activities: man's 
behavior; the man- product-machine relationship; the product itself. 

Areas of investigation include furniture, housewares, appliances, transportation, 
machine tools, farm equipment, medical electronic instruments, recreational sup- 
port equipment and others. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates with a Bachelor of Environmental Design in Product Design have 
career opportunities in three general areas: corporate design offices in manufac- 
turing companies, independent design offices, or governmental agencies. 

PRODUCT DESIGN PROGRAM CURRICULUM 

Degree: Bachelor of Environmental Design in Product Design 

FIRST YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

DF 101 Environ. Des. I 6 DF 102 Environ. Des. II 6 

DN 141 Hist, of Des. I 3 DN 142 Hist, of Des. II 3 

ENG 111 Comp. & Rhet 3 ENG 112 Comp. & Read 3 

Mathi 3 Mathi 4/3 

Phy. Ed 1 Phy. Ed 1 

16 17/16 



1 Must include one calculus course and may include one computer science course. May not include 
credit for Math 111. 

2 A minimum of four 400 series studios are required with a minimum of three of the four being PD 
400. The four studios may be taken at any time during the final six semesters; however, no more 
than one studio may be taken in any semester. 

3 Selected from natural, physical, or biological sciences, but not to include math or computer science 
courses. 

* The University requires 18 hours in social science/humanities area. This requirement may be met 
by DN 141, 142 in freshman year and 12 hours of electives. Courses not limited to any specific 
departments but may include any courses which have humanities or social science orientation — 
normally courses from Anthropology (ANT), Economics and Business (ACC, EB), Foreign Language 
(GRK, LAT. FLF, FLG, FLR, FLS), History (HI), Literature (ENG), Philosophy (PHI), Political 
Science (PS), Psychology (PSY). Religion (RED, Social Work (SW), Sociology (SOC). and University 
Studies (UNI). 

5 Advised electives are to be selected after consultation with the advisor. They may include studios 
and core courses from the School of Design or courses from the University at large but may not 
include credit for Art (ART), Military Science (AS, MS), Music (MUS) below 200 level, or Physical 
Education (PE). 

8 Each product design student is required to take a minimum of one entry course in four of the six 
cores (Graphics and Communications. Behavior, Environment, History and Philosophy, Physical 
Elements and Systems, and Methods and Management). DF 101 and DF 102 satisfy this requirement 
for the Communications and Graphics Core, DN 141 and DN 142 satisfy this requirement for the 
History and Philosophy Core. In the remaining cores the entry courses are designated by "2" as the 
first digit in the course number. Note: A student in this program must also take the following 
which satisfy the core requirements: DN 255 and DN 256. 

i In order to receive two degrees from School of Design a student must complete 30 credit hours 
above the 129 hour requirement. These 30 hours are to include 18 credits in 400 level studio and 12 
credits in core courses above those described above. 

93 



SECOND YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio* 6 Studios 6 

Nat. Science Elec.J 4 Nat. Science Elec.3 4 

Soc. Sci./Hum. Elec.« 3 Soc. Sci./Hum. Elec.« 3 

Core* 3 C° re * 3 

Phy. Ed. J. Phy. Ed _1 

17 17 

THIRD YEAR 

Fall Semi- Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio* 6 Studio* 6 

Soc. Sci./Hum.« 3 Soc. Sci./Hum.* 3 

Advised Elec.' 3 Advised Elec.s 3 

Gore* 3 C°re« 3 

Core* _3 _ 

18 15 

FOURTH YEAR 

Pall g Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Advised Elec.» 3 Free Elec 3 

Free Elec 3 Free Elec 3 

Free Elec 3 Core« 3 

Core" 3 Core* 3 

Core* 3 Core* _3 

15 15 

Hour9 Required for Graduation 129* 

PRODUCT DESIGNA ISUAL DESIGN OPTION 

Degree: Bachelor of Environmental Design in Product DesignA'isual Design Option 

FIRST YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

DF 101 Environ. Dea. I 6 DF 102 Environ. Des. II 6 

DN 14 1 Hist, of Des. I 3 DN 142 Hist, of Dea. II 3 

ENG 111 Comp. £ Rhet 3 ENG 112 Comp. & Read 3 

Mathi 3 Mathi 4/3 

Phy. Ed 1 Phy. Ed . . 1 

16 17/16 

SECOND YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Sprittg Semester Credits 

Studio' 6 Studio* 6 

Nat. Science Elec.3 4 Nat. Science Elec.3 4 

Soc. Sci./Hum. Elec* 3 Soc. Sci./Hum. Elec.< 3 

Core* 3 Core* 3 

Phy. Ed _1 Phy. Ed _1 

17 17 



i Must include one calculus course and may include one computer science course. May not include 

credit for Maty 111. 
' A minimum of four 400 series studios are required with a minimum of three of the four being PVD 

400. The four studios may be taken at any time during the final six semesters; however, no more 

than one studio may be taken In any semester. 
* Selected from natural, physical, or biological sciences, but not to include math or computer science 

courses. 
« The University requires 18 hours in social science/humanities area. This requirement met by DN 

141. 142 in freshman year and 12 hours of electives. Courses not limited to any specific departments 

but may include any courses which have humanities or social science orientation — normally courses 

from Anthropology (ANT). Economics and Business (ACC. EB). Foreign Languages (GRK, LAT. 

FLF. FLG. FLI. FLR. FLS). History (HI). Literature (ENG). Philosophy (PHI). Political Science 

<P8). Psychology (PSY). Religion (RED. Social Work (SW). Sociology (SOC). and University 

Studies (UNI). 

94 



THIRD YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio^ 6 Studio* 6 

Soc. Sci./Hum.* 3 Soc. Sci./Hum. < 3 

Advised Elec.s 3 Advised Elec.s 3 

Coare« 3 Core« 3 

Core* 3 

18 Ti 

FOURTH YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Advised Elec* 3 Free Elec 3 

Free Elec 3 Free Elec 3 

Free Elec 3 Cores 3 

Core* 3 Core* 3 

Core* 3 Core« 3 

Ti 16 

Hours Required for Graduation 129 



» Advised electives are to be selected after consultation with the advisor. They may include studios 
and core courses from the School of Design or courses from the University at large but may not 
include credit for Art (ART). Military Science (AS. MS), Music (MUS) below 200 level, or Physical 
Education (PE). 

• Each visual design student is required to take a minimum of one entry course in four of the six 
cores (Graphics and Communications, Behavior, Environment, History and Philosophy. Physical 
Elements and Systems, and Methods and Management). DF 101 and DF 102 satisfy this require- 
ment for the Communications and Graphics Core, DN 141 and DN 142 satisfy this requirement for 
the History and Philosophy Core. In the remaining cores the entry courses are designated by "2" 
as the first digit in the course number. Note: A student in this program must also take the following 
which satisfy the core requirements: DN 415 and DN 416. 

1 In order to receive two degrees from School of Design a student must complete 30 credit hours 
above the 129 hour requirement. These 30 hours are to include 18 credits in 400 level studio and 12 
credits in core courses above those described above. 

95 




A design student and professor 
examine the large scale interior 
view of a three dimensional model. 



Biological sciences students run a 
behavioral experiment with drugged 
Siamese fighting fish. 



0%£SK\ 


^a-%. m *PyW' ft 


$3ilsLJgi^r ' 




Kr~f-~-«J^i_^a^: 




/, : : Ti*S^ 


/4r,J 




lL- ? "-'jgyg 


^nyftj SkPSV ^B 


FvJ ^H 


mKm 



77ie School of Textiles equipment 
includes machines used in the pro 
cessing of both man-made and 
natural fibers. 




At his convenience, a student in the 
Education Curriculum Materials 
Center can "dial" a program pro- 
duced in another area or on film. 



96 




EDUCATION 

Poe Hall 

C. J. Dolce, Dean 

R. T. Williams, Associate Dean 

The School of Education is concerned with the problems of human development 
from both psychological and educational perspectives. With emphases upon the 
preparation of secondary and post-secondary school teachers, counselors, adminis- 
trators and psychologists, the school seeks students who are dedicated to the 
improvement of mankind through education and service and who are sensitive to 
the complexity of the teaching/learning processes. 

The School is composed of the Departments of Adult and Community College 
Education, Curriculum and Instruction, Mathematics and Science Education, 
Guidance and Personnel Services, Psychology and Occupational Education. The 
School also houses a national research center, the Center for Occupational Educa- 
tion. 

Undergraduate degree programs are offered in agricultural education, industrial 
arts education, vocational industrial education, technical education, mathematics 
education, secondary education, science education and psychology. 

Graduate degree programs are offered in adult and community college education, 
agricultural education, curriculum and instruction, educational administration and 
supervision, guidance and personnel services, industrial arts education, mathe- 
matics education, occupational education, psychology, science education, special 
education, and vocational industrial education. 

Graduates of the undergraduate programs in education receive a Bachelor of 
Science degree in education and normally qualify for an "A" Certificate to teach in 
their chosen fields. Graduates of the undergraduate program in psychology receive 
a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology degree. Graduate programs confer the Master of 
Science or Master of Education degrees, and the Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor 
of Education degrees. 

Professional education courses are provided for those students enrolled in the 
School of Liberal Arts who wish to become teachers of English, social studies, and 
modern foreign languages. Students enrolled in the School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences, and science or mathematics departments, may also double-major in the 
School of Education and obtain a North Carolina teacher's certificate. 

The modern School of Education building is named Poe Hall. It includes a cur- 
riculum materials center, an instructional materials production center, a computer 
facility, and a learning assistance center. The building houses laboratories for 
industrial arts, science, psychology, and guidance and testing activities, as well as 
a children's play area with an observation room. A closed circuit TV system with a 
studio has also been designed into the building. 

Adult and Community College Education 

(Also see Agriculture and Life Sciences.) 
Poe Hall and Ricks Hall 

Professor E. J. Boone, Head of the Department 
Professor Curtis Trent, Coordinator of Advising 

TEACHING, RESEARCH AND EXTENSION 

Professors: M. Burt, M. Knowles; Extension Professors: W. L. Carpenter, J. D. George; Adjunct 
Professors: B. E. Fountain Jr., I. E. Ready Sr. ; Associate Professors: J. C. Glass, W. L. Gragg, 
G. E. Parsons, R. W. Shearon; Extension Associate Professors: C. Black, M. Brown; Visiting 
Associate Professor: E. E. White; Assistant Professors: J. L. Compton, K. B. Segner III; Extension 
Assistant Professors: L. S. Brown, L. Hawkins, D. Proctor; Adjunct Assistant Professors: C. M. 
Barrett, C. J. Law Jr., J. R. Parrott Jr. 



97 



The adult and community college education faculty offers instruction at ad- 
vanced undergraduate and graduate levels. Advanced undergraduate courses are 
designed to support other departments of the institution, giving students a back- 
ground in adult and community college education. The department does not have a 
program leading to a bachelor's degree. 

The graduate program is designed to increase the professional competence of 
adult and community college educators in developing and administering adult and 
community college education programs and in conducting scholarly research in the 
field. For graduate degrees, see pages 12-13 and the Graduate Catalog. 

Agricultural Education 

Poe Hall 

Associate Professor J. R. Clary, Coordinator of Advising 

Prof en sots Emeriti: J. R. Kirkland, C. C. Scarborough; Associate Professors: C. D. Bryant, T. R. 
Miller; Adjunct Assistant Professor: W. R. Robinson 

Agricultural education, in its broadest sense, encompasses areas of study which 
will enable one to participate effectively in planning, promoting and initiating 
programs in education in agriculture. 

The department offers a program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. Pro- 
grams are designed for the teachers of vocational agriculture in the secondary 
schools, technical institutes and community colleges. For details of the master's 
degree programs (for degrees offered, see pages 12-13) consult the Graduate Catalog. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The demand for agricultural education teachers exceeds present supply. Gradu- 
ates who obtain certification in the Bachelor's degree program generally have a 
choice of positions in the Carolinas and Virginia and throughout the nation. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 Mathematics Elective** 3 

BS 100 General Biology 4 Poultry Science or Animal Science Elective . 4 

Plant Science Elective* 3-4 History Elective 3 

ED 102 Objectives in Agricultural Agricultural Elective 3-4 

Education 1 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 

16-17 17-18 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EB 201 Economics I or "B" Agricultural Elective 3 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 ED 313 Contemporary Vocational 

B AE 2 1 1 Farm Machinery 3 Agriculture 3 

Agricultural Elective 3-4 Agricultural Specialty*** 3-4 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

14-15 14-15 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ED 344 School and Society 3 SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 Literature Elective 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 PSY 376 Human Growth and Development 3 

Free Elective 3 Agricultural Specialty*** 3-4 

"A" or "B" Elective in Agriculture**** ... .3-4 Speech Elective 3 

ED 490 Senior Seminar in Agricultural 

Education 1 

15-16 17-18 

98 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ED 411H Student Teaching in Agriculture 8 Humanities Electives***** 6 

ED 412H Teaching Adults 2 Agricultural Specialty*** 3 

ED 413H Planning Educational Programs . 2 Political Science Elective 3 

SOC 416A Research Methods 3 Free Elective* 6 

16 18 

Hours Required for Graduation 126 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Associate Professor B. M. Parramore, Head 

Assistant Professor C. W. Harper Jr., Coordinator of Undergraduate Advising 

Adjunct Professor: T. L. Roundtree; Associate Professors: L. J. Betts Jr., S. D. Ivie, T. N. Walters; 
Adjunct Associate Professor: H. G. Royall Jr.; Associate Professor Emeritus: P. J. Rust; Assistant 
Professors: B. G. Beezer. B. J. Fox, C. W. Harper Jr., D. R. Kniefel, C. C. Mahmoud; Assistant 
Professor Emeritus: K. A. McCutchen; Instructor: D. D. Girardi; Teaching Technician: J. R. Gibson 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers foundation and general 
courses required for all teacher educational programs. This department advises all 
unclassified undergraduate education students while they remain unclassified, and 
therefore not in a degree-granting program. The department also offers the 
Secondary Education program which is described below. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The program in Secondary Education is designed to fulfill several objectives: 
Students who do not desire to teach, but who are interested in education as a field 
of study enroll in this program. The basic curriculum provides a relatively large 
number of free electives. Students who wish to prepare for teaching in newly- 
developing fields for which no teacher preparation programs have been developed 
may also select this program. This allows for the development of a particular 
specialty in depth, depending upon student interest. Those Liberal Arts students 
interested in preparing to be teachers of English (majors in English) and social 
studies (majors in history, sociology, economics and political science) may also 
declare a double major in order to receive a degree in education as well as in liberal 
arts. Students in English and social studies education follow basically the same 
programs of study as those enrolled in the School of Liberal Arts. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Students earning a degree in this program generally have the same options as 
graduates of related programs: teaching in secondary schools, graduate study, or 
employment in governmental and private agencies involved in formal or non-formal 
education. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers graduate programs de- 
signed to prepare directors of instruction/curriculum specialists related to the 
student's teaching field, and researchers in curriculum development and the 
teaching-learning process. For a list of graduate degrees see pages 12-13 and 
consult the Graduate Catalog. 



* Includes courses in crop science, horticulture or forestry. 
** Select from MA 102, 112, 114, 122. 
*** These three courses, when related to other ALS courses, should total a minimum of 12 semester 
hours for a "specialty" in ALS. 
**** Select from "A" or "B" electives in agriculture and related to "specialty." (Consult pages 00-00 

for listing of "A" and "B" courses in School of Agriculture and Life Sciences.) 
'**** Humanities electives should be selected from the areas of philosophy, religion, art, and/or 
music. 

99 



SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

MA 111 Algebra & Trigonometry 4 

History 3 

Social Science 3 

Physical Education 1 

14 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

History 3 

Social Science 3 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Fall Semester 

Literature 3 

Natural Science 3-5 

Speech 3 

PHI 205 Problems & Types of 

Philosophy 3 

Social Science 3 

Physical Education 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Literature 3 

Natural Science 3-5 

ED 205 Introduction to Teaching 

Humanities & Social Studies 3 

Electives 3 

Social Science 3 

Physical Education 1 



16-18 



16-18 



Fall Semester 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

ED 344 School & Society 3 

Natural Science 3-5 

Electives 3 

Social Science 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

PSY 376 Human Growth and 

Development 3 

ED (SOC) 318 Introduction to the 

Sociology of Education 3 

Electives 6 

Social Science 3 



15-17 



15 



Fall Semester 
PSY 370 



Psychology of Personality 

& Adjustment 3 

ED 483 An Introduction to Instructional 

Media 3 

ED (PHI) 304 Philosophy of Education ... 3 

Electives 6 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ED 496 Senior Seminar in Education 3 

3 ED 420 Principles of Guidance 3 

ED 440 Vocational Education 2 

Electives 6 



IS 



14 



Hours Required for Graduation . . . 124-128 



Special Education 

Assistant Professor C. C. Mahmoud, Coordinator of Advising 

Adjunct Associate Professor: H. G. Royall Jr.; Assistant Professor Emeritus: K. A. McCutchen 

The program in special education is designed for educators who wish to pursue 
advanced study relating to the learning problems and the education of children and 
youth. This program offers a general background in all areas of exceptionality, 
intellectual, physical and emotional, with specialization in mental retardation and 
sensory impairment. There is no undergraduate program in this field at North 
Carolina State University, but graduate degrees are offered. For further informa- 
tion consult the Graduate Catalog, pages 12-13. 



• This is a genera) program outline. Those seeking a double major follow the program outline listed 
for their academic area by Liberal Arts. 



100 



Education Administration and Supervision 

Professor C. J. Dolce, Coordinator of Advising 

Adjunct Professor: A. C. Phillips; Assistant Professors: D. R. Kniefel, R. T. Williams 

There is no undergraduate program in this field. Graduate programs are individu- 
ally designed by the student in consultation with the program staff (for degrees, 
see pages 12-13. These programs prepare the student for a variety of administra- 
tive, supervisory or policy-making roles. For further information consult the Gradu- 
ate Catalog. 

Guidance and Personnel Services 

Poe Hall 

Professor W. E. Hopke, Head of the Department and Coordinator of Advising 

Professor Emeritus: C. G. Morehead; Associate Professors: L. K. Jones, B. C. Talley Jr.; Assistant 
Professors: D. C. Locke, J. G. McVay; Adjunct Assistant Professors: M. A. Connors Jr., R. H. 
Massengill, C. L. Quinn 

The department offers work leading to graduate degrees (see pages 12-13) with 
a major in guidance and personnel services (or counselor education). The degrees 
are designed to prepare individuals for guidance and personnel positions at various 
levels in elementary and secondary schools, junior and community colleges, trade 
and technical schools and institutes, and other institutions of higher education. For 
further information consult the Graduate Catalog. 

Industrial Arts Education 

Poe Hall 

Associate Professor T. B. Young, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors Emeriti: I. Hostetler, D. W. Olson; Associate Professor: G. E. Baker; Assistant Professor: 
R. T. Troxler; Instructor: H. T. Leeper 

Industrial arts comprises that area of education which concerns itself with 
materials, processes and products of industry, including the graphical presentation 
of these. It is concerned with a study of changes made in materials to make them 
more useful and with problems related to these changes. 

The industrial arts education curriculum performs the function of preparing 
teachers and supervisors of industrial arts for secondary schools. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The graduates of the industrial arts program find opportunities for employment 
in the public schools. For graduate degrees offered see pages 12-13 and consult the 
Graduate Catalog. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

IA 111 Intro, to Industrial Arts 1 IA 122 Metal Technology I 3 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 SOC 202 Prin. of Sociology 3 

IA 115 Wood Processing I 3 MA Elective 3 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Humanities or Soc. Sciences 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

14 16 



101 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

IA 231 Industrial Arts Design or IA 246 Graphic Technology 3 

Approved Design Elective 3 PY 221 College Physics B 

CH 111 Foundations of Chemistry 4 PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

Literature Elective 3 ED 242 Intro, to Teaching Ind. Arts 3 

Economics Elective 3 Elective 3 

IA 233 Metal Technology II 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 

17 



18 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

IA 369 Electrical Technology I 3 ED 362 Phil. Curr. & Methods in 

PSY 376 Human Growth & Development . . 3 Industrial Arts 4 

IA 361 General Ceramics 3 IA 368 Technical Drawing II 3 

ED 344 School and Society 3 IA 364 Wood Technology II 3 

EJectives 6 IA 360 Electrical Technology II 3 

— Elective (Speech) 3 



18 



16 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ED 473 Student Teaching in Ind. Arts .... 8 IA Elective 3 

ED 479 Laboratory Planning & Mgmt 3 Political Scence or History 3 

IA 476 Power Technology 3 IA 480 Modern Industries 3 

— Humanities or Soc. Sci 6 

14 — 

15 

Hours Required for Graduation 128 

Industrial and Technical Education 

Poe Hall 

Professor D. M. Hanson, Coordinator of Advising 

Professor Emeritus: J. T. Nerden; Associate Professor: F. S. Smith; Assistant Professor: T. C. 
Shore Jr.; Instructor: W. M. Parker 

The Industrial and Technical Education program offers curricula to prepare 
teachers, supervisors and administrators for the public schools, area vocational 
schools, community colleges and technical institutes. Complete four-year curricula 
in vocational industrial education and technical education lead to the Bachelor of 
Science in education. The curricula are planned to provide students with broad 
cultural and professional backgrounds to parallel occupational experience. 

The program offers graduate degrees (see pages 12-13). For further information 
consult the Graduate Catalog. 

VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

The curriculum in vocational industrial education is designed to prepare voca- 
tional teachers for the secondary schools, area vocational schools and post-secondary 
school vocational programs. Upon satisfactory completion of the curriculum the 
luate is qualified to teach in any of the aforementioned vocational areas. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates of the vocational industrial education curriculum have a wide selec- 
tion of employment opportunities. The rapid growth of the vocational programs in 
the secondary schools in all fields has created an urgent demand for vocational 
teachers. A student may qualify for teaching positions in introduction to industrial 
education, trade preparatory training and industrial cooperative training in these 
fast-growing programs in the secondary schools. Other opportunities include teach- 
ing in the area vocational schools, in industry and in the post-secondary schools. 

102 



VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 



Fall Semester 

ED 100 Introduction to Industrial 

Education 2 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

MA 111 Algebra & Trigonometry 3-4 



MA 115 Introduction to Contemporary 

Mathematics 
CH 111 Foundations of Chemistry 4 

or Elective 
Physical Education 1 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

History Elective 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 122 Math of Finance 

or Mathematics Elective 3 

Drafting Elective 3-4 

Physical Education 1 

Elective 3 



13-14 



16-17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



Physics Elective 3-4 

Speech Elective 3 

PS 201 The American Governmental 

System 3 

Physical Education 1 

Electives 6 



16-17 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

EB 201 Economics I 3 

ED 305 Analysis of Technical Education 

Programs & Course Construction . . 3 
ED 327 History & Philosophy of Industrial 

& Technical Education 3 

PE 280 Emergency Medical Care and 

First Aid 2 

Physical Education 1 

Elective 3 



IK 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



ED 344 School & Society 3 

IE 355 Occupational Safety & Health 3 

ED 421 Principles & Practices in 

Industrial Cooperative 

Training 
or 
ED 405 Industrial & Technical 

Education Shop & Laboratory 

Planning 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance 3 

Elective 3 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



PSY 376 Human Growth and Development 3 
ED 428 Organization of Related Study 

Materials in Vocational Education 
or 
ED 405 Industrial and Technical Education 

Shop & Laboratory Planning 3 

ED 440 Vocational Education 2 

ED 422 Methods of Teaching Vocational 

Industrial/Technical Education ... 3 
ED 483 An Introduction to Instructional 

Media 3 

Elective 3 



18 



17 



Fall Semester 



ED 444 Student Teaching in Voc. 

Ind./Tech. Educ 8 

ED 457 Organization & Management of 

Youth Club Activities 3 

ED 496 Senior Seminar in Education 3 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Economics Elective 3 

Sociology Elective 3 

English Elective 3 

Elective 6 



11 



15 
Hours Required for Graduation 127 



Twelve hours of electives must be selected in accordance with the student's area of specialization 
and with the approval of the advisor. The remaining hours may be taken as free electives. 

TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

The curriculum in technical education is oriented toward preparing instructors 
within a wide range of teaching technologies and is closely coordinated with 
existing engineering curricula. A student enrolling in the technical education 
curriculum may specialize to some extent in areas related to interest and/or pre- 
vious work experience. Admission to the technical education curriculum is limited 
to students demonstrating proficiency in a given applied technology, i.e., electrical, 
electronics, mechanical, etc. 



103 



OPPORTUNITIES 

Employment opportunities for technical education graduates include teaching in 
the expanding community college complex, technical institutes, area vocational 
schools and within industry as instructors and coordinators of training programs. 
The growth of technical education in the nation and the large number of new tech- 
nical education facilities being constructed will require an increasing number of 
instructors to staff teaching positions. 

TECHNICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall SerruKli r Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 10] General Chemistry I 4 EB 201 Economics I 3 

ED 100 Introduction to Industrial ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Education 2 MA 102 Analytic Geometry and 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Calculus I 4 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 PS 201 The American Governmental 

Physical Education 1 System 3 

Physical Education 1 

14 



14 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Si mesU r Credits Spring Semester Credits 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

English Elective 3 FY 208 General Physics or 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & PY 212 General Physics 4 

Calculus II 4 Electives** 6 

PY 205 General Physics or Physical Education 1 

PY 211 General Physics 4 — 

Physical Education 1 14 

14 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ED 327 History & Philosophy of ED 305 Analysis of Technical Education 

Industrial & Technical Education . 3 Programs & Course Construction . . 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 SOC 401 Human Relations in Industrial 

S 5C 202 Principles of Sociology 3 Society 3 

L -ctives** 6 Electives** 9 

15 15 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ED 405 Industrial & Technical Education ED 444 Student Teaching in Voc. 

Shop and Laboratory Planning .... 3 Ind./Tech. Education 8 

ED 422 Methods of Teaching Industrial Electives** 7 

Subjects 3 — 

Electives** 9 15 

15 Hours Required for Graduation 116 

Mathematics and Science Education 

Poe Hall 

Professor H. E. Speece, Head of the Department and Coordinator of Advising 

Vr„u Uon: N. D. Anderson. L. M. Clark, J. R. Kolb; Associate Professors: R. D. Simpson. W. M. 
Waters Jr.. L. W. Watson; Associate Professor Emeritus: H. A. Shannon: Adjunct Assistant 
Mors: K. G. Blakeway, R. R. Jones. C. M. Meek 



* Students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in the applied technology of his or her choice — 
may be fulfilled by technical institute training or selected courses in addition to those required for 
the degree. 

Minimum of 27 hours of elective courses must be selected from engineering, engineering sciences, 
physical sciences, etc., in accordance with the student's area of specialization and with the 
approval of the adviser. Remaining hours may be taken from free electives. 

104 



The Department of Mathematics and Science Education offers a program for 
preparing undergraduate students as teachers of mathematics and science. The 
programs are designed to provide a broad background in the natural sciences, social 
sciences and humanities; depth in mathematics or an area of science; and the 
development of professional competencies needed by teachers entering the schools 
of today. The depth of preparation will enable students to pursue programs of 
graduate studies. (See pages 12-13 and the Graduate Catalog.) 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The demand for qualified mathematics and science teachers in our schools and 
colleges provides opportunities for mathematics and science education graduates. 
Developments in the schools and in our society accentuate the importance of 
preparation and competence in teaching, and this is reflected in increased salaries, 
opportunities for graduate study and professional advancement. 



MATHEMATICS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 



Fall Semester 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 



Credits 



ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

PHI 201 Lope 3 

MA 122 Math of Finance 3 

MA 102 Analytic Geom. & Calc. I 4 

Physical Education 1 

ED 101 Orientation 



14 



ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 201 Analytic Geom. & Calc. II 4 

History Elective 3 

tHuman/Soc. Sci. elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

CSC 111 Algroithmic Lang. I 2 

or 

CSC 101 Intro to Programming 3 



16-17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

MA 202 Analaytic Geom. & Calc. Ill 4 

•Science 4 

Literature elective 3 

ST 371 Intro. Prob. & Dist. Theo 2 

tHuman/Soc. Sci. elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

Math elective 3 

♦Science 4 

ST 372 Intro, to Stat. Inf. & Reg 2 

ED 203 Intro. Teaching Ma./Sci 3 

ED 203L Intro. Teaching Ma./Sci. Lab. . . 

Speech elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



Fall Semester 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



16 



Credits 



ED 10 1J Orientation 

MA 403 Intro, to Mod. Alg 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

Math elective 3 

"•Supporting elective 3 

tHuman/Soc. Sci. elective 3 

Elective 3 



ED 101J Orientation 

MA 408 Found. Euclidean Geom 3 

ED 344 School & Society 3 

MA 433 History of Mathematics 3 

••Supporting elective 3 

tHuman/Soc. Sci. elective 3 

PSY 476 Psych, of Adoles. Dev 3 



18 



18 



Fall Semester 

Sr. Seminar in Ma./Sci. Ed 1-3 

Methods of Teach. Math 3 

Stud. Teach, in Math 8 

Dev. & Sel. Tea. Mat. Ma 2 



ttED 495 
ttED 470 
ttED 471 
ttED 472 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spriiig Semester Credits 

••Supporting elective 3 

Math elective 3 

tHuman/Soc. Sci. elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



16 



15 
Hours Required for Graduation 129 

* Science must be 2-semester sequence in chemistry or physics. 
** Supporting electives must be an approved sequence in science, math, computer science, statis- 
tics, economics, philosophy, history of science, sociology, psychology. 

t The humanities/social sciences electives must be chosen so that 6 hours are in humanities and 9 
hours are in the social sciences. Humanities include: philosophy, religion, literature, fine arts, 
history, or foreign languages. Social sciences include: economics, sociology, anthropology, political 
science, psychology and geography. 
tt These courses are taken as a block in the professional semester. 

105 



SCIENCE EDUCATION CURRICULUM 



Fall S>mm(ir 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

AM 102 Analytic Geom. & Calc. I' 4 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 
ENG 112 Composition & Religion 3 



MA 112 Analytic Geom. & Calc. A 4 

CH 101 Gen. Chemistry I 4 

Humanities/Soc. Sciences* 3 

Physical Education 1 

ED 101 Orientation 

15 



MA 201 Analytic Geom. & Calc. II • 4 



or 



MA 212 
CH 103 



Analytic Geom. & Calc. B 3 

Gen. Chemistry II 4 



CH 107 Prin. Chem 4 

Biological Sci. elective 4 

Physical Education 1 



15-16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

PY 211 General Physics3 4 

Speech elective 3 

Required science 3 

Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

Humanities/Soc. Sci.* 3 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

PY 212 General Physics3 4 

ED 203 Intro. Teaching Math./Sci 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. 2 3 

Physical Education 1 

Required science* 6 

17 



Fall Semester 



PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. 2 3 

Required science* 7 

HI 321 Ancient & Med. Science 3 

or 

HI 322 Rise of Modern Science 3 

or 

PHI 405 Philosophy of Science 3 

16 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 

ED 344 School and Society 



Credits 



Humanities/Soc. Sci. 2 3 

Required science* 7 

PSY 476 Psych. Adol. Development 3 



16 



Fall Semester 



ED 475 Methods of Teach. Sci. 5 3 

ED 476 Student Teaching in Sci.s 8 

ED 477 Instructional Materials In Science . 2 

ED 495 Sr. Sem. in Math./Sci. Ed.» 2 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities/Social Sci. 2 6 

Electives 6 

Required science* 4 



L5 



16 



Hours Required for Graduation 127 



SCIENCE EDUCATION SPECIALIZATION REQUIREMENTS (27 hours) 

BIOLOGY SPECIALIZATION: 

Survey of Plant Life (BO 200) 4 General Microbiology (MB 401) 4 

Survey of Animal Life (ZO 201) 4 Plant Physiology (BO 421) 

Introductory Organic Chemistry (CH 220) . 4 or 

Genetics (GN 301 or GN 411, 412) 3-4 Vertebrate Physiology (ZO 421) 3-4 

Ecology (BO/ZO 360) 4 or 

Cell Biology (ZO/BO 414) 

1 Required of those specializing in Chemistry or Physics. 

2 To be selected as follows from the Humanities and Social Sciences: 

One course in history 3 B .h. 

One course in literature 3 8 j,. 

Two additional courses from any of the following humanities: 

Fine Arts, Foreign Language, History, Literature, Philosophy, Religion .... 6 s.h. 
Three courses from any of the following social sciences: 

Anthropology, Economics. Geography, Political Science. Scoiology, 

Psychology 9 8 h 

Student* may elect to take PY 205 and PY 208 or PY 201, 202. and 203 in lieu of PY 211-212. 
Students are required to take a minimum of 27 semester hours in one of four areas of specialization 
it.n.lngy. chemistry, physics, or earth science). 
> These courses are taken as a block in the professional semester (offered only during the fall 

semester for Science Education students) 
106 



CHEMISTRY SPECIALIZATION: 

Organic Chemistry 4 PY 223 Astronomy 3 

Analytic Chemistry 4 OY (MAS) 200 Introduction to the 

Physical Chemistry 4 Marine Environments 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Calculus Earth Science Electives 12 

III 4 

Earth Science Elective 3 PHYSICS SPECIALIZATION: 

Chemistry Electives 8 PY 223 Astronomy 3 

PY 407 Introduction to Modern Physics 

EARTH SCIENCE SPECIALIZATION: or 

GY 120 Physical Geology — GY 110 PY 203 General Physics 3-4 

Physical Geology Laboratory .... 3 MA 202 Analytic Geometry & 

GY 222 Historical Geology 3 Calculus III 4 

MY 201 Atmospheric Environment Earth Science Elective 3 

or Physics- Mathematics Electives 13-14 

MY 411 Introductory Meteorology 3 

Occupational Education 

Professor J. K. Coster, Coordinator of Advising 

Professor: D. M. Hanson; Professors Emeriti: I. Hostetler, J. B. Kirkland, J. T. Nerden, D. W. Olson, 
C. C. Scarborough; Adjunct Professor: B. E. Childers; Associate Professors: G. E. Baker, C. D. 
Bryant, J. R. Clary, T. R. Miller. F. S. Smith, T. B. Young; Adjunct Associate Professors: W. J. 
Brown Jr., C. H. Rogers; Assistant Professors: W. L. Cox Jr., T. C. Shore Jr.; Adjunct Assistant 
Professor: W. R. Robinson. 

Occupational education involves a study of the occupational structure of society, 
manpower requirements, and the functions of vocational education. 

There is no undergraduate program in occupational education. However, under- 
graduate courses are offered which support vocational education programs. The 
Division of Occupational Education offers programs which lead to graduate degrees 
(see pages 12-13). For further information consult the Graduate Catalog. 

Psychology 

Poe Hall 

Professor H. G. Miller, Head of the Department and Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: H. M. Corter, J. W. Cunningham, D. W. Drewes, J. C. Johnson, S. E. Newman, R. G. 
Pearson; Professor Emeritus: K. L. Barkley; Associate Professors: J. L. Cole, T. E. LeVere, 
J. E. R. Luginbuhl, R. F. Rawls, J. L. Wasik, B. W. Westbrook; Associate Professor Emeritus: 
J. W. Magill; Adjunct Associate Professors: B. A. Norton, R. W. Oppenheim. M. N. Wiebe; 
Assistant Professors: D. L. Chmielewski, V. G. Cowgell, P. D. Green, K. W. Klein, D. H. Mershon, 
F. J. Smith. L. S. Taylor; Adjunct Assistant Professors: B. C. Ball, B. F. Corder. C. L. Kronberg, 
L. D. Silber 

Psychology is one of the basic university disciplines. Mastery of some of the 
knowledge in psychology is necessary to practitioners in education, health, social 
service, social sciences and managerial professions. 

The undergraduate program in psychology consists of a general major and two 
optional programs — human resource development and experimental psychology. The 
general option is flexible and may be chosen by students who wish to prepare for 
entry into professional and graduate study. The program flexibility enables them 
to choose elective courses which prepare them for the graduate program of their 
interest. Human resource development is designed to educate students in specific 
psychology and human interaction skills which will qualify them to enter human 
development occupations upon graduation. The occupations may include corrections, 
mental health, education, etc. The experimental option emphasizes the development 
of competence in the use of the experimental method in accumulating scientific 
knowledge. In this option substantial work in physical science, biological science 
and mathematics is required. 

The Department of Psychology offers graduate programs (see pages 12-13). Por 
further information see the Graduate Catalog. 



107 



OPPORTUNITY 

Students holding the bachelor's degree in psychology and wishing to apply their 
psychological studies in a professional capacity generally continue their education 
in a graduate program such as clinical or experimental psychology, or in such fields 
as law, medicine, business, social work and a variety of other fields. Students in 
psychology may also choose to enter business or government, often without further 
training beyond the bachelor's degree. 

EXPERIMENTAL OPTION 

The Experimental Option is designed for those students who are interested in 
training in experimental psychology, either as preparation for graduate training in 
psychology or as preparation for other professional advanced training. 

The Experimental Option differs from the other options open to majors in 
psychology both in courses in the major area and in the distribution of require- 
ments. A strong background in mathematics and the physical and biological sciences 
is required of all students in the Experimental Option. In place of the Senior 
Seminar, currently required of other psychology majors, all students in the Experi- 
mental Option are required to take a sequence of laboratory courses in their junior 
and senior years to gain experience in the design and conduct of laboratory re- 
search in experimental psychology. 

REQUIREMENTS 

I. Major Area Courses: 

PSV 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

PSY 300 Perception 3 

PSY 310 Learning and Motivation 3 

PSY 320 Cognitive Processes 3 

PSY 400 Perception : Research Methods 3 

PSY 410 Learning and Motivation: Research Methods 3 

PSY 420 Cognitive Processes : Research Methods 3 

PSY 430 Neuropsychology: Research Methods 3 

PSY 505 History and Systems of Psychology 3 

27 

II. Mathematics and Science Courses: 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A (4) 

or MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I (4) 4 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry and Calculus B (3) 

or MA 201 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II (4) 3 

MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math, with Applications 3 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

CSC 101 Introduction to Programming (3) 

or CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I (2) 

or CSC 462 Computing for the Social Sciences (3) 2-3 

BS 100 General Biology (4) 

or BS 105 Biology in the Modern World (4) 4 

GN 4 1 1 The Principles of Genetics 3 

Chemistry or Physics (a two-semester sequence in either) 8 

30-31 

III. Humanities and Social Sciences 

Logic and Philosophy of Science (any two courses) 6 

Philosophy (one advised elective in addition to above) 3 

English Composition (normally ENG 111 and 112) 6 

English, American, or other Literature (two courses) 6 

History (two courses) 6 

Social Science, not including Psychology (two courses) 6 

33 

I V Physical Education 4 

V. Electives 

Advised Electives 12 

Free Electives 18 

30 

Hours Required for Graduation 124 



Mlh 



SAMPLE CURRICULUM: Experimental Option 



Fall Semester 

MA 112 Ana. Geom. Calc. A 

or MA 102 Ana. Geom. Calc. I 4 

BS 100 General Biology 

or BS 105 Bio. Mod. World 4 

ENG 111 Comp. and Rhetoric 3 

Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 212 Ana. Geom. Calc. B 

4 or MA 201 Ana. Geom. Calc. II .3-4 

PSY 200 Intro, to Psychology 3 

ENG 112 Comp. and Reading 3 

PHI Logic or Philosophy of Science 3 

Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



16-17 



Credits 



Fall Semester 

MA 114 Intro, to Finite Math with 

Applications 3 

Literature 3 

History 3 

PSY 300 Perception 3 

Physical Science I 4 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

Social Science* 3 

Literature 3 

History 3 

PHI Logic or Philosophy of Science 3 

Physical Science II 4 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Fall Semester 



PSY 310 Learning and Motivation 3 

PSY 400 Perception: Res. Meth 3 

GN 411 Princ. Genetics 3 

ST 311 Intro, to Stat 3 

Elective 3 



15 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 
PSY 320 Cognitive Processes 3 



PSY 410 Learn and Motiv: Res. Meth 3 

Elective (Advised) 3 

Computer Science 2-3 

Elective 3 



14-15 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester 

PSY 420 Cognit. Proc.Res. Meth 3 

Philosophy elective 3 

Social Science* 3 



Elective (Advised) 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Credits 

PSY 430 Neuropsy: Res. Meth 3 

PSY 505 Hist. & Syst. of Psych 3 

Elective (Advised) 3 



Elective (Advised) 3 

Elective 3 



Hours Required for Graduation 124 



HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT OPTION CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credits 

Mathematics 6 

English Composition 6 

History 6 

Sociology 3 



Biology 4 

Psychology 200 3 

Physical Education 2 

Elective 3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 

Natural Science 6-8 

Statistics 3 

Psychology & Social Science 9 

Philosophy 3 



English Literature 6 

Elective 3 

Physical Education 2 



32-34 



Not psychology 



109 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits 

Speech 881 :! 

Psychology 350 4 

Psychology 851 4 

Psychology 352 4 

15 

Psychology 198 4 

Psychology 196 8 

12 
27 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credit 8 

Psychology 491 3 

Psychology 492 3 

Philosophy 3 

Electives 24 

33 

Hours Required for Graduation 125 



PSYCHOLOGY: GENERAL CURRICULUM 



Fall Simmtrr 

Mathematics 3-4 

English Composition 3 

Biological Science 4 

Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Mathematics 3-4 

English Composition 3 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

Philosophy 3 

Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



14-15 



16-17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

PSY 210 Psychological Analysis Applied 

to Current Problems 3 

Natural Science 3-4 

History 3 

Sociology 3 

Psychology Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



16-17 



Spring Semester Credits 

PSY 300 Perception 3 

Natural Science 3-4 

History 3 

Statistics 3 

Psychology Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



16-17 



Fall Semt »U i 



PSY 310 Learning & Motivation 3 

Literature 3 

Social Science 3 

•Electives 6 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 
PSY 320 Cognitive Processes 3 



Literature 3 

Social Science 3 

•Electives 6 



IS 



16 



Fall Si meeU r 



PSY 491 Seminar in Psychology 3 

Philosophy 3 

Social Science 3 

•Electives 6 



16 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 
PSY 492 Seminar in Psychology 3 



Elective 3 

♦Electives 9 



15 
Hours Required for Graduation 124 



Advised Electives 



Special Education 

(See Curriculum and Instruction, page 99.) 



110 



ENGINEERING 

Riddick Hall 

R. E. Fadum, Dean 

J. F. Ely, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 

H. B. Smith, Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies 

J. R. Hart, Assistant Dean for Extension 

The engineer has the responsibility and obligation to use knowledge in his field 
for the benefit of mankind. Today, a new sense of responsibility has been imposed 
upon the engineer because of the impact of science and technology. 

Engineering studies are important to those young men and women who look to 
industry, engineering education, or research and development for a career. These 
ambitions can well be furthered by the School of Engineering through its under- 
graduate or graduate programs, where students are offered technical instruction 
and leadership guidance by an experienced staff of qualified engineering educators. 

The School of Engineering is organized into eight departments: biological and 
agricultural, chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, materials, mechanical and aero- 
space, and nuclear. Undergraduate degree programs are offered in all departments 
listed. In addition, a degree in engineering operations is offered through a cur- 
riculum coordinator. Most teaching departments offer advanced studies leading to 
the professional degree, the master's degree and the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 
See pages 12-13 for a complete list. 

A career guidance and placement office is maintained by the University to assist 
graduating students and alumni. 

The School of Engineering's curricula more than meet the standards of the 
Engineers' Council for Professional Development. It is the ambition of the school 
that these curricula and programs meet the needs of the people and industries of 
the state and region through effective instruction, competent research and develop- 
ment and worthwhile contributions to engineering knowledge. 

CURRICULA AND DEGREES 

The freshman year is the same in all engineering curricula. Entering students 
are assigned to the Freshman Engineering and Student Services Division where 
each student is given advice in planning an appropriate program of study. Although 
the entering student may indicate a curriculum choice, he or she may wait until 
the end of the first year when one is in a better position to judge which engineering 
branch of study is most suited to one's own interests and talents. 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering — The four-year program provides prepara- 
tion for graduate school or to meet the needs of young people who will go into 
industry in the fields of design, development, production, sales, application, and 
planning and operation of industrial units. 

The four-year curricula offer programs of study leading to a bachelor's degree in 
aerospace, biological and agricultural, chemical, civil, electrical, engineering 
operations, industrial, materials, mechanical and nuclear engineering.* Construc- 
tion engineering is an option in civil engineering. Graduation requirements are the 
satisfactory completion of the electives and required courses in any one curriculum 
which amount to 125 to 130 semester hours. University regulations allow a maxi- 
mum of twelve hours of "D" grades to be counted towards graduation requirements. 
Of this number, a maximum of six hours may be in engineering courses. 



* ENGINEERING SCIENCE AND MECHANICS — Students enrolled in Engineering Science and 
Mechanics prior to July 1. 1976 should consult the 1975-77 Undergraduate Catalog for the curricu- 
lum requirements for a bachelor's degree in Engineering Science and Mechanics. 



Ill 



Specialized Degree — A specialized Bachelor of Science degree is offered through 
a program of study in furniture manufacturing and management. This four-year 
curriculum is offered through the Department of Industrial Engineering. 

Joint Liberal Arts-Engineering Program — Students may wish to combine a 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering with either a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor 
of Arts in Liberal Arts. When the two are carried along together, the double degree 
program can be completed in five years. Those interested should contact the Fresh- 
man Engineering and Student Services Division and the Dean of Liberal Arts. 

Professional Degree in Engineering — The School of Engineering offers profes- 
sional curricula leading to the degrees Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electri- 
cal Engineer, Industrial Engineer, Materials Engineer, Mechanical Engineer and 
Nuclear Engineer. A program of study is designed to fit the needs of students 
desiring intensive specialization in a particular field or additional work not 
ordinarily covered in the normal four-year undergraduate curricula. 

Professional course work is emphasized rather than research. The curriculum 
consists of a minimum of 30 credits making up a planned program designed to fit 
the student's objective. Typical programs are available in the various depart- 
mental offices. 

ADMISSION 

Applicants who hold the bachelor's degree in engineering will be admitted to the 
professional program of the School of Engineering upon presentation of official 
credentials. For unconditional admission, these credentials must show the com- 
pletion, with a minimum grade-point average of 2.5 (C + ), of an amount of under- 
graduate work in the proposed field of professional study corresponding to that 
normally required for a bachelor's degree in that field. 

Admission on a provisional basis may be granted applicants who do not meet 
the formal requirements. In case of insufficient preparation, prerequisite courses 
will be prescribed in addition to the normal program requirements. 

Application should be filed in the office of the dean of the School of Engineering 
at least 30 days in advance of the semester in which admission is sought. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

The following regulations of the School of Engineering will be observed: 

1) An undergraduate enrolled at North Carolina State University who plans to 
undertake a professional program and who has fulfilled all requirements for the 
bachelor's degree, except for a few courses, may be permitted to enroll in courses for 
credit toward the professional degree provided the student has given notice of his 
purpose to the dean of the School of Engineering. 

2) A limited amount of credit to be applied toward the requirements for the pro- 
fessional degree may be transferred to N. C. State from other institutions offering 
advanced work in engineering. Transfer of credit must be recommended by the head 
of the department in which the student does his major work and approved by the 
Dean of Engineering. 

3) Professional students are classified as post-baccalaureate students and are 
subject to rules and regulations established by the Dean of Engineering. 

4) Grades for completed courses are reported to the Dean of Engineering and to 
Registration and Records. A minimum grade of "C" must be made in each course 
to obtain credit. A quality point average of 2.5 (C + ) in all course work must be 
attained to satisfy requirements for a professional degree. 

5) Work completed more than six years prior to the date on which the profes- 
sional degree is to be granted may not be used as credit toward the professional 
degree, unless approved by the head of the department concerned and the Dean of 
Engineering. 

6) Each professional student will be assigned an adviser in his or her major area. 
The adviser assists the student in preparing a program of study and counsels him 
or her in academic work. The student is required to prepare, with adviser's as- 

ee, a complete plan of study before the end of the first semester in residence. 
This program of study is subject to approval by the Dean of Engineering. 



112 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The Engineering Honors Program provides enriched educations for academically 
talented juniors and seniors. The opportunities which distinguish this program from 
standard programs of study are: 1) considerable flexibility in designing individual 
programs, 2) special courses for honors students, 3) special seminars, 4) individual 
study or research with a personally chosen professor. Each department has an 
honors adviser who can provide further information. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

A program of cooperative education began in 1968-69 in Engineering. The 
optional program is planned such that the student may alternate semesters of study 
with semesters of work during the sophomore and junior academic levels. The 
freshman and senior years are spent on campus while the sophomore and junior 
academic levels are spread over a three-year period to permit the interfacing of 
the academic semesters with practical work experience semesters. The co-op plan 
requires five years for completion during which time the student receives approxi- 
mately 18 months of practical experience. 

Students in all curricula in Engineering may participate if they have a grade- 
point average of 2.25 or better. After a student is accepted, he or she is expected 
to maintain at least a 2.00 grade-point average. Application for admission into the 
co-op program should be made early in the fall semester of the freshman year; 
however, later applications resulting in fewer work semesters prior to graduation 
will be considered during the sophomore year or the first semester of the junior 
year. Further information may be obtained from the Director of Cooperative Engi- 
neering Education, 236 Riddick Building. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Each curriculum in the School of Engineering has a technical society open to 
every student enrolled in the curriculum. In most cases, these are student chapters 
of national professional organizations. Each department also has one or more honor 
societies to give recognition to those with superior academic records. All students 
are encouraged to participate in these activities as part of their professional 
education. These organizations together form the Engineers' Council, the coordi- 
nating agency for students in their school-wide activities such as Open House and 
St. Patrick's Day Dance. 

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The educated engineer has a foundation in humanities and social sciences as well 
as in technical studies. Each student in Engineering is required to take a minimum 
of 18 hours of humanities and social sciences, approved by his or her adviser, and 
make up as follows: 

One beginning course in economics (usually EB 201) 

One beginning course in history 

One beginning course in literature; suggested courses are: 

ENG 205 Studies in Great Works of Literature 

ENG 206 Studies in Drama 

ENG 207 Studies in Poetry 

ENG 208 Studies in Fiction 
One course in the history or philosophy of science; suggested courses are: 

HI 321 Ancient and Medieval Science 

HI 322 Rise of Modern Science 

HI 341 Technology in History 

PHI 405 Philosophy of Science 

UNI 301 Science and Civilization 

UNI 302 Contemporary Science and Human Value 



NOTE: The 18 hours humanities-social science series are NOT FREE ELECTIVES; therefore, by 
University rules. CANNOT be taken on a pass/fail basis. Free elective courses in the 
humanities and social sciences field, however, can be taken on a pass/fail basis. 



113 



Other courses may be chosen from the list below. Students are encouraged to 
combine courses into a two or three course set, thus providing depth in one area. 

Consideration will be given to courses not on the list if a student has a special 
interest. In selecting courses the student should check carefully to be sure he or 
she has the appropriate prerequisites. 

LIST OF COURSES 

Anthropology Courses 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 

ANT 305 Peoples of the World 

Economics Courms 

EB 201 Economics I 

EB 301 Production and Prices 

EB 302 Aggregate Economic Analysis: Theory & Policy 

EB 304 Financial Institutions 

EB iHI) 370 Rise of Industrialism 

EB (HI) 371 Evolution of the American Economy 

EB 410 Public Finance 

EB 413 Competition. Monopoly, and Public Policy 

EB 431 Labor Economics 

EB 440 Economic Development 

EB 442 Evolution of Economic Ideas 

EB 448 International Economics 

EB 475 Comparative Economic Systems 

With consent of instructor. EB 201 may be. accepted as a prerequisite for all courses now 

requiring EB 202. 

Genetics Courses 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 

GN 504 Human Genetics 

Htstory Courses 

All undergraduate history courses except HI 492 are appropriate. 

Literature Courses 

ENG 205 Studies in Great Works of Literature 

ENG 206 Studies in Drama 

ENG 207 Studies in Poetry 

ENG 208 Studies in Fiction 

ENG 261 English Literature I 

ENG 262 English Literature II 

ENG 265 American Literature I 

ENG 266 American Literature II 

ENG 346 Literature of the Western World I 

ENG 347 Literature of the Western World II 

ENG 371 The Modern Novel 

ENG 372 Modern Poetry 

ENG 398 Contemporary Literature I — 1900-1940 

ENG 399 Contemporary Literature II — 1940 to present 

ENG 453 The Romantic Period 

ENG 46h American Romanticism 

ENG 469 American Realism and Naturalism 

ENG 485 Shakespeare 

Foreign languages and Literatures Courses 

Any 201 or higher numbered courses, except 401-402. in any language or literature is appropriate. 

Music Courses and Art Courses 

MUS 200 Understand ing Music 

MUS 210 A Survey of Music in America 

MUS 215 Music of the 17th and 18th Centuries 

MUS 220 Music of the 19th Century 

MUS 320 Music of the 20th Century 

ART 200 The Visual Arts in Contemporary Life 

Philosophy Courses 

PHI 300 Early Western Philosophy 

PHI 301 Modern Western Philosophy 

PHI 305 Philosophy of Religion 

PHI 306 Philosophy of Art 

PHI 307 Morality and Human Happiness 

PHI 30K Contemporary Moral Philosophy 



114 



PHI 309 Contemporary Political Philosophy 

PHI 310 Existentialism 

PHI 333 Theory of Knowledge 

PHI 335 Symbolic Logic 

PHI 402 Advanced Logic 

PHI 405 Philosophy of Science 

Political Science 

All political science courses are appropriate. 

Psychology Courses 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 

PSY 210 Psychological Analysis Applied to Current Problems 

PSY 370 Psychology of Personality and Adjustment 

PSY 411 Social Psychology 

Religion Courses 

REL 300 Introduction to Religion 

REL 311 The Hebrew Bible 

REL 312 Christian Origins 

REL 315 Western Religions of the Reformation 

REL 316 Western Religions Since the Reformation 

REL 321 Religion in American Life 

REL (ENG) 325 Religion and the Modern Literary Imagination 

REL 327 Contemporary Religious Thought 

REL 331 Hinduism and Islam 

REL 332 Buddism 

Sociology Courses 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 

SOC 302 Mass Communications and Modern Society 

SOC 303 Current Social Problems 

SOC 304 Contemporary Family Life 

SOC 305 Race Relations 

SOC 306 Criminology 

SOC 401 Human Relations in Industrial Society 

SOC 402 Urban Sociology 

SOC 451 Population and Public Affairs 

Speech-Communication Courses 

SP 340 Play Production 

SP 420 Development of Rhetorical Theory 

SP 430 History and Criticism of American Public Address 

University Studies Courses 

UNI 301 Science and Civilization 

UNI 302 Contemporary Science and Human Values 

UNI 303 Man and His Environment 

UNI 323 World Population and Food Prospects 

UNI 401 The Urban Crisis 

UNI 402 Peace and War in the Nuclear Age 

UNI 495 Special Topics in University Studies 

UNI 595 Special Topics in University Studies 

Courses concerned with Man and with the Environment 

(See also courses in anthropology, genetics and university studies.) 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource Management 

FOR 572 Conservation Policy Issues 

NTR (FS, ANS) 301 Nutrition and Man 

ZO 400 Biological Basis of Man's Environment 



Freshman Engineering and Student Services Division 

Associate Professor R. H. Hammond, Director and Coordinator of Advising 

Assistant Professors: R. J. Leube, W. J. Vander Wall; Senior Advisers: G. K. Hilliard Jr.. B. Houck 
Jr.; Instructors: J. L. Crow, G. A. Finley. J. F. Freeman, J. P. Newby, B. D. Webb 

All students in their first year in the School of Engineering are required to take 
the same general program of courses. The Freshman Engineering and Student 
Services Division advises all freshman students on academic affairs and arranges 

115 



a program of courses which best suits one's individual background and talents and 
permits one the greatest probability of academic success. This division also offers 
general counseling service to all engineering students. 

Although an entering student may designate the curriculum he or she proposes 
for a major, it is not necessary to decide upon a major until the end of the freshman 
year. As each student earns 28 or more credits, they are transferred to the depart- 
ment of his or her choice. This normally is achieved at the end of the spring 
semester. 

The Freshman Engineering and Student Services Division offers assistance to 
high schools on questions involving engineering as a career. However, its major 
function is guiding and counseling each freshman engineering student. 

TYPICAL FRESHMAN YEAR IN ALL ENGINEERING CURRICULA 

Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 105 Chemistry — Principles and Applications* 3 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

E 120 Engineering Concepts 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading** 3 

Humanities — Social Science*** 3 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 4 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 2 

32 

The program above is typical. Other courses may be substituted, added, or 
deleted, dependent upon each student's individual background and talents. Indi- 
vidual programs might range from 28 to 35 credits. 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

(Also see Agriculture and Life Sciences.) 
David S. Weaver Laboratories 
Professor F. J. Hassler, Head of the Department 
Professor G. B. Blum Jr., Coordinator of Advising 

(For a list of faculty, see Agriculture and Life Science, page 58.) 

Students in biological and agricultural engineering train to deal with problems 
of agriculture that are engineering in nature. Scientific and engineering principles 
are applied to the conservation and utilization of water and soil, the development of 
power and labor-saving devices for all phases of agricultural production, the design 
of structures and equipment for housing and handling livestock and field products, 
and the processing and marketing of farm products. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Biological and agricultural engineers are qualified for positions in design, de- 
velopment and research in public institutions and in industry, and for teaching 
and extension work in institutions of higher education. The curriculum provides 



Those students who intend to major in chemical engineering or who expect to take additional 
^chemistry courses will take CH 107. Principles of Chemistry, instead of CH 105. 
••Qualified students will be offered an advanced placement course, ENG 112H. If a grade of "C" 
or better is achieved, credit is also given for ENG 111. Qualified students will be notified by the 
Registrar and during freshman orientation. Other students will be required to take the ENG 
111. 112 sequence. In neither case may credits for ENG 111 be used towards graduation require- 
ments. 

•* The humanities or social science courses usually suggested are HI 205, Western Civilization 
Since 1400. or EB 201. Economic Activity. 



116 



adequate training for postgraduate work leading to advanced degrees (see pages 
12-13). Graduates receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in biological and 
agricultural engineering. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The science curriculum in biological and agricultural engineering develops young 
people capable of engineering leadership in agriculture. Emphasis is placed on basic 
science courses such as mathematics, physics, mechanics, biology, soils, and thermo- 
dynamics, which provide a sound background for engineering and agricultural 
technology. Courses in biological and agricultural engineering are directed to those 
methods of thought and techniques whereby science can be applied with under- 
standing and judgment to engineering situations related to agricultural operations. 

Since training in biological and agricultural engineering involves two distinct 
technical fields — agriculture and engineering — the science curriculum is a joint 
responsibility of the two schools and is so administered. Undergraduate students 
may officially enroll in either school; duplicate undergraduate records are main- 
tained. 

BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



MA 202 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

ESM 205 Principles of Engineering 

Mechanics 3 

BAE 251 Elements of Biological & 

Agricultural Engineering 3 

CSC 111 Algroithmic Languages I 2 

Physical Education 1 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

ESM 307 Solid Mechanics I 3 

EE 331 Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 3 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

Social Sciences & Humanities Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



ESM 305 Engineering Dynamics 3 

BAE 391 Electrotechnology in Biological 

& Agricultural Engineering 3 

BAE 361 Analytical Methods 3 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I . 3 

BS 100 General Biology 4 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

Agricultural Processing 4 

Functional Design of Field 

Machines 3 

Agricultural Structures & 

Environment 3 

Social Sciences & Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



16 



BAE 342 
BAE 462 



BAE 381 



Fall Semester 



BAE 451 Agricultural Engineering 

Design I 3 

BAW (SSC) 471 Agricultural Water 

Management 4 

Social' Science & Humanities Elective 6 

Free Elective 3 



16 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 

BAE 452 Agricultural Engineering 



Credits 



Design II 3 

Advised Technical Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Social Science & Humanities Electives 6 



15 



Hours Required for Graduation 129 



The curricula above is for the science program in biological and agricultural 
engineering. For the technology curriculum, see Agriculture and Life Sciences. 



Social Science and Humanities Electives will be selected from the standard engineering school 
listing. 



117 



Chemical Engineering 

Riddick Hall 

Professor J. K. Ferrell, Head of the Department 

Professor J. F. Seely, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors. K. O. Beatty Jr., R P. Gardner, H. B. Hopfenberg, D. C. Martin, E. P. Stahel, V. T. 
Stannett: Professors Emeriti: R. Bright, W. L. McCabe. E. M. Schoenborn Jr.; Adjunct Professors: 
A. R Berens. D. M. Preiss. D. R. Squire; Associate Professors: R. M. Felder, D. B. Marsland, 
R W. Rousseau. M. R. Overcash; Adjunct Associate Professor: T. R. Hauser; Assistant Professors: 
J. E. Helt, H. M. Winston; Adjunct Assistant Professor: J. L. Williams 

Chemical engineering is concerned with the design, optimization and control of 
processes, equipment and plants in which chemical and physical transformations 
of matter are carried out. Typical industries relying upon chemical engineering 
include those producing chemicals, polymers, synthetic fibers, metals, drugs, glass, 
food, gasoline, rocket fuels, paper, soap and cement; those producing energy from 
nuclear fuels; and those processing materials by methods involving chemical 
reactions. 

Real progress in pollution abatement and control must come through the applica- 
tion of chemical engineering techniques. Chemical engineers are qualified to pursue 
careers in industries such as these in addition to traditional jobs. Biomedical 
engineering, pollution abatement and control, and engineering for the nation's 
energy requirements are other areas. 

FACILITIES 

Chemical engineering laboratories include pilot plant-type equipment for studying 
the principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, distillation, absorption, drying, crushing 
and grinding, filtration, chemical reaction kinetics, etc. Emphasis is placed on the 
use of both digital and analog computers in the solution of typical chemical engi- 
neering problems. Special equipment for research and instructional purposes is 
designed and built in the departmental laboratories. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates find employment in research and development; production, operation 
and maintenance; management and administration; inspection, testing and process 
control; technical service and sales; estimation and specification writing; consult- 
ing and teaching, and many others. Students desiring to pursue careers in research 
and development or in teaching and consulting work are advised to consider 
graduate training (see pages 12-13). 

CURRICULUM 

The chemical engineer's work is so diversified that one's education must be broad 
and basic. The spirit of research and experimentation is vital, so students need to 
acquire sound scientific backgrounds essential to original thought and independent 
accomplishment. The undergraduate curriculum emphasizes the engineering, chemi- 
cal and economic principles involved in chemical processes and operations. The 
work in chemistry including inorganic, analytical, physical and organic chemistry 
is comparable to that usually given to chemists with the exception of a reduction 
of time devoted to laboratory work. Mathematics and science are also stressed. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall SrmtHt.r Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 EE 331 Principles of Elec. Engr 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III . 4 Humanities & Soc. Sciences 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

CHE 205 Chemical Process Principles 4 CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems 4 

Physical Education ! MA 301 Appl. Differential Eq. I 3 

— Physical Education 1 

17 _ 

118 18 






JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CHE 330 Chemical Engr. Lab I 2 CH 495 Speical Topics in Physical 

CHE 315 Chemical Process Thermo- Chemistry 3 

dynamics 3 CHE 327 Separation Processes I 3 

CHE 311 Transport Processes I 3 CHE 331 Chemical Engr. Lab II 2 

Humanities & Soc. Sciences 3 Humanities & Soc. Sciences 3 

MAT 201 Structure & Properties CHE 316 Thermodynamics of Chemical 

of Engr. Materials 3 & Phase Equilibria 3 

Free Elective 3 — 

— 14 
17 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Free Elective 3 CHE 451 Chemical Engr. Design 3 

CHE 432 Chemical Engr. Lab III 2 Approved Chem. Engr. Elective 3 

CHE 495 Seminar 1 Humanities & Soc. Sciences 3 

CHE 446 Chemical Process Kinetics 3 CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

CHE 425 Process Measurement Free Elective 3 

& Control 3 — 

Humanities & Soc. Sciences 3 16 

15 Hours Required for Graduation 130 

Civil Engineering 

Mann Hall 

Professor D. L. Dean, Head of the Department 

Professor P. Z. Zia, Associate Head of the Department and Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: M. Amein, W. F. Babcock, T. S. Chang, P. D. Cribbins, R. A. Douglas, J. F. Ely, R. E. 
Fadum, W. S. Galler, K. S. Havner, C. L. Heimbach, A. I. Kashef, L. J. Langfelder, P. H. Mc- 
Donald, W. G. Mullen, C. Smallwood Jr., C. C. Tung, M. E. Uyanik. H. E. Wahls; Professor 
Emeritus: C. R. Bramer; Associate Professors: G. H. Blessis, W. L. Bingham. E. D. Gurley, 
Y. Horie, J. L. Machemehl, J. F. Mirza, S. W. Nunnally, F. A. Rihani, J. C. Smith; Adjunct 
Associate Professors: C. P. Fisher, N. A. Jaworski, D. R. Johnston, S. D. Shearer; Associate 
Professor Emeritus: G. R. Taylor; Assistant Professors: J. L. Hulsey, H. R. Malcom Jr.; Visiting 
Assistant Professor: B. D. Barnes: Adjunct Assistant Professor: M. T. Mettrey; Extension Specialist: 
R F. DeBruhl 

Civil engineering is one of the broadest of the various fields of engineering. It is 
a discipline traditionally concerned with the improvement and control of environ- 
ment and dealing with the planning, design and construction of buildings, dams, 
bridges, harbor works, water works, water and nuclear power facilities, sewage 
disposal works, nuclear waste facilities, and transportation systems including 
highways, railways, waterways, airports and pipe lines. Graduates in civil engi- 
neering are in demand by public agencies and by private industries. Employ- 
ment varies from assignments in design offices or in the field, in small communi- 
ties or large industrial centers. 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers programs of study which provide 
adequate academic preparation to those contemplating a career in the civil engi- 
neering profession. The undergraduate program provides a sound general education 
and prepares the student for advanced study either by graduate study (see degrees 
offered, pages 12-13) or by self-study. 

FACILITIES 

Learning is facilitated by laboratories for testing structural materials, large 
models or full-scale structures, soils and bituminous products, for hydraulic experi- 
ments, for studies in airphoto interpretation and photogrammetry, for analysis of 
small structural models, for chemical and biological tests pertaining to sanitary 
engineering, and for the investigation of transportation problems. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

Two four-year undergraduate curricula are offered; one leads to a Bachelor of 

119 



Science in civil engineering; the other, to a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering, 
construction option. 

The civil engineering curriculum is a balanced program providing academic 
discipline in the pure and applied physical sciences, the humanities and social 
sciences, and the professional aspects of civil engineering including structural, 
transportation and sanitary engineering, and soil mechanics and foundations. 

The curriculum in the civil engineering construction option is designed for those 
interested in the construction phases of civil engineering. It includes the core 
course requirements in the physical sciences and the social sciences and humanities 
as established for all N. C. State engineering curricula. The curriculum includes 
a three semester sequence of courses in cost analysis and control, and construction 
methods and planning. The courses, unique to this curriculum, are designed to 
provide academic discipline in the engineering, planning and management aspects 
of construction. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 



Fail Semester 

CE 202 Introduction to Civil 

Engineering* 3 

ESM 200 Introduction to Mechanics 3 

MA 202 Geometry & Calculus III 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Credits 

2 

1 



Spring Semester 

GY 120 Elements of Physical Geology 
GY 110 Physical Geology Laboratory* 
MAT 200 Mechanical Properties of 

Structural Materials 2 

E 301 Mechanics of Solids 3 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



May be taken in reverse semesters. 



Fall Semester 



CE 301 Engineering Surveying 3 

CE 325 Structural Analysis 3 

CE 332 Materials of Construction 3 

CE 382 Hydraulics 4 

IE 311 Engineering Project Analysis 3 



18 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CE 305 Transportation Engineering I 4 

CE 326 Structural Engineering I 4 

CE 342 Soils Engineering I 4 

CE 383 Water Resource Engineering I . . . . 4 



16 



16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE Electives* \ 6 

Engineering Science Elective*** 3 

Free Elective 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

CE 450 Civil Engineering Design 3 

CE Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 6 



15 15 

Hours Required for Graduation 129 



CONSTRUCTION OPTION CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 



• Humanities and social science courses to be selected from the standard school pattern. 
Two courses selected from: CE 406 Transportation Engineering II 
CE 427 Structural Engineering II 
CE 443 Soils Engineering II 
,..__ CE 484 Water Resources Engineering II 

rnermodynamics, engineering science and mechanics, electrical engineering or materials engi- 



120 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE 202 Introduction to Civil 

Engineering* 2 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus III 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

ESM 200 Introduction to Mechanics 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

Physical Education 1 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

GY 120 Elements of Physical Geology* ... 2 

GY 110 Physical Geology Laboratory 1 

MAT 200 Mechanical Properties of 

Structural Materials 2 

ESM 301 Mechanics of Solids 3 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations .... 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

18 



May be taken in reverse semesters 



Fall Semester 

CE 301 Engineering Surveying 3 

CE 325 Structural Analysis 3 

CE 332 Materials of Construction 3 

CE 382 Hydraulics 4 

IE 311 Engineering Economic Analysis ... 3 



16 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



Credits 



CE 305 Transportation Engineering I 

or 

CE 383 Water Resource Engineering I .... 4 

CE 326 Structural Engineering I 4 

CE 342 Soils Engineering I 4 

CE 365 Construction Engineer I 4 



Fall Semester 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 



1(5 



Credits 



CE 463 Cost Analysis and Control 3 

CE 466 Construction Engineering II 3 

Engineering Science Elective** 3 

Free Elective 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 



15 



CE 460 Construction Engineering 

Project 3 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting 3 

Free Elective 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 6 



15 



Hours Required for Graduation 129 



POST -BACCALAUREATE STUDY IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 
RELATED TO OTHER FIELDS 

Transportation Engineering or City and Regional Planning — There is a need for 
the coordination of transportation facilities and land planning. To fulfill this need, 
an advanced program leading to a post-baccalaureate degree in engineering with a 
major in transportation engineering, and to the degree of Master of Regional Plan- 
ning is offered through the combined resources of the Department of Civil Engi- 
neering at North Carolina State University and the Department of City and 
Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

The minimum residence requirements include two academic years plus a summer 
internship. A bachelor's degree in engineering, including a knowledge of transporta- 
tion engineering from an institution of recognized standing is required for admis- 
sion to the program. Applicants who do not meet these requirements in full may 
submit their credentials for examination and consideration. 

Further information may be obtained from the co-sponsoring departments. 

Water Resources — To meet industry's need for personnel with training in water 
supply and the abatement of water pollution, students in the many curricula leading 
to positions in industry (food processing, textile chemistry, pulp and paper tech- 
nology, chemical engineering, zoology and others) may consider courses in sanitary 
engineering for advanced undergraduate electives and for minor sequences for 
advanced degrees. Among appropriate courses are: CE 484, Water Resources 
Engineering II; CE 571, Theory of Water and Waste Treatment; CE 573, Unit 



* Humanities and Social Science courses to be selected from standard school pattern. 
** Thermodynamics, Engineering Science and Mechanics, Electrical Engineering or Materials Engi- 
neering. 



121 



Operations and Processes in Waste Treatment; CE 673, Industrial Water Supply 
and Waste Disposal; CE 674, Stream Sanitation. 

In addition to programs in water supply and pollution control, students may 
major in hydraulics and hydrology. These programs are developed in conjunction 
with engineering science and mechanics and agricultural engineering. For further 
information write the Department of Civil Engineering. 

Electrical Engineering 

Daniels Hall 

Professor L. K. Monteith, Head of the Department 

Professor W. D. Stevenson Jr., Associate Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor J. F. Kauffman, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: W. J. Barclay. W. Chou. A. R. Eckels, W. A. Flood, J. R. Hauser, N. F. J. Matthews, 
J. B. O'Neal Jr., D. R. Rhodes, J. Staudhammer, F. J. Tischer; Adjunct Professor: J. J. Wortman; 
Professor Emeritus: G. B. Hoadley; Associate Professors: N. R. Bell, W. T. Easter, J. W. Gault, 
T. H. Glisson. A. J. Goetze, M. A. Littlejohn, E. G. Manning, G. G. L. Meyer, W. C. Peterson, 
R. W. Stroh; Adjunct Associate Professors: E. Christian, M. G. Zaalouk; Associate Professors 
Emeriti: K. B. Glenn, W. P. Seagraves, E. W. Winkler; Assistant Professors: L. R. Herman, W. E. 
Snyder, G. G. Reeves; Adjunct Assistant Professors: J. W. Harrison, A. Jai. A. T. Shankle, J. R. 
Suttle, H. R. Whitman; Adjunct Instructors: G. F. Bland, J. L. White 

Electrical engineering includes such specialized fields as communication, com- 
puter, electric power, electronic and microwave engineering. The student is pre- 
pared for any of these professional activities by starting with a thorough grounding 
in engineering science followed by fundamental electrical theory and advanced 
subject matter. The advanced subject matter is offered through elective courses 
which emphasize antennas, radio wave propagation, automatic control, micro com- 
puters, digital systems, communications, telemetering, electronics, the design of 
electrical and electronic systems, electrical power production, the utilization of 
electric power, electronics in medicine, instrumentation, semiconductor devices, 
integrated circuits, and other vital and rapidly developing concerns. By appropriate 
choice of elective courses a student may follow a suggested program in one of the 
specialized fields of electrical engineering or may choose electives to achieve an 
individualized program of study. 

CURRICULUM 

The curriculum in electrical engineering includes comprehensive training in 
mathematics and physics — fundamental sciences — and adequate training in allied 
branches of engineering. The electrical engineering courses specified in the cur- 
riculum during the sophomore and junior years provide the fundamental electrical 
theory for all EE majors. Specialization is achieved primarily during the senior 
year through appropriate choices of elective courses. Most courses are accompanied 
by coordinated work in the laboratory and by application of theory in the solutions 
to carefully planned problems. Laboratories are for the study of servomechanisms 
and control, electronic circuits, instrumentation, computers, communications, micro- 
waves, antennas, electromagnetic fields and waves, electric filters and electrical 
machinery. Also there are a number of research laboratories, especially in solid- 
state electronics, computers, electromagnetics and communication systems. 

Each student, with a faculty adviser's assistance, is required to plan a coordi- 
nated program which will meet the requirements for a Bachelor of Science in elec- 
trical engineering. Qualified students may coordinate their senior year with a plan 
for graduate study (see degrees, pages 12-13). 

In addition to School of Engineering graduation requirements, attendance at two 
professional electrical engineering society meetings, one in the junior year and 
one in the senior year, is required. 

Also a minimum of six continuous weeks of gainful employment is required. 
A wide variety of employment may be used, but technical work while in military 
service or for a school does not satisfy this requirement. Evidence of employment 

122 



will consist of a letter from the employer setting forth inclusive dates of employ- 
ment, character of work performed and an evaluation of the student's work. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EE. 201 Electric Circuits I 4 EE 202 Electrical Circuits II 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 4 ESM 200 Intro, to Mechanics 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 MA 301 Applied Diff. Equations I 3 

Humanities and Social Science 3 Humanities and Social Science 3 

Physical Education 1 Free Elective 3 

— Physical Education 1 



16 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EE 302 Numerical Appl. in EE 3 EE 301 Linear Systems 3 

EE 314 Electronic Circuits 4 EE 305 Electric Power Systems 4 

EE 303 Electromagnetic Fields 4 EE 340 Fundamentals of Digital Systems . . 4 

ENG 321 Comm. of Tech. Infor 3 Approved Technical Elective*** 3 

Free Elective 3 Humanities and Social Science 3 

17 17 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EE 4-- Approved Dept. Elective** 3 EE 4-- Approved Dept. Elective** 3 

EE 4-- Approved Dept. Elective** 3 EE 4-- Approved Dept. Elective** 3 

Approved Technical Elective*** 3 MAE 301 Thermodynamics 3 

Humanities and Social Science 3 Humanities and Social Science 3 

Approved Engr. Sci. Elective* 3 Free Elective 3 

15 15 

Hours Required for Graduation 129 

Engineering Operations 

Riddick Hall 

Associate Professor- W. T. Easter, Director and Coordinator of Advising 

Engineers not only design equipment and structures; they operate and control 
production systems, perform management and supervision at all levels, plan and 
maintain plant facilities, and market technical products. These latter functions may 
be grouped together under the general term "operations" — the ongoing tasks of 
providing needed goods and services in an economical, safe and healthful manner. 
Engineering careers in operations are well suited to persons who have interest in 
both technical and business matters and who find satisfaction in accomplishing 
objectives through working with people. This program provides educational back- 
ground for such careers. 

CURRICULUM 

Engineering operations is an interdepartmental program of study leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree. Starting with a foundation of basic arts and sciences, 
the curriculum builds a thorough grounding in engineering fundamentals and appli- 



Chosen from an approved list of Engineering School electives (non EE courses). 

Chosen from an approved list of 400 level EE courses. Students with B or better average in EE 

and Math may use 500 level courses. 

Chosen from an approved list of Math, Physics, Statistics and Computer Science courses. 



123 



cations along with a strong introduction to the concepts and practices of business 
management. Additional depth in an area of the student's choice is provided by a 
technical elective sequence taken in the junior and senior years. Students may 
choose from three standard sequences — production control, industrial ceramics and 

electrical or may design a special sequence related to individual interests. 

The breadth and flexibility of this curriculum make it adaptable to a variety of 
individual educational needs ranging from general to specific interests. For exam- 
ple, several students currently are combining courses in music and instrument 
technology with the basic production sequence to prepare for careers in musical 
instrument manufacturing. 

JOINT PROGRAMS 

The School of Engineering operates joint programs in engineering operations 
(production sequence) with the Universities of North Carolina at Asheville and at 
Wilmington. A student at either school can complete up to 90 of the 128 credits 
before transferring to North Carolina State University. The remaining 38 credits 
can often be completed in one calendar year. Additional details are given in the 
UNC-A and UNC-W catalogs. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Engineering operations graduates find careers not only in manufacturing com- 
panies, but also in the military services, governmental agencies and in service 
firms such as utilities, contractors, consultants, financial institutions and trans- 
portation companies. 

Those who wish further education typically go into master's programs in manage- 
ment or business administration; some, however, enter related graduate engineer- 
ing programs or other professional schools such as law and medicine. 

ENGINEERING OPERATIONS CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



MA 202 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus III 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

ESM 211 Introduction to Applied 

Mechanics 3 

E 207 Engineering Graphics III 2 

Humanities and Social Sciences* 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

MAT 201 Structure and Properties of 

Engineering Materials 3 

ACC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of 

Financial Reporting 3 

ESM 212 Mechanics of Engineering 

Materials 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences* 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Fall Semester 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



MAE 307 Energy and Energy 

Transformations 3 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics 

for Engineers 3 

ACC 262 Managerial Uses of Cost Data ... 3 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

Technical Sequence** 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences* 3 



Credits 



EE 350 Electric Power Utilization in 

Manufacturing Processes 3 

IE 301 Engineering Economy 3 

IE 328 Manufacturing Processes 3 

Technical Sequence** 3 

Free Elective 3 



15 



17 



124 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EB 202 Economics II 



Credits 



EB 326 Personnel Management 3 

EO 491 Seminar in Engineering 

Operations 1 

Technical Sequence** 6 

Humanities and Social Sciences* 3 

Free Elective 3 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

IE 420 Manufacturing Controls 3 

Technical Sequence** 6 

Humanities and Social Sciences* 3 

Free Elective 3 



15 



Hours Required for Graduation 128 

(125 with the electrical sequence) 



TECHNICAL ELECTIVE SEQUENCES 

JUNIOR F S 

1. Production: (total 19 credits) 

EB 332 Industrial Relations 3 

IE 443 Quality Control 3 

3 3 

2 Industrial Ceramics: (total 19 credits) 

MAT 311 Ceramic Processing I 4 

MAT 312 Ceramic Processing II 3 

4 3 

3. Electrical: (total 19 credits) 

EE 350 Electric Power Utilization 

in Manufacturing Processes (3) will 

not be taken. 

EE 201, 202 Electric Circuits I, II . . .4 4 

4 4 

4. Individualized: (total 18 credits) 

Tailored to the specific needs of individual 
students. See the program director for fur- 
ther information. 



SENIOR 



F S 



IE 332 Motion & Time Study 4 

IE 343 Plant Layout and Materials 

Handling 3 

Technical Electives 3 3 

7 6 

MAT 417 Ceramic Subsystem Design ... 3 

Technical Electives 6 3 

6 6 

EE 314 Electronic Circuits 4 

EE 340 Fundamentals of Digital Systems 4 

EE Elective 3 

4 7 



Industrial Engineering 

Riddick Engineering Laboratories 

Professor W. A. Smith Jr., Head of the Department 

Professor S. E. Elmaghraby, Associate Head of the Department 

Associate Professor H. L. W. Nuttle, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: J. R. Canada, S. E. Elmaghraby, R. W. Llewellyn, R. G. Pearson, A. L. Prak; Associate 
Professors: R. E. Alvarez, M. A. Ayoub, R. H. Bernhard, J. J. Harder, Shaler Stidham Jr.; 
Assistant Professors: E. L. Blair, J. A. Tompkins; Instructor: T. W. Myers; Visiting Lecturers: 
J. A. Ekwall, S. G. Isley; Adjunct Professor: A. L. Swan; Adjunct Assistant Professors: M. J. 
Goodman, D. J. Kulonda; Professors Emeriti: C. A. Anderson, R. G. Carson Jr. 

The industrial engineer designs, improves and installs integrated systems of 
people, materials, equipment, and information. One draws upon specialized knowl- 
edge and skill in the mathematical, physical and social sciences, together with the 
principles and methods of engineering analysis and design to specify, predict and 
evaluate the results to be obtained from these systems. Productivity and effective 



* Courses in the humanities and social sciences are to follow the standard plan for the School of 

Engineering. See pages 113-115. 
'* Students may follow a standard or an approved individualized technical elective sequence as 
outlined below. 



125 



utilization of resources, including energy conservation, are principle concerns of 
practitioners. The industrial engineer may develop operations, improvements for 
many diverse activities, such as a hostpial, a department store, a manufacturing 
enterprise, an insurance office or government functions. His or her position in an 
organization is usually as a management adviser in contact with every phase of the 
organization. 

The curriculum blends a basic group of common engineering technical courses 
with specialized courses in the major areas of industrial engineering — design of 
human and machine systems, design of management control systems, and improve- 
ment of manufacturing operations. The course offerings stress mathematical and 
statistical techniques of industrial systems analysis; quantitative methodologies of 
operations research; computers as a tool for problem solving and simulation; 
economic considerations of alternatives; control of product or service quality and 
quantity; specifications of the manufacturing process including the equipment and 
tooling; and the utilization of safety and human factors engineering principles. 

Industrial engineering's undergraduate program leads to a Bachelor of Science 
degree in industrial engineering. For graduate degrees, see pages 12-13. The 
department also offers a Bachelor of Science in furniture manufacturing and 
management which is described on pages 126-127. 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

IE 200 Introduction to IE 2 MAT 201 Struc. Prop. Engr. Mtl. I 3 

MA 202 Anatlyic Geom. & Calc. Ill 4 IE 311 Engineering Econ. Analy 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 MA 301 Appl. Diff. Equations I 3 

ST 371 Intro, to Prob. & Distr. Theory 2 ST 372 Intro, to Stat. Inf. & Regr 2 

Humanities & Social Science 3 Humanities & Social Science 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 15 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ACC 262 Mangr'l. Uses of Cost Data 3 IE 308 Con. of Prod. & Serv. Sys 4 

ESM 205 Principles of Eng. Mech 3 IE 352 Work Analysis & Design 3 

IE 321 Bus. Data Processing 3 IE 401 Stoch. Models in IE 3 

IE 351 Manufacturing Eng 3 Humanities & Social Science 3 

IE 361 Det. Models in IE 3 Free Elective 3 

15 16 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EE 331 Principles of Elec. Eng 3 Technical Elective 6 

IE 452 Ergonomics 3 Engineering Science Elective 3 

Technical Elective 3 Humanities & Social Science 3 

Engineering Science Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

Humanities & Social Science 3 — 

Free Elective 3 15 

18 Hours Required for Graduation 127 

Furniture Manufacturing and Management 

James T. Ryan Professor Anco L. Park, In Charge 

limtructor: T. W. Myers; Furniture Extension Specialist: E. L. Clark; Visiting Lecturer: J. A. Ekwall 

The furniture industry ranks second only to the automobile as a producer of 
consumer durable goods. The industry is the second largest industrial employer in 



To be effective 1 July 1975 for Class of 1978. 

126 



North Carolina and produces over 25 per cent of the furniture made in the U.S.A. 
The industry is changing rapidly with the introduction of mechanization, new 
materials and sophisticated management controls. 

The furniture manufacturing and management program is the only one of its 
kind in the country. It receives industry support and guidance. Plant and market 
field trips combined with project type instruction give students in-depth under- 
standing of manufacturing. The faculty keeps abreast of industry problems through 
close contact with the Southern Furniture Manufacturers Association and by doing 
applied research and extension work. 

The cooperative education program is well suited to the furniture manufacturing 
and management curriculum. 



CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in furniture manufacturing and management 
prepares graduates for technical and managerial positions in the industry. 

The curriculum stresses the application of engineering and technology to furni- 
ture manufacturing. Related subjects such as management, accounting and economic 
analysis cover the business side of modern furniture production systems. 

In addition to academic course work, a minimum of six weeks of continuous, 
gainful employment in a furniture manufacturing plant is required. Usually, such 
employment is between the junior and senior years. 

FURNITURE MANUFACTURING AND MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

E 240 Furniture Graphics 3 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

IE 200 Intro, to Ind. Engineering 2 

Humanities & Soc. Science 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

ACC 262 Managerial Uses Cost Data 3 

IE 241 Furn. Mfg. Processes I 3 

ST 361 Intro, to Stat, for Engrs. I 3 

WPS 201 Elements of Wood 3 

Humanities & Soc. Science 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



WPS 205 Summer Practicum 5 



Fall Semester 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



Credits 



IE 321 Business Data Processing 3 

IE 332 Motion & Time Study 4 

IE 340 Furn. Mfg. Processes II 4 

IE 345 Principles of Upholstery 2 

Humanities & Soc. Science 3 



16 



IE 301 Engineering Economy 3 

IE 341 Furn. Plant Layout & Design 3 

IE 371 Furn. Quality & Prod. Control 4 

Free Elective 3 

Aprpoved Elective 2 



Fall Semester 

IE 470 Furn. Mfg. Organization 2 

Humanities & Soc. Science 3 

Free Elective 3 

Approved Elective 4 



12 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 

EB 326 Personnel Management or 



15 



Credits 



EB 332 Industrial Relations 3 

IE 440 Furn. Management Analysis 3 

Free Elective 3 

Approved Elective 2 

Humanities & Soc. Science 3 



To be effective 1 July 1976 for class of 1978. 



14 



Hours Required for Graduation 126 



127 



Materials Engineering 

Page Hall 

Professor W. W. Austin Jr., Head of the Department and Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: J. R. Beeler Jr.. R. B. Benson Jr., A. A. Fahmy, J. K. Magor, C. R. Manning Jr.. K. L. 
Moazed. H. Palmour III. H. H. Stadelmaier. R F. Stoops; Adjunct Professors: H. M. Davis. 
G. Mayer; Associate Professors: J. V. Hamme, G. O. Harrell; Assistant Professors: R. F. Davis. 
M. L. Fiedler. L. T. Jordan; Adjunct Assistant Professor: J. C. Hurt; Special Lecturer: K. R. 
Brose 

The Department of Materials Engineering offers education, research and pro- 
fessional development which qualifies graduates as technical and administrative 
leaders for industries and government agencies involved with design, development, 
selection and processing of engineering materials. Typical industries served by 
materials engineers are: aerospace, electrical and electronics, construction, nuclear 
power and transportation. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Materials engineers job opportunities include those in research and development 
of new materials needed in the rapidly expanding fields of chemical, mechanical, 
aerospace, electronic and nuclear technology. With the continued industrial develop- 
ment of the South and the State of North Carolina, opportunities are developing for 
materials engineers to play a vital role in maintaining state and regional progress. 

Professional training in materials engineering provides opportunities for employ- 
ment in industries producing or consuming essential products including metals and 
alloys, glass in all its forms, enamels and protective coatings for metals, structural 
clay products such as brick and tile, thermal insulators, electrical insulators, 
electronic devices, plastics, and composite materials. 

CURRICULUM 

The undergraduate curriculum is comprised of a three-year program of funda- 
mental courses followed by a fourth year in which the student chooses a specialty 
area: ceramic engineering, metallurgical engineering, polymeric materials, ma- 
terials processing, or materials engineering (general). A fifth year professional 
program is available for advanced work and further specialization in these fields. 

Graduate degrees are available (see pages 12-13 and consult the Graduate 
Catalog). 

Well-equipped laboratories aid research and instruction in: Auger spectroscopy, 
x-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, elec- 
tron microprobe analysis, radiography, metallography, electron microscopy, me- 
chanical behavior of materials, and nuclear fuel research. 

PROFESSIONAL STUDY 

In addition to the regular graduate program a fifth or professional year of post- 
graduate study is offered in materials engineering. This program of advanced 
course work leads to the degree of Materials Engineer. It is especially designed for 
students planning careers in consulting, production activities or in technical service 
and sales. Each program of study is individually designed. Regulations covering 
professional study are shown on pages 133-134. 



MATERIALS ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Cal. Ill 4 MA 301 Differential Equations 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 Humanities & Social Sc 3 

128 



Humanities & Social Sc 3 ESM 205 Prin. of Engrg. Mechanics 3 

CSC 111 Introd. to Computer Science 2 EE 331, 339 Electrical Engineering 4 

Physical Education 1 MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics 3 

Elective 3 Physical Education 1 

17 17 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MAT 301 Equil. & Rate Processes MAT 302 Materials Processing 3 

in Materials Eng 3 MAT 310 Physical Exam, of Matls 2 

MAT 320 Phys. Prin. In Matls. Sc. I 3 MAT 321 Phys. Prin. in Matls. Sc. II 3 

Humanities & Social Sc 3 MAT 322 Phase Diagrams 2 

ESM 307 Solid Mechanics 3 Humanities & Social Sc 3 

Technical Electives 3 Technical Elective 3 

15 16 

SENIOR YEAR 

MAT 431 Physical Metallurgy I 3 MAT 423 Matls. Factors in Design I 3 

MAT 435 Physical Ceramics I 3 Humanities & Social Science 3 

MAT 450 Mechanical Properties of Matls. . 3 Technical Elective 3 

CHE 325 Introduction to Plastics 3 Electives 6 

Technical Electives 3 — 

— 15 

15 

Hours Required for Graduation 127 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

Broughton Hall 

Professor C. F. Zorowski, Head of Department 

Professor J. C. Williams III, Associate Head of Department 

Professor B. H. Garcia Jr., Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: J. A. Bailey, R. F. Barrett, M. H. Clayton, F. R. DeJarnette, J. A. Edwards, W. C. 
Griffith, F. J. Hale, F. D. Hart. H. A. Hassan, E. G. Humphries, R. B. Knight, M. N. Ozisik, J. N. 
Perkins. F. O. Smetana, F. Y. Sorrell, J. K. Whitfield, J. Woodburn; Adjunct Professors: J. J. 
Murray, E. A. Saibel; Professors Emeriti: H. B. Briggs, J. S. Doolittle, R. M. Pinkerton; Associate 
Professors: E. M. Afify, J. R. Bailey, T. H. Hodgson, C. J. Maday, C. J. Moore Jr.. J. C. Mulligan. 
L. H. Royster; Associate Professor and Extension Specialist: H. M. Eckerlin; Adjunct Associate 
Professors: E. S. Armstrong Jr., R. E. Singleton; Associate Professor Emeritus: W. E. Adams; 
Assistant Professors: J. A. Daggerhart Jr., T. H. Pierce, W. F. Reiter Jr.; Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: G. Y. Anderson, F. O. Carta, D. P. Colvin, J. S. Stewart, J. R. Yow; Assistant Professor 
Emeritus: T. J. Martin Jr.; Instructor: G. O. Batton; Visiting Instructor: R. A. Howland; Exten- 
sion Specialist: A. S. Boyers. 

Mechanical engineers specialize in the generation of power and the design of 
machines and processes that apply mechanical and thermal energy to useful pur- 
poses. Example areas of specialization include conventional (fossil fuel) power gener- 
ation; novel power sources (solar, wind, tides, etc.); internal combustion, diesel and 
turbine engines; heating, air conditioning and refrigeration; air, sea, and land 
vehicles; all types of mechanical devices, systems, and machinery; domestic and 
commercial appliances; instrumentation and industrial controls; and air, noise, and 
thermal pollution abatement systems. 

Aerospace engineering shares responsibility for many of the areas listed above 
but is principally concerned with the design and the analysis of the performance, 
stability, and control of modern aircraft, both commercial and private, and space 
vehicles; all types of mechanical devices, systems, and machinery; domestic and 
and electric propulsion systems; and aerodynamics — the interaction between the 
vehicle and the atmosphere. 

CURRICULA 

Because of the close relationship between mechanical and aerospace engineering, 
both curricula are administered by one department. There is cooperation between 

129 



the two disciplines in which responsibility for subject areas such as thermo- 
dynamics, heat and mass transfer, vibrations, acoustics, fluid mechanics, propul- 
sion and control theory is shared. 

Each program is designed to provide the student with an understanding of both 
the science on which the discipline is founded and the applied science and tech- 
nology which characterizes its specific personality. In addition the programs pro- 
vide the student with an opportunity to begin developing the skills of applying his 
or her acquired knowledge and specializing in a specific area of discipline interest. 
The Bachelor of Science degree is available in both aerospace engineering and 
mechanical engineering. Graduate degrees are also offered (see pages 12-13 and 
consult the Graduate Catalog). 

FACILITIES 

The academic programs in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering are augmented 
by extensive laboratory facilities available for practical experience in engineering 
systems. Mechanical Engineering facilities include instrumentation, acoustic and 
vibration, photoelasticity, stress analysis, dynamomentry, heat transfer, materials 
processing and design laboratories. Aerospace engineering facilities include sub- 
sonic, transonic, and supersonic wind tunnels, aerospace structures and propulsion 
laboratories. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Since all industry uses machinery and power, and mechanization is expanding 
the world over, mechanical engineering provides career and employment opportuni- 
ties which are virtually limitless. Mechanical engineers are needed in every 
technology-oriented industry as well as in such fields as law and medicine. 

The aerospace industry is one of the largest employers of engineers in the United 
States. Career and employment opportunities are available in the areas of aero- 
dynamics, propulsion, structures and stability and control in both commercial and 
private aviation and in related aerospace industries. 

Mechanical engineers and aerospace engineers find opportunities in design, pro- 
duction, testing, operation and maintenance, research and development, marketing 
and sales, management and teaching. Opportunities are limited only by the capa- 
bilities and professional training of the individual. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and MAE 216 Elements of Mechanical 

Calculus III 4 Engineering 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 MA 301 Applied Differential Equa- 

ESM 205 Principles of Engineering tions I 3 

Mechanics 3 ESM 305 Engineering Dynamics 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences* CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

Humanities. Social Sciences* 
or 

Free Elective 

Physical Education 1 



Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 Free Elective 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fail SrmiHti r Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermo- MAE 302 Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 3 dynamics II 3 

MAE 305 Mechanical Engineering MAE 306 Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory I 1 Laboratory II 1 

MAE 316 Strength of Mechanical MAE 315 Dynamics of Machines 3 

Components 3 EE 332 Principles of Electrical 

EE 33 1 Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

Engineering 3 ESM 303 Fluid Mechanics I 3 



130 



MAT 201 Structure and Properties of 

Engineering Materials 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences* 

or 
Free Elective 3 

16 

SENIOR 
Fall Semester Credits 

MAE 401 Energy Conversion 

or 

MAE 402 Heat & Mass Transfer 3 

MAE 405 Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory III 1 

MAE 415 Mechanical Engineering 

Analysis 3 

Departmental Elective 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences* 

or 
Free Elective 6 

16 



Humanities, Social Sciences* 

or 
Free Elective 3 

16 



YEAR 

Spring Semester 

MAE 402 Heat & Mass Transfer 



Credits 



MAE 401 Energy Conversion 3 

MAE 416 Mechanical Engineering 

Design 4 

Departmental Elective 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences* 

or 
Free Elective 6 

16 

Hours Required for Graduation 126 



Students may elect to take PY 201, 202 and 203 in place of PY 205. 208. Rearrangement of the 
schedule of courses to accomplish this will be worked out in consultation with the student's adviser. 



See pages 113-115 for information concerning the humanities, social science sequence. 



AEROSPACE ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 



Fall Semester 

MA 202 Analytic Geom. & Cal. Ill 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

ESM 205 Prin. of Engr. Mech 3 

Humanities, Social Sci. 
or 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MAB 261 Aero. Vehicle Performance .... 3 

MA 301 Applied Differen. Equations 3 

ESM 305 Engineering Dymanics 3 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

MAT 201 Struc. & Prop, of Eng-r. Mat. I . 3 
Physical Education 1 



15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 3 

MAE 355 Aerodynamics I 4 

MAE 371 Aero. Vehicle Struct. I 3 

EE 331 Prin. of Elec. Engr 3 

EE 339 Prin. of Elec. Engr. Lab 1 

Humanities, Social Sciences 

or 

Free Elective 3« 



17 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



MAE 356 Aerodynamics II 4 

MAE 365 Propulsion I 3 

MAE 435 Principles of Auto Control 3 

MAE 472 Aero. Vehicle Struct. II 4 

Humanities, Social Sciences 

or 

Free Elective 3 " 



17 



Fall Semester 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



MAE 478 Aero. Vehicle Design I 2 

MAE 462 Flight Veh. Stab. & Con 3 

MAE 465 Propulsion II 4 

MAE 455 Boundary Layer Theory 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences 

or 

Free Electives 6 * 



Credits 



MAE 479 Aero. Vehicle Design II 3 

Departmental Elective 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences 

or 
Free Electives 9 " 



is 



Hours Required for Graduation 129 



* 27 credit hours of Humanities, Social Sciences and free electives of which 9 credit hours are free 
electives and 18 credit hours are Humanities and Social Sciences which must be taken from an 
approved list. 



131 



Nuclear Engineering 

Burlington Engineering Laboratories 
ProfessorT. S. Elleman, Head of the Department 
Associate Professor E. Stam, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: R. P. Gardner, R. L. Murray. R. F. Saxe, K. Verghese, L. R. Zumwalt: Associate Pro- 
fessors: J. R. Bohannon Jr., C. E. Siewert; Extension Specialist: J. Kohl; Health Physicist: R. D. 
Cross; Reactor Engineer: F. J. Steinkruger 

Nuclear engineering is concerned with the engineering aspects of the control, 
release and utilization of nuclear energy. Nuclear reactors serve many functions — 
they serve as heat sources for economical electric power plants, are the basis of 
modern propulsion systems for ships and submarines, and produce fissionable and 
radioactive isotopes for a variety of peaceful applications. Nuclear methods are 
applied in medical diagnosis and treatment, scientific research, and the search for 
new resources. The nuclear engineering program educates individuals in scientific 
and engineering principles essential for effective and productive contributions in 
industrial, university and government service. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Although the nuclear industry is relatively young, it already represents a major 
national effort. Reactor development and construction will continue to grow as we 
become increasingly reliant upon nuclear energy as a substitute for energy from 
fossil fuels. Industrial applications of radiation will accelerate as the economic 
potential of such methods becomes even more firmly established. There continues to 
be a substantial need for nuclear engineers, especially by electric utilities, reactor 
manufacturers, and regulatory agencies. 

CURRICULUM 

Nuclear engineers work in nuclear systems research, design, development, test- 
ing, operation, environmental protection, and marketing. The Bachelor of Science 
program prepares graduates for positions in industry or government laboratories or 
for graduate study (see pages 12-13). The curriculum incorporates basic sciences 
and engineering, with emphasis on mathematics and physics, followed by course- 
work in nuclear science and technology. Attention is given to the engineering 
design of nuclear reactors and nuclear radiation systems and to energy resources 
and environmental aspects of nuclear energy. 

Facilities for nuclear education include: a one-megawatt pulsing reactor (PUL- 
STAR), which can be operated at a steady state of 1 MW or pulsed to 2200 MW; a 
cobalt-60 gamma source, 20,000 curies; solid state detectors and multi-channel 
analyzers for gamma-ray analysis; analog computers; digital computer, IBM 
System/360, Model 75; activation analysis laboratory; and high- and low-level 
radiochemistry laboratories. 

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 116. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and Cal. Ill ... 4 MA 301 Appl. Diff. Equations I 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 PY 410 Introductory Nuclear Physics 4 

MAT 201 Struc. and Prop. Eng. Mtls 3 ESM 200 Introduction to Mechanics 3 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 NE 201 Appl. of Nuclear Energy 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 3 Humanities and Social Sciences 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 
MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 3 MA 401 Appl. Dif. Equations II 3 

132 



EE 331 Principles of Electrical Engr 3 EE 332 Principles of Electrical Engr 3 

ESM 303 Fluid Mechanics I 3 MAE 303 Engr. Thermodynamics III 3 

NE 302 Fundamentals of Nucl. Engr 4 NE 401 Reactor Analysis and Design 4 

Humanities and Social Sciences 3 Free Elective 3 

16 16 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

NE 402 Reactor Engineering 4 NE 403 Nucl. Engr. Design Proj 3 

NE 404 Rad. and Reactor Safety 3 NE 405 Reactor Systems and Economics . . 3 

Technical Elective 3 NE Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 3 Humanities and Social Sciences 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

16 15 

Hours Required for Graduation 129 

Professional Program in Engineering 

The School of Engineering offers professional curricula leading to the degrees 
Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Industrial Engineer, 
Materials Engineer, Mechanical Engineer and Nuclear Engineer. A program of 
study is designed to fit the particular needs of each student. 

Professional course work is emphasized rather than research. The curriculum 
consists of a minimum of 30 credits making up a planned program designed to fit 
the student's objective. 

ADMISSION 

Applicants who hold the bachelor's degree in engineering will be admitted to the 
professional program of the School of Engineering upon presentation of official 
credentials. For unconditional admission, these credentials must show the com- 
pletion, with a minimum grade-point average of 2.5 (C + ), of an amount of under- 
graduate work in the proposed field of professional study corresponding to that 
normally required for a bachelor's degree in that field. 

Admission on a provisional basis may be granted applicants who do not meet 
the formal requirements. In case of insufficient preparation, prerequisite courses 
will be prescribed in addition to the normal program requirements. 

Application should be filed in the office of the dean of the School of Engineering 
at least 30 days in advance of the semester in which admission is sought. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

The following regulations of the School of Engineering will be observed: 

1) An undergraduate enrolled at North Carolina State University who plans to 
undertake a professional program and who has fulfilled all requirements for the 
bachelor's degree except for a few courses, may be permitted to enroll in courses for 
credit toward the professional degree provided the student has given notice of his 
purpose to the dean of the School of Engineering. 

2) A limited amount of credit to be applied toward the requirements for the pro- 
fessional degree may be transferred to N. C. State from other institutions offering 
advanced work in engineering. Transfer of credit must be recommended by the head 
of the department in which the student does his major work and approved by the 
Dean of Engineering. 

3) Professional students are classified as post-baccalaureate students and are 
subject to rules and regulations established by the Dean of Engineering. 

4) Grades for completed courses are reported to the Dean of Engineering and to 
Registration and Records. A minimum grade of "C" must be made in each course 
to obtain credit. A quality point average of 2.5 (C + ) in all course work must be 
attained to satisfy requirements for a professional degree. 

5) Work completed more than six years prior to the date on which the profes- 
sional degree is to be granted may not be used as credit toward the professional 
degree, unless approved by the head of the department concerned and the Dean of 
Engineering. 

133 



6) Each professional student will be assigned an adviser in his or her major area. 
The adviser assists the student in preparing a program of study and counsels him 
or her in academic work. The student is required to prepare with the adviser's assis- 
tance, a complete plan of study before the end of the first semester in residence. 
This program of study is subject to approval by the Dean of Engineering. 

Forestry students gain valuable experience through a lecture in the natural setting 
of Schenck Forest. 




134 



FOREST RESOURCES 

Biltmore Hall 

E. L. Ellwood, Dean 

L. C. Saylor, Associate Dean and Coordinator of Advising 

The management and utilization of the South's forest resources and products 
provide opportunities for challenging professional careers. Forests provide a variety 
of goods — timber, water, wildlife and recreation environments — vital to the economy 
and well being of North Carolina. Graduates of the School are qualified for pro- 
fessional positions managing forest lands, or producing the products or managing 
the services developed from these lands. Emphasis is placed on natural renewable 
resource management because the wise use of the products and amenities that can 
be derived from forest lands is central to preserving environmental quality and the 
quality of life. 

North Carolina is an important forest state. Its 20 million acres of commercial 
forest land, comprising two-thirds of the State's land area, form the base for goods 
and services valued at approximately five billion dollars annually. Nearly 20 per- 
cent of the state's industrial labor force is associated with forest based organiza- 
tions; forests support the southern region's largest industry. New wood-using 
industries continue to move into the South, creating multi-billion dollar outputs. 
Similarly, recreational activities continue to expand as a result of growing popula- 
tion, affluence, mobility and leisure time. 

As a result of this growth, forest based industries and governmental agencies 
need well-educated, technically competent personnel. 

Some of the programs in the School of Forest Resources are not duplicated in 
other Southern Universities, so the Trustees of the University and the Southern 
Regional Education Board have designated them as regional in nature. As a result 
no limit is set for enrollments of qualified out-of-state students. 

DEGREES 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred upon the satisfactory completion of 
any of the four- year undergraduate curricula listed below. 

Graduate degrees offered include: Master of Science, Master of Forestry, Master 
of Recreation Resources, Master of Wood and Paper Science and the Doctor of 
Philosophy. Applicants should consult the Graduate Catalog for additional infor- 
mation. 

FIELD INSTRUCTION AND EXPERIENCE 

All students (except those in conservation) are required to present an equivalent 
of one summer of acceptable work experience. Students consult with their advisers 
as to what constitutes acceptable employment. 

A summer camp is required of all forestry students. This camp follows the sopho- 
more year for resident students. Transfer students attend the camp after completing 
the junior year at North Carolina State University. 

Undergraduates enrolled in recreation resources administration complete a nine- 
weeks internship immediately following the completion of the junior year. 

All pulp and paper majors spend at least one summer working in a pulp and 
paper mill designated by the University. 

Wood science and technology students attend a summer practicum following the 
sophomore year; transfer students attend following the junior year. 

Additional field instruction and scheduled trips to representative industries and 
agencies are required frequently as a part of regular class assignments. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Students making exceptional academic records during their freshman year may, 
with faculty approval, follow an honors program. Honors students develop more 

135 



rigorous programs of study, frequently taking advanced courses in mathematics, 
chemistry, statistics and economics. With the adviser's consent honors students may 
substitute preferred courses for normally required courses in order to develop 
strength in special interest areas. Honors students are required to undertake a 
program of independent study which can involve a research problem or special 
project during their junior or senior year. 

EXTENSION 

The Forestry Extension program, a part of the Agricultural Extension Service, 
is the largest program of its type in the United States. It serves landowners, 
industries and public agencies in the areas of forestry, recreation, wildlife and 
wood and paper. Its primary responsibility is promoting the application of new 
ideas developed through research and experience. 

In cooperation with the Continuing Education Division, short courses are offered 
in a number of fields to provide industry and government employees an oppor- 
tunity to keep abreast of modern developments in techniques and equipment. 

FACILITIES AND LABORATORIES 

A school library and most classrooms are housed in Biltmore Hall. Among special 
education facilities in Forest Resources are: 80,000 acres in forests including the 
Hofmann forest on the coastal plain; the Hill, Schenck, Hope Valley and Goodwin 
Forests in the Piedmont; and the Slocum summer camp for sophomores in Hill 
Forest, Durham county. Specialized laboratories unique to the South are the Hodges 
Wood Products Laboratory housing machining, gluing, finishing, preserving, testing 
and research laboratories, a sawmill, a dry kiln and a veneer lathe; and the Robert- 
son Laboratory with wood preparation, chemistry, pulping, testing and coloring 
laboratories, digesters and a small paper machine. 

CURRICULA 

Five curricula are administered in the School through its Departments of Fores- 
try, Recreation Resources Administration and Wood and Paper Science. These 
programs provide a broad education in the biological and physical sciences as well 
as a sound cultural background. Students are prepared for careers in the profes- 
sional fields of conservation, forestry, recreation resources administration, pulp and 
p -per science and technology, and wood science and technology. 

Freshmen have a nearly common core of courses during the first semester allow- 
ing deferment of the final selection of a curriculum for two or three semesters. To 
assist students with a better understanding of their major area of study, intro- 
ductory courses are given in each curriculum. 

Conservation 

(Also see Agriculture and Life Sciences.) 
M. G. Cook, Major Adviser, School of Agriculture and Life Sciences 
L. C. Saylor, Major Adviser, School of Forest Resources 

Conservation is wise use, perpetuation, or improvement of natural resources for 
the long-term benefit of society. Rapid urbanization and industrialization, and 
increasing population, are increasing pressures on the use of land areas for food 
and fiber, for wood and water and for recreation. These trends require trained 
people to make sound judgments in natural resources management and use. 

The Schools of Forest Resources and Agriculture and Life Sciences — with strong 
programs in forestry, recreation, wood and paper science, ecology, soils, wildlife 
and the basic biological sciences — jointly offer a baccalaureate program in conser- 
vation. Conservation graduates are trained in the basic concepts of several dis- 
ciplines to apply a conservation philosophy to problem-solving in a modern society. 



136 



CURRICULUM 

Depending upon interests, students enroll in either Forest Resources or Agricul- 
ture and Life Sciences. All programs in conservation have common core courses; 
specialty areas or minors are developed through elective courses. 

Conservation provides a broad general education in natural resource manage- 
ment leading to a Bachelor of Science degree, rather than emphasizing technological 
aspects. Students desiring a more professional emphasis frequently combine the 
conservation program with a second degree. By the proper choice of electives, one 
may obtain a dual degree in fields such as botany, forestry, liberal arts, recreation, 
soil science, wildlife management and zoology. 

CONSERVATION CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 

or 

FOR 101 Introduction to Forestry 1 

BO 200 Plant Life 

or 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

MA 111 Algebra & Trigonometry 4 

Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus A 4 

Physical Education 1 



15 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 



Spring Semester 
BO 200 Plant Life 



Credits 



CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 

GY 120 Elements of Physical Geology 2 

GY 110 Physical Geology Laboratory 1 

Humanity-Social Science Electives 6 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural 

Resources 3 

Physical Education 1 



ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

English Elective 3 

tree Elective 4 

SSC 200 Soil Science* 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



17 



Fall Semester 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 4 

Conservation Elective 3 

RRA 241 Recreation Resource Rela- 
tionships 3 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Biological Science Elective 3 

Conservation Elective 3 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource 

Management 3 



16 



17 



Fall Semester 

Biological Science Elective 3 

Conservation Elective 3 

English Elective 3 

ZO 353 Wildlife Management 3 

Free Electives 4 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Biological Science Elective 3 

Conservation Elective 3 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

Free Electives 6 



16 



15 



Hours Required for Graduation 128 



* Students with non-technical interests may substitute SSC 205 for SSC 200. 

Elective courses may be used for emphasizing subject areas in communication, 
soils, wildlife biology, education and other areas. 



137 



Forestry 

Biltmore Hall 

Professor C. B. Davey, Head of Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: F. S. Barkalow Jr., R C. Bryant. A. W. Cooper, E. B. Cowling. M. H. Farrier. L. F. 
Grand. W. L. Hafley. J. W. Johnson. J. O. Lammi. D. E. Moreland (USDA), G. Namkoong (USFS), 
T. O. Perry. L. C. Saylor, R. R. Wilkinson, B. J. Zobel; Adjunct Professors: G. H. Hepting, J. W. 
Koenigs. E. G. Kuhlman, L. J. Metz. C. G. Wells, R. C. Winkworth; Professors Emeriti: T. E. 
Maki. W. D. Miller. R. J. Preston; Associate Professors: A. E. Hassan, D. L. Holley, R. C. Kellison, 
D. H. J. Steensen, A. L. Sullivan, A. G. Wollum II; Adjunct Associate Professors : W. T. Gladstone, 
H. T. Schreuder, R Stonecypher, H. A. Thomas; Assistant Professors: F. P. Hain, L. G. Jervis; 
Adjunct Assistant Professor: J. A. Barker; Liaison Geneticists: J. B. Jett Jr., E. C. Sossaman Jr., 
R J. Weir; Teaching Technician: T. V. Gemmer: Research Associates: J. M. Cheeseman, L. W. 
Haines; Research Assistants: D. W. Hazel, J. R. Sprague 

EXTENSION 

Professors: W. T. Huxter — Leader Forestry Section, J. C. Jones; Professors Emeriti: W. M. Keller, 
F. E. Whitfield; Associate Professors: R. S. Douglass, E. M. Jones; Assistant Professors: J. R 
McGraw. W. M. Stanton, A. J. Weber; Specialist: L. H. Harkins 

CURRICULUM 

The forestry curriculum provides students a basic educational background of 
biological, physical, and social sciences, humanities, mathematics and communica- 
tion skills. Interspersed throughout the curriculum are forestry courses that deal 
with a wide variety of professional activities. 

The goal of the program is a good education in the management and protection 
of rural and urban forest lands and resources, and the environment which they 
influence. Academic studies on campus are supplemented by practical laboratory 
exercises in forest areas, and the sophomore year is followed by an intensive 
10-week summer camp experience in the Coastal Plain, Piedmont and Mountain 
regions of North Carolina. 

Three months of acceptable work experience are required for graduation with a 
Bachelor of Science degree in forestry. 

FORESTRY FIELDS OF SPECIALIZATION 

The concentrations in forestry include a) general forestry, b) business operations, 
c) forestry biometry, d) watershed management, e) forest biology, f) wildlife man- 
agement, g) harvesting operations, h) recreation, i) conservation and j) wood tech- 
nology. A student selects a concentration and schedules appropriate approved 
courses. 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Programs have been arranged with economics and business, entomology, rec- 
reation resources administration, soil science, and zoology, whereby students can 
obtain, in addition to the Bachelor of Science degree in forestry, a second 
Bachelor of Science degree in agricultural economics, conservation, entomology, 
natural resource recreation management, soil science or wildlife management. 
These joint programs usually require additional credits above the forestry con- 
centration and free elective credits. Depending upon ability, students may carry 
additional credits in their four-year program or by enrolling for an extra semester 
or equivalent summer session. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates are in demand by state and federal land-managing agencies, by indus- 
trial concerns growing wood as a raw material, and by other organizations and 
agencies such as the agricultural extension service. Some graduates, after acquiring 
professional forestry experience, are self-employed as consultants and as operators 
or owners of forest-related businesses. 

138 






FORESTRY CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEARi 



Fall Semester Credits 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geom. Calc. A 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

FOR 101 Introduction to Forestry 1 

Physical Education 1 



IT 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 103 (107) General Chemistry 4 

MA 212 Analytic Geom. Calc. B 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

FOR 210 Dendrology (Gymnosperms) 2 

Humanity-Social Science Elec 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



PY 221 College Physics 5 

WPS 202 Wood Struc. Prop 3 

FOR 211 Dendrology (Angiosperms) 2 

FOR 201 Intro, to For. Mensuration 2 

English-Speech Elec 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

FOR 272 Forest Mensuration 3 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

Humanity- Social Science Elec 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



SUMMER CAMP 

FOR 204 Silviculture 2 

FOR 263 Dendrology 1 

FOR 264 Forest Protection 2 

FOR 274 Map. & Mensuration 4 

FOR 284 Utilization 1 

10 



All students select an option by the beginning of the junior year at the latest. 

JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
ENG 301 Intro 



Credits 



to Forest Insects 3 

ST 31 IF Intro, to Statistics 3 

FOR 219 Forest Econ. & Oper 3 

Humanity-Social Science Elec 3 

Option Requirement 3 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

FOR 452 Silvics 4 

PP (FOR) 318 Forest Pathology 4 

Humanity-Social Science Elec 3 

Option Requirement 3 

Free Elective 3 



17 



WORK EXPERIENCE* 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

FOR 405 Forest Land Management 5 FOR 406 Forest Land Inventory and 

Option Requirements 8 Planning 6 

Free Elective 3 Option Requirements 9 



16 



16 



' The Freshman year course offerings as shown here assume that entrance test scores suggest 
readiness for MA 112 and CH 101. Appropriate substitutions will be made where test scores indicate 
the need to start at a different level. 

"Three months of acceptable work experience are required for graduation. 

Hours Required for Graduation 139 



Recreation Resources Administration 

Biltmore Hall 

Professor T. I. Hines, Head of the Department 

Professors: W. E. Smith, R. E. Sternloff; Associate Professor: M. R. Warren Jr.; Adjunct Associate 
Professor: J. S. Stevens Jr.; Associate Professors Emeriti: G. A. Hammon, L. L. Miller, C. C. Stott; 
Assistant Professors: D. L. Erickson, P. K. McKnelly, C. D. Siderelis; Adjunct Assistant Professors: 
J. H. Brendle Jr., H. K. Cordell. J. H. Moses; Teaching Technicians: B. E. Clapp, B. E. Wilson; 
Adjunct Instructors: R. L. Buckner, W. C. Singletary Jr. 

139 



Standards adopted by the recreation profession make college graduation a require- 
ment for professional recreation employment. North Carolina State University has 
facilities, staff, curriculum, program and an established reputation for comprehen- 
sive professional education in recreation and parks. 

The curriculum of Recreation Resources Administration offers a broad general 
educational background, basic professional and technical courses, and the oppor- 
tunity to specialize in a particular field of recreation. 

RECREATION RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 

The recreation resources administration curriculum fulfills the needs of the 
graduate who will be employed by federal, state and local governmental agencies, 
private enterprises, industry and business, voluntary and quasi-public agencies 
and other private groups. General education courses are in biology, psychology, 
history and political science, English, mathematics, chemistry and economics. 
Specialized courses are in statistics, research methods, computer science, and land- 
scape horticulture. Professional courses, applying directly to the needs of the re- 
creator and his profession, cover recreation philosophy, management techniques and 
skills, fiscal operation, supervision, comprehensive and site planning, programming, 
administration, etc. 

CONCENTRATIONS 

A student may study the application of recreation management to a particular 
environment by following one of these concentrations : 

Commercial Recreation — A background in economics, personnel management, 
accounting, marketing and business is necessary. 

Institutional Recreation — Youth service agencies, corrective institutions and 
private agencies require that a graduate have emphasis in sociology and psy- 
chology. 

Urban Park Management — Additional courses in applied biology, horticulture, 
soils, municipal government and community organization are required. 

Natural Resource Recreation Management — Requires professional competence 
in natural resource management where there is a major concern with the preserva- 
tion, wise use and improvement of recreation resources and opportunities as they 
occur in the forest environment. 

Recreation Planning — A background is required in air photo interpretation, 
economics, governmental planning and community organization in addition to the 
core curriculum courses. 

Recreation Program Management — A broad knowledge in face-to-face leadership 
techniques and skills involving the promotion and management of athletics, arts 
and crafts, music, dramatics and other recreation activities. 

Natural Resource Interpretive — The management and promotion of the natural 
resource interpretive program requires a background in communication skills and 
an emphasis in the biological sciences. 

Historical Resources Interpretive — The promotion, operation and management 
of the interpretive program provided for historical buildings and sites require the 
use of communicative knowledge and skills and a background in anthropology and 
history. 

RECREATION RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BS 100 General Biology 4 EB 201 Economics I or 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

FOR 101 Introduction to Forestry 1 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & BO 200 Plant Life or 

Calculus A or ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance 3-4 RRA 241 Recreation Resource Relat 3 

RRA 152 Introduction to Recreation 3 Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

15-16 17 

140 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



Spring Semester 



CH 101 General Chemistry I or 

CH 111 Foundations of Chemistry 4 

RRA 215 Maintenance & Operations I .... 3 
SOC 202 Principles of Sociology or 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 3 

Elective 3 

Writing Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Credits 
3 



RRA 216 Maintenance & Operations II 
FOR (WPS) 273 Quantitative Methods 
in Forest Resources or 
Introduction to Computers & 

Their Uses 3 

American Govt. System or 

Local Governmental Systems 3 

Introduction to Statistics 3 

Concentration 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



CSC 200 

PS 201 
PS 206 
ST 311 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology .... 4 RRA 359 Recreation & Park Supervision . 3 

RRA 341 Prin. of Recreation Palnning ... 3 RRA 451 Facility & Site Planning 3 

RRA 358 The Recreation Program 4 • Concentration 6 

i Concentration 6 Free Elective 3 

I 7 15 

SUMMER SESSION 
(9 weeks) 

RRA 475 Recreation and Park Internship 9 



Fall Semester 



HS 201 Principles of Horticulture or 

2HS 342 Landscape Horticulture 3 

RRA 453 Admin. Policies & Procedures . . 3 

Social Science-Humanity Elective 3 

1 Concentration 3 

Free Elective 3 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

RRA 454 Recreation & Park Finance .... 3 
RRA 491 Spec. Prob. in Recreation or 

SOC 416 Research Methods 3 

'Concentration 6 

Free Elective 3 



15 



15 



Hours Required for Graduation 136 



Wood and Paper Science 

Biltmore Hall 

Professor I. S. Goldstein, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: A. C. Barefoot, R. M. Carter, E. B. Cowling, E. L. Ellwood, J. S. Gratzl, C. A. Hart, R. G. 
Hitchings, R. G. Pearson, R. J. Thomas; Adjunct Professors: P. Koch, W. T. McKean, R. F. Vokes; 
Professor Emeritus: A. J. Stamm; Associate Professors: H. Chang, R. C. Gilmore, R. H. Reeves, 
C. N. Rogers, D. H. J. Steensen; Adjunct Associate Professors: W. T. Gladstone, T. K Kirk, K. P. 
Kringstad; Associate Professor Emeritus: C. G. Landes; Assistant Professor: M. W. Kelly; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor: A G. Mullin; Assistant Professor Emeritus: H. D. Cook; Teaching Technician: 
T. Gemmer; Associate Members of the Faculty: A. Prak (Industrial Engineering), V. T. Stannett 
(Chemical Engineering) 

EXTENSION 

Professor: M. P. Levi, Leader, Wood Products Section; Associate Professor Emeritus: L. H. Hobbs; 
Assistant Professor: S. J. Hanover; Instructor: E. L. Dean; Specialists: R. C. Allison, L. G. Jahn 



• Of the 24 hours in the various concentration areas, 9 to 16 hours are required specifically for the 

selected concentration and 8 to 15 hours are elected from controlled areas. 
2 Required for Urban Park Management Concentration. 



141 



The wood industries have been a vital part of North Carolina's economy for over 
300 years. North Carolina ranks high in the manufacture of hardwood, plywood, 
and wooden furniture, rough lumber and railroad tie production and the manufac- 
ture of pulp and paper. The value of forest products produced annually in the state 
exceeds three billion dollars. Seventeen percent of the state's labor force is em- 
ployed in the wood industries. 

The Department of Wood and Paper Science offers two curricula leading to 
Bachelor of Science degrees — wood science and technology and pulp and paper 
science and technology — to educate persons for careers in the wood based and 
allied industries or in government agencies concerned with wood resources. Wood 
science and technology is concerned with the technical aspects of wood and its 
processing into reconstituted and manufactured products. Pulp and paper science 
and technology deals specifically with wood fibers and their processing for paper 
and wood based chemicals. 

PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Robertson Laboratory 

Professor R. G. Hitchings, In Charge 

This curriculum prepares people for technical work in the rapidly growing pulp 
and paper industry which ranks fifth among all American industries. This is pri- 
marily a Southern industry with over 60 percent of the nation's pulpwood produced 
in the South. Careers include process engineers, product development engineers, 
technical service engineers, quality control supervisors, process control chemists 
and production supervisors. After basic science courses, the students study in the 
specialized Robertson Pulp and Paper Laboratory in wood pulp processes, chemical 
and by-products recovery, pulp bleaching, and in the various papermaking opera- 
tions, such as refining, sizing, filling, dyeing, formation, coating and the converting 
of paper. 

Pulp and paper is a regional program approved by the Southern Regional Educa- 
tion Board as the undergraduate program to serve the Southeast in this field. 
Approximately 70 undergraduate scholarships are granted annually to students by 
more than 100 company members composing the Pulp and Paper Foundation. 

All pulp and paper majors spend at least one summer working in a pulp or 
paper mill designated by the University. One hour of academic credit is granted 
after completion of 12 weeks of mill work and presentation of a satisfactory report. 
In addition to this minimum summer work requirement, students are urged to work 
in mills the two other summers between academic years to gain valuable practical 
experience. 

This curriculum leads to a Bachelor of Science in pulp and paper science and 
technology. Three programs are available emphasizing the technological, engi- 
neering or scientific aspects of pulping and papermaking. The technology program 
provides a broad background for those students anticipating careers in mill opera- 
tions or with paper industry supplier organizations. Greater depth in the underlying 
scientific principles or their applications can be obtained from the science and 
engineering programs, which also provide a good foundation for graduate study. A 
fifth year program leading to a second degree, a Bachelor of Science in chemical 
engineering, is available. 

PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 1 12 Analytic Geometry & WPS 242 Fiber Analysis 3 

Calculus A* 4 MA 212 Analytic Geometry & 



142 



WPS 101 Intro, to Wood and Paper 

Science 1 

Social Science-Humanity Elective** 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Calculus B* 3 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

Physical Education 1 



16 



* Honors students take MA 102, 201 and 202 
** Basic economics course recommended 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 220 
PY 211 

ST 361 



Credits 

Introductory Organic Chemistry ... 4 

General Physics* 4 

Introduction to Statistics for 

Engineers 3 

Physical Education 1 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



18 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

PY 212 General Physics* 4 

WPS (FOR) 273 Quantitative Methods in 

Forest Resources 3 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



* Honors students take PY 205, 208 



Fall Semester 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Credits 

CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry . . 4 

CHE 301 Elements of Chemical 

Engineering 3 

Pulp & Paper Internship 1 

Pulp & Paper Technology I 3 

Introduction to Wood and 

Pulping Chemistry 1 

Energy & Energy Transfor- 
mations 3 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 



18 



Credits 



WPS 211 
WPS 321 
WPS 331 

MAE 307 



Spring Semester 

Engineering Elective* 3 

CHE 302 Elements of Chemical 

Engineering 3 

WPS 322 Pulp & Paper Technology II 3 

WPS 332 Wood & Pulping Chemistry 4 

Free Elective 3 



16 



* EE 331, 350, IE 301 or CHE 225 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

WPS 471 
WPS 411 
WPS 491 



Credits 



Credits 



Pulping Process Analysis 3 

Pulp/Paper Unit Processes 3 

Senior Problems in Wood & 

Paper Science 1 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 

WPS 413 Paper Properties & Additives ... 3 

Technical Elective 3 



16 



Spring Semester 

WPS 403 Paper Process Analysis 3 

WPS 412 Pulp & Paper Unit Processes II . 3 

WPS 463 Plant Inspections 1 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Technical Elective 3 



16 



Hours Required for Graduation 131 



PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 



Fall Semester 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I . . 4 
WPS 101 Intro, to Wood and Paper 

Science 1 

Social Science- Humanity Elective* 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 
ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 



CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II . . 4 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

WPS 242 Fiber Analysis 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



* Basic economics course recommended 



143 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III . 4 

PY 206 General Physics 4 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

MA 301 Applied Differential 

Equations I 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 



Credits 

3 

CH 432 Physical Chemistry I Laboratory . 1 

WPS 211 Pulp and Paper Internship 1 

WPS 321 Pulp and Paper Technology I ... 3 
ST 361 Introduction to Statistics for 

Engineers 3 

CH 316 Quantitative Analysis 4 

Free Elective 3 

18 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 433 Physical Chemistiy II 3 

WPS 322 Pulp and Paper Technology II . . . 3 

WPS 332 Wood & Pulping Chemistry 4 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 

Technical Electives 4 



17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

Pulping Process Analysis 3 

Senior Problems in Wood 

& Paper Science 1 

Paper Properties and 

Additives 3 

Social Science-Humanity Electives 6 

Technical Elective 3 



16 



WPS 471 
WPS 491 



WPS 413 



Spring Semester Credits 

WPS 403 Paper Process Analysis 3 

WPS 463 Plant Inspections 1 

Free Elective 3 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 

Technical Electives 6 



16 



Hours Required for Graduation 131 



PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Semester 



Credits 



Fall 

ENG 112H Composition and Reading* .... 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

WPS 101 Intro, to Wood and Paper 

Science 1 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I ... 4 

Social Science-Humanity Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

WPS 242 Fiber Analysis 3 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II . . 4 

CSC HI Algorithmic Languages I 2 

Physical Education 1 

16 



If not qualified, take ENG 111 and 112 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

PY 206 General Physics 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III . 4 
CHE 206 Chemical Processes Principles ... 3 
Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

MA 301 Applied Differential 

Equations I 3 

CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

18 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credit* Spring Semester Credits 

WPS 211 Pulp & Paper Internship 1 WPS 322 Pulp and Paper Technology II . . 3 

WPS 321 Pulp & Paper Technology I 3 CHE 315 Chemical Process Thermo- 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3 dynamics 3 

CH 432 Physical Chemistry I Laboratory . . 1 CHE 327 Separation Processes I 3 

144 



CHE 311 Transport Processes I 3 WPS 332 Wood and Pulping Chemistry .... 4 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 — 

— 16 

17 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

WPS 471 Pulping Process Analysis 3 WPS 403 Paper Process Analysis 3 

WPS 411 Pulp & Paper Unit Processes I . . 3 WPS 412 Pulp & Paper Unit Processes II . 3 

WPS 491 Senior Problems in Wood & WPS 463 Plant Inspections 1 

Paper Science 1 Technical Elective 3 

WPS 413 Paper Properties and Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 

Additives 3 Free Elective 3 

Social Science-Humanity Electives 6 — 

— 16 
16 Hours Required for Graduation 131 

WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Professor R. M. Carter, In Charge 

Wood science and technology is an applied science of an inter-disciplinary nature 
utilizing the natural sciences, mathematics, engineering and economics to under- 
stand wood and its processing. It is a materials science, but also involves industrial 
manufacturing and management. The wood technologist's job is related to engi- 
neering; but, unlike the engineer, one's educational exposure to wood science 
makes one capable of applying knowledge in such wood processes as machining, 
seasoning, gluing and finishing. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The wood technologist's scientific engineering, industrial knowledge and specialty 
in the properties and behavior of wood qualify him or her for positions in today's 
modern wood manufacturing industries. 

Careers include industrial positions with companies manufacturing lumber, 
veneer, plywood, particle and fiber boards and consumer wood products such as 
furniture. Wood technologists are also in demand by suppliers to wood manufactur-" 
ing industries, such as chemical and machinery companies. Policy making oppor- 
tunities are available with state and federal government in research, marketing 
or extension activities. 

Wood is a renewable biological resource requiring less energy for processing 
than other materials. Therefore, the wood technologist can help improve the 
environment by developing cleaner processes, working with a renewable resource 
and creating policies governing environmental development. 

FIELDS OF SPECIALIZATION 

The program provides the opportunity to follow concentrations in a discipline 
outside the department to the extent of a minimum of 21 credit hours. The student 
may develop a second area of concentration which can be applied to the field of 
wood science and technology and which can also provide a base for subsequent 
graduate work in wood science and technology or in the concentration. Concentra- 
tions are available in: a) economics, b) quantitative analysis, c) biology and bio- 
chemistry, d) chemistry, e) harvesting operations and political science. Concen- 
trations other than those listed may be arranged through the department. 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

A dual degree program is available with the Department of Economics and 
Business whereby students can obtain, in addition to a Bachelor of Science in 
wood science and technology, a second Bachelor of Science in economics. 

Additional credits beyond those required for the single degree program are 
necessary. Capable students can usually obtain additional credits within the four 
years of the regular undergraduate program. 

145 



CURRICULUM 

Students study nature of wood as a natural resource and its processing by means 
of a systematic study of the properties of wood and the processes involved in its 
utilization and manufacture. 

The curriculum's flexibility enables students to specialize in areas of interest as 
they apply to the wood science and technology field. Sound mathematics and natural 
science background allows a materials science approach to wood to develop con- 
currently with training in the processing technology of wood and wood based 
products and in decision making applied to wood product manufacturing. 

After the sophomore year students attend a six-week wood process laboratory 
practicum in the Brandon P. Hodges Wood Products Laboratory. Students then 
intern in industry or in institutional research. 

During the program's final two years, students choose a concentration in 
another discipline outside of the department. 

WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A* . 4 MA 212 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B* . 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

ENG HI Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

WPS 101 Intro, to Wood and Paper BS 100 General Biology or 

Science 1 BO 200 Plant Life 4 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 

16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EB 201 Economics I or Social Science-Humanity Elective 3 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 WPS 203 Wood Structure & Properties II . 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 WPS 220 Wood Protection 3 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 Concentration Elective 3 

WPS 202 Wood Structure & Properties ... 3 Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

15 16 

SUMMER PRACTICUM 

Credits 

WPS 205 Wood Products Practicum 5 

WPS 210 Forest Products Internship 1 

6 
JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 Social Science-Humanity Elective 3 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics for WPS 302 Wood Processing II 3 

Engineers I 3 WPS 316 Wood-Polymer Principles 3 

WPS 301 Wood Processing I 3 WPS 344 Introduction to Quality 

WPS 315 Introduction to Wood- Polymer Control 3 

Principles 2 WPS 491 Senior Problems in Wood & 

Concentration Elective 3 Paper Science 1 

— Concentration Elective 3 



15 



14 



16 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Social Science- Humanity Elective 3 WPS 442 Wood Mechanics & Design 3 

WPS 434 Wood Operations 3 Concentration Electives 6 

WPS 441 Introduction to Wood Mechanics . 2 Free Electives 6 

WPS 491 Senior Problems in Wood & — 

Paper Science 2 15 

Concentration Electives 6 

Hours Required for Graduation 129 

16 



* Students with mathematical aptitude and interest are encouraged to substitute MA 102, 
and MA 202 for the mathematical sequence listed. 

146 



LIBERAL ARTS 

R. O. Tilman, Dean 

W. B. Toole III, Associate Dean 

The School of Liberal Arts offers programs of study which lead to baccalaureate 
and advanced degrees in the disciplines comprising the humanities and social 
sciences, and also offers courses in these areas which are part of the programs of 
all undergraduate students in the University. In this way the University provides 
an opportunity for its students to prepare for a full life in professions and occupa- 
tions that require intellectual flexibility, broad knowledge, and a basic compre- 
hension of human beings and their problems. 

Nine departments are included in the School of Liberal Arts: economics and 
business (also a department in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences), 
English, history, foreign languages and literatures, philosophy and religion, physi- 
cal education, political science, sociology and anthropology (also a department in 
the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences) and speech-communication. Under- 
graduate majors are offered in economics, accounting, business management, Eng- 
lish, history, French, Spanish, philosophy, political science, sociology, speech- 
communication, and multi-disciplinary studies. In some departments special concen- 
trations are available within the major programs: e.g., writing and editing 
(English), criminal justice (political science or sociology), and social work (sociol- 
ogy). A teacher education option is available in English, speech-communication, 
French, Spanish, and social studies (history, economics, political science, sociology). 
Degrees granted include the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, the Master 
of Arts, and the Doctor of Philosophy, as well as professional degrees in economics, 
political science, and sociology. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS PROGRAM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

History* 3 History 3 

Mathematics** 3-4 Mathematics 3-4 

Foreign Laguage 201 (Intermediate) *** .... 3 Philosophy***** 3 

Social Science**** 3 Social Science 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 



16-17 16-17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Literature****** 3 Literature 3 

Natural Science******* 3-4 Natural Science 3-4 

Elective 3 Social Science 3 

Social Science 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Area Elective******** 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 



16-17 16-17 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Major********* 6 Major 9 

Electives 9 Electives 6 

15 15 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Major 9 Major 6 

Electives 6 Electives 9 

15 15 

Hours Required for Graduation 124 

147 



....... 



• A two-semester program including a course concerned with pre-industrial Western or non- 
Western societies (HI 204, 207, 208. 209. 215. 216, 263, 264, 265, or 266), and another 
dealing with the United States or post-industrial Western societies (HI 205, 210. 211, 233, 
241. 242. 243. 244, or 272). 

• Two semesters required for economics and business or sociology majors (MA 111-112 or 
the equivalent required for economics and business; the same recommended for sociology 
but any two mathematics courses other than MA 115 allowed). For all other liberal arts 
majors the requirement may be satisfied with any two mathematics courses other than MA 
115 or one course other than MA 115 plus a course in computer science, statistics, or logic. 

• Proficiency required at the first -semester intermediate level in French, Spanish, German, 
Russian, Italian, Latin, Greek, or Portuguese. Proficiency at the second-semester inter- 
mediate level in one of these languages is required for English, speech -communication, and 
foreign language majors. 

• The requirements call for twelve hours of social science representing at least three of the 
following disciplines: anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, sociology. At 
least nine of these hours must be outside the student's major field. 

• Three hours of philosophy, exclusive of logic (PHI 201 and 335), are required. 

" This requirement calls for any two of the following survey courses in British literature, 
American literature, and foreign language literature: Eng 261, Eng 262, Eng 265, Eng 266, 
FLG 301, FLG 302, FLS 301, FLS 302, FLF 301. FLF 302, FLS 303, FLS 304. 
This requirement calls for a minimum of eight credit hours including one basic introductory 
course from physics, chemistry, or the biological sciences [CH 101, CH 103, CH 105 (with 
CH 104 lab), CH 107, CH 111; PY 205, PY 208, PY 211, PY 212, PY 231, PY 232; BS 100 
or BS 105; BO 200]. The remaining hours may be completed through other courses 
chosen from the preceding list or through any of the following courses: PY 221. PY 223, 
ZO 221, ZO 400, ZO 490: BO (ZO) 360; GN 301; NTR 301, GY 101, GY 120, GY 208; MAS 
200; MY 201. 

One of the following courses in fine arts, literature in translation, religion, or speech- 
communication is required: ENG 290, ENG 325, ENG 346, ENG 347, ENG 397; FLR 303, 
FLR 304; GRK 320; FLF 491. FLG 498, FLS 491; all FL 250 courses; Art 200; Art 
History; DN 441; MUS 200, MUS 210, MUS 215. MUS 220, MUS 301, MUS 302, MUS 320; 
any course in religion; SP 340, SP 361. SP 420, SP 430. 

Major requirements for the Bachelor of Arts range from 30-42 hours. Most of the major 
programs call for 30 hours of work above the basic courses in a discipline. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE PROGRAM 



Fall Semester 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



Credits 



CH 10 1 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

Mathematics* 4 

Physical Education 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective** 3 



15 



CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 



CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Mathematics 3-4 

Physical Education 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 



14-15 



Fall Semester 

PHI 205 Problems & Types of Philosophy -. . 3 

Mathematics 3-4 

PY 205 or 211 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 1 

Foreign Language/English Literature*** ... 3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Course I — Major**** 3 

Mathematics 3 

PY 208 or 212 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 1 

Foreign Languages/English Literature .... 3 



14-15 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
BS 100 General 



Credits 



Biology 4 

History or Philosophy of Science***** 3 

Course II — Major 3 

Course III — Major 3 

Advanced Technology or Science 
Course I****** 3 . 4 



16-17 



148 



Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Course IV — Major 3 

Course V — Major 3 

Advanced Technology or Science 

Course II 3-4 

Zoology 201 Animal Life or 

Botany 200 Plant Life 4 

16-17 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Course VI — Major 3 Course VIII — Major 3 

Course VII — Major 3 Course IX (Seminar in Major) 3 

Advanced Technology or Science Course II .3-4 Advanced Technology or Science 

Electives 6 Course IV 3-4 

Electives 6 



15-16 



15-16 
Total Hours Required for Graduation 127 



* One of the following four-course sequences: 1) MA 102. 201, 202 and 231. 301, 312, 405; 2) MA 
112,212. 114, 214. 
** Twelve hours in humanities and/or social sciences in areas outside major discipline. 
*** Six hours of foreign language and/or English literature at 200 level or above. 
**** Twenty-seven hours are required in economics, English, history, philosophy, or political science. 
***** One of the following: HI 322, HI 321, PHI 405, HI 341. or MA 433. 
****** A 15-hour concentration is required in some area of science or technology. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION IN THE B.A. AND B.S . PROGRAMS 

Cooperative Education in Liberal Arts seeks to broaden the student's intellectual 
horizons and at the same time provide an introduction to the world of business, 
industry, government, or finance in preparation for a career after graduation. The 
freshman and senior years are usually spent on campus while the sophomore and 
junior years are devoted to alternate periods of on-campus study and off-campus 
work. The student is paid by the employer for work experiences. Ordinarily the pro- 
gram takes five years to complete, but students who are willing to take an 
average of 18 hours a semester and attend summer school can finish in four years. 

Further information can be obtained from the Director of Cooperative Education 
in Liberal Arts (124-D Tompkins Hall). 

JOINT LIBERAL ARTS-ENGINEERING PROGRAM 

Some students may want to combine a Bachelor of Science in engineering with 
either a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts. When the two 
are carried along together, the double degree program can be completed in five 
years. Those interested should contact the Director of the Freshman Engineering 
Division and the Associate Dean of Liberal Arts. 



Economics and Business 

Patterson Hall 

Professor W. D. Toussaint, Head of the Department 

Professor B. M. Olsen, Assistant Head of the Department and Coordinator of Ad- 
vising 

Professor F. D. Sobering, Assistant Head of the Department, In Charge of Extension 

H. T. Daniel, Scheduling Officer 

TEACHING, RESEARCH AND EXTENSION 

Professors: R. C. Brooks, A. J. Coutu, E. W. Erickson, R. M. Fearn, D. G. Harwood. D. M. Hoover, 
L. A. Ihnen, P. R. Johnson, R. A. King, H. L. Liner, G. A. Mathia. T. E. Nichols Jr.. E. C. Pasour 
Jr., E. A. Proctor, C. R. Pugh, R. A. Schrimper. J. A. Seagraves, R. L. Simmons, C. B. Turner, 
W. L. Turner, C. R. Weathers, R. C. Wells, J. C. Williamson Jr.; Professors Emeriti: A. J. Bartley, 
D. R. Dixon, J. G. Sutherland (USDA), E. W. Swanson; Associate Professors: J. G. Allgood, D. S. 
Ball, G. A. Carlson, J. S. Chappell, R. D. Dahle, M. M. El-Kammash, R. S. Fenwick, B. L. Gardner, 
H. C. Gilliam Jr. (USDA), L. H. Hammond, C. W. Harrell Jr., D. M. Holthausen, H. A. Homme, 
D. N. Hyman, Thomas Johnson, C. P. Jones, E. W. Jones, F. A. Mangum Jr., C. J. Messere. D. F. 
Neuman, R. J. Peeler Jr., R. K. Perrin, J. C. Poindexter Jr., P. S. Stone. R. E. Sylla, J. W. Wilson; 
Associate Professor Emeritus: R. S. Boal; Assistant Professors: R. L. Clark, L. E. Danielson, 
D. B. Diamond, J. E. Easley Jr., D. J. Flath, A. R. Gallant. T. J. Grennes. C. R. Knoeber, J. S. 
Lapp, M. P. Loeb. R. B. McBurney Jr., M. B. McEIroy. L. B. Perkinson (USDA), W. P. Pinna, 
T. M. Reynolds, W. J. Weasels; Visiting Assistant Professors: G. M. Scobie. R. B. Vernon; Assistant 

149 



Professors Emeriti: J. C. Matthews Jr., E. M. Stallings, O. G. Thompson, Ruby P. Uzzle; Instructors: 
A. M. Beals Jr., W. P. Brown, M. R. Hilliard. M. T. Holcomb. D. M. Holmes, J. M. Jefferys, E. W. 
Leonard. T. N. Taylor; Special Lecturers: C. L. Bergold, G. A. Gunderson, W. P. Windham; Exten- 
sion Specialists: C. E. Hammond, S. C. Riddick, S. R. Sutter; Associate Members of the Faculty: 
R. H. Berhard (Industrial Engineering). W. D. Cooper (Textile Technology). D. L. Holley (Forestry) 

The economics and business program develops in the student critical and 
analytical skills which underlie the ability to understand contemporary problems 
and institutions, both in their historical setting and under conditions of change. 
The curriculum furnishes the academic background necessary for positions in indus- 
try, government service and graduate work (see pages 12-13 and consult the Gradu- 
ate Catalog) in economics, business and the social sciences. 

The Department of Economics and Business offers degrees in several under- 
graduate fields of study. These include the Bachelor of Arts degrees in accounting, 
business management, economics and the Bachelor of Science degree in economics. 
In addition, the department offers the social studies teacher education option to 
prepare the student for "A" certification in North Carolina secondary schools. 

The department is administered jointly by the Schools of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences and Liberal Arts. For information on agricultural economics, see pages 
66-67. 

The department also provides service courses for the various technical schools 
and the Division of Continuing Education. An increasing number of curricula now 
offer a minor program in economics or business. 

The department maintains a library including technical reference books, major 
professional journals and government publications. Research publications from 
other institutions throughout the United States are on file. Computational facilities 
are available for students whose research problems involve extensive analysis of 
data, as well as for those students who want to learn to use computer facilities. 
The department has a specially-trained clerical and programming staff and has 
access to an IBM System/370 Model 165 operated by the Triangle University 
Computational Center. Access is also available to other medium speed terminals 
and an IBM System/360 Model 40 located on the University campus. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in economics consists of 27 hours in prescribed 
and elected courses. Of these, 12 hours are required in the core. The remaining 15 
hours are economics electives which are primarily society oriented. 

Credits Credits 

EB 301 Production and Prices 3 EB 490 Senior Seminar in Economics 3 

EB 302 Aggregate Economic Analysis: Restrictive Electives in Economics 15 

Theory and Policy 3 — 

EB 350 Economics and Business 27 

Statistics 3 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ACCOUNTING 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in accounting consists of 39 hours in prescribed 
and elected courses. Of these, 12 hours are required in the core. The remaining 27 
hours are divided among six hours of electives in economics and 21 hours in 
accounting courses. 

Credit* Credits 

EB 301 Production and Prices 3 ACC 468 Professional Accountancy 

EB 302 Aggregate Economic Analysis: Resume 3 

Theory and Policy 3 Restricted Electives in Economics 6 

EB 350 Economics and Business Accounting Concentration 21 



39 



Statistics* 3 

* ST 311. 861, or 371 may be substituted for EB 350. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in business management consists of 33 hours in 
prescribed and elected courses. Of these, 18 hours are required as the core. The 

150 



remaining 15 hours are divided among six hours of electives in economics and 
nine hours from three of the five areas of business concentration. 

Credits Credits 

ACC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of EB 307 Business Law I 3 

Financial Reporting 3 EB 490 Senior Seminar in Economics 3 

EB 301 Production and Prices 3 Restricted Electives in Economics 6 

EB 302 Aggregate Economic Analysis: Electives from Areas of Business 

Theory and Policy 3 Concentration 9 

EB 350 Introduction to Methods of — 

Economic Analysis* 3 33 



* ST 311, 361. or 371 may be substituted for EB 350. 

SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHER EDUCATION OPTION 

The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in economics, social studies teacher 
education option, consists of a modified economics major plus 24 hours of comple- 
mentary courses in history, sociology, anthropology and political science. Additional 
courses in psychology and education (including student teaching) in the 129 hour 
program complete the requirements for "A" certification. The social studies teacher 
education program is open to majors in economics, history, political science, and 
sociology and anthropology. Admission to the program, however, is limited to ap- 
proximately 15 students per semester. Applicants are selected on the basis of aca- 
demic competition and dedication to teaching. 

Credits Credits 

EB 301 Production and Prices 3 Restricted Electives in Economics 15 

EB 302 Aggregate Economic Analysis: — 

Theory and Policy 3 Total Economics Courses 24 

EB 350 Economics and Business Complementary Courses in History 

Statistics* 3 and Social Sciences 24 



EB 


201 


EB 


202 


EB 


301 


EB 


302 



27 



* ST 311, 361, or 371 may be substituted for EB 350. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in economics consists of 27 hours 
in prescribed and elected courses. Of these, 15 or 18 hours are required as the core. 
Nine of the remaining hours must consist of economics electives. 

Credits Credits 

Economics I 3 EB 350 Economics and Business 

Economics II* " 3 Statistics** 3 

Production and Prices 3 EB 490 Senior Seminar in Economics 3 

Aggregate Economic Analysis: Restricted Electives in Economics 9 

Theory and Policy 3 

* EB 202 may be waived subject to the approval of the student's faculty adviser. 
** ST 311. 361, or 371 may be substituted for EB 350. 

Elective Courses 

Students must complete at least two courses selected from the specified list of 
economics electives, the two intermediate theory courses (EB 301 and EB 302) 
and one of the basic statistics courses before enrolling in Senior Seminar (EB 490 
or EB 468). 

These electives, primarily society oriented are: EB 304, EB 370 (HI 370), EB 
371 (HI 371), 410, 413, 422, 430, 43i, 435, 436, 442, 448, 451, 475, 491, 501, 502, 515, 
521, 533, 540, 550, 551, 555, 561 (ST 561), 570, and 574 (SOC 574). 

Additional firm-oriented economics electives are available. These courses are 
often considered business courses and are intended to provide skills for dealing 
with problems at firm level. The areas of business concentration are: 

Finance: EB 304, 415, 420 
Business Management: EB 310, 525, 535 
Marketing: EB 311, 313, 430, 521 
Personnel: EB 326, 332, 431 
Production: EB 303, 325, 523, 551 

151 



Courses from other departments may be used to fulfill business concentration 
requirements upon approval of the Department of Economics and Business. 

English 

Winston Hall 

Professor L. S. Champion, Head of the Department 
Professor R. B. White Jr., Assistant Head of the Department 
Professor P. E. Blank, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: J. D. Durant, M. Halperen. A. S. Knowles, B. G. Koonce Jr., F. H. Moore Jr., G. Owen 
Jr.. W. B. Toole III, P. Williams Jr.; Professors Emeriti: L. C. Hartley, H. G. Kincheloe, R. G. 
Walser; Associate Professors: L. J. Betts Jr., P. E. Blank Jr., J. W. Clark Jr., E. P. Dandridge Jr., 
J. B. Easley, H. A. Hargrave, L. F. Jeffers, D. M. Lucas, W. E. Meyers, C. E. Moore, M. S. 
Reynolds. D. D. Short, N. G. Smith. J. J. Smoot. H. C. West, M. C. Williams; Assistant Professors: 
J. S. Anhorn, B. J. Baines, M. M. Brandt, E. D. Clark, V. C. Downs, E. D. Engel, J. M. Grimwood, 
A. H. Harrison. W. E. Haskin, M. T. Hester, L. T. Holley, J. A. Kilby Jr., M. F. King, V. B. 
Lentz, L. H. MacKethan, N. B. Rich, K. L. Seidel, J. N. Wall Jr., R. V. Young Jr.; Instructors: 
G. W. Barrax, C. M. Blackman, G. B. Blank. J. H. Bolch, A. E. Brown, D. P. Ewing, J. S. Griffin, 
J. H. Hobbs, C. R. Horner, M. B. Jones, S. B. Jordan, H. J. Joseph, A. H. McDonald, G. I. Matthews, 
T. J. O'Sullivan, K. S. Spears. G. L. Stephenson, T. Toher, J. P. Williams; Part-Time Instructor: 
S. Y. Graham 

The Department of English offers basic and advanced courses in composition, 
language, and literature. The freshman courses, common to all curricula and pre- 
requisite to all advanced courses in English, are designed to give intensive training 
and practice in written communication, in addition to an introduction to literary 
types. Courses in communication of technical information and in creative and 
advanced expository writing are offered to meet requirements in special curricula 
and to provide elective credits. Advanced courses are available for a major in 
literature (Bachelor of Arts program), majors in English — writing and editing 
option (Bachelor of Arts program) or teacher certification option (Bachelor of Arts 
program), and a concentration in literature (Bachelor of Science program), as well 
as for general electives. 

For graduate degrees, see pages 12-13. 

B.A. PROGRAM, MAJORS IN ENGLISH 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Program — The student must schedule 36 semester hours 
beyond the usual six hours in freshman composition. Basic requirements include 
the sophomore survey of English literature, a course in Shakespeare, and at least 
one course in American writers. Beyond these courses, the student may pursue 
special interests within the limits of two recommended categories. In the final 
semester, a special seminar (ENG 496) will serve as a capstone to one's study. 

Bachelor of Arts in English — Writing and Editing Option — The student must 
schedule 36 semester hours beyond the usual six hours in freshman composition. 
Courses are included in journalism, technical writing, public speaking, radio, 
television and literature. In the final semester, a special seminar (ENG 496) will 
serve as a capstone to one's study. Additionally the student must schedule 15-18 
semester hours in a track or discipline in which one wishes to apply communication 
skills. 

B.A. PROGRAM, TEACHER EDUCATION OPTION IN ENGLISH 

English majors may enroll in the teacher education option offered by the School 
of Liberal Arts in cooperation with the School of Education. Students who complete 
this program are eligible to apply for certification to teach English in secondary 
schools in North Carolina. The requirements of the program include 28 semester 
hours in professional courses and 36 semester hours in English beyond the usual 
six hours in freshman composition. Students desiring to enter this program should 
declare their intention before the spring of the sophomore year and are required 
to file a formal application for admission which must be approved in order for them 
to participate. 

152 



B.S. PROGRAM, CONCENTRATION IN ENGLISH 

Bachelor of Science Program — The student, in consultation with his or her 
department adviser, must schedule 27 semester hours beyond the usual six hours in 
freshman composition, including the senior seminar. 

Foreign Languages and Literatures 

Harrelson Hall 

Professor A. A. Gonzalez, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor Gilbert G. Smith, Assistant Head of the Department and Co- 
ordinator of Advising 

Professor: E. M. Stack; Professor Emeritus: G. W. Poland; Associate Professors: T. P. Feeny, G. 
Gonzalez, J. R. Kelly, M. Paschal, E. W. Rollins Jr., S. E. Simonsen, H. Tucker Jr.; Associate 
Professor Emeritus: F. J. Allred; Assistant Professors: S. T. Alonso, L. L. Cofreai, T. N. Hammond, 
W. M. Holler, B. Nogara, V. M. Prichard, C. E. Sorum. J. H. Stewart; Assistant Professor Emeritus: 
R. B. Hall; Instructors: S. de la Queriere, D. D. Girardi, E. M. Jezierski, L. K Stillman 

MAJORS IN FRENCH OR SPANISH 

All the general requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree must be met, in- 
cluding six hours of literature survey outside the major field. Degree designations 
are: B.A. in French Language and Literature, B.A. in Spanish Language and 
Literature, French Language and Literature Teacher Education option and Spanish 
Language and Literature Teacher Education option. 

Bachelor of Arts degree — Students must complete 36 hours beyond the ele- 
mentary courses (101-102), including a senior seminar. Majors must take 12 
additional hours of related studies in a second foreign language or in British and 
American literature. Spanish majors have the additional option of 12 hours in 
Hispanic studies. 

B.A. Program with Teacher Education Option — In collaboration with the School 
of Education, :he department offers a program upon completion of which graduates 
may be certified as secondary school foreign language teachers in the North Caro- 
lina publi •. school system. Candidates should advise their academic counsellor as 
early as possible for the proper planning of their curriculum. They should formally 
declare their intention by the spring semester of the sophomore year. 

No graduate degrees are given in foreign languages, but special courses and 
certification examinations are offered for advanced degree students. 

History 

Harrelson Hall 

Professor B. W. Wishy, Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor J. A. Mulholland, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: B. F. Beers, M. L. Brown Jr., M. S. Downs, R. W. Greenlaw, W. C. Harris, D. E. King, 
J. M. Riddle, S. Suval; Professors Emeriti: S. M. Noblin, L. W. Seegars; Associate Professors: 
J. R. Banker, W. H. Beezley. C. H. Carlton, R. N. Elliott. J. P. Hobbs, G. D. Newby. R. H. Sack, 
E. D. Sylla, M. E. Wheeler; Associate Professor Emeritus: L. W. Barnhardt; Adjunct Associate 
Professor: T. W. Mitchell; Assistant Professors: R. M. Collins, C. J. Constantin, J. E. Crisp. C. W. 
Harper, C. F. Kolb, A. J. LaVopa, J. A. Mulholland, R. G. O'Brien, D. M. Scott 

An understanding of the historical background of our times is expected of the 
educated person. The Department of History makes it possible for students to gain 
this understanding through a wide range and variety of courses at all levels from 
introductory through graduate. 

A wide range of introductory courses is available to satisfy the history require- 
ment or part of the humanities and social sciences requirement in most University 
curricula. Students in the School of Liberal Arts are required to take two courses 
in history — one dealing with a culture significantly different from our own in pre- 
industrial Western or non-Western societies and the other dealing with our own 

153 



culture in the United States or post-industrial Western societies. 

The Department of History in cooperation with the Division of Continuing Educa- 
tion makes available a variety of introductory courses by correspondence. Some in- 
troductory courses and most graduates courses are offered in the evening. 

For graduate degrees offered, see pages 12-13. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE PROGRAM 

A history major must take 30 hours of course work in history in addition to the 
six hours required of all students in the School of Liberal Ails. These 30 hours 
must include a senior seminar. At least 24 hours of the 30 must be at the 300 level 
or above. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS PROGRAM WITH TEACHER EDUCATION OPTION 

History majors may enroll in the teacher education program offered by the 
School of Liberal Arts in cooperation with the School of Education. Students who 
complete this program are eligible for certification to teach social studies in 
secondary schools in North Carolina. In addition to Bachelor of Arts degree re- 
quirements, students are required to take professional courses in education and 
psychology and additional social sciences courses. Students desiring to enter this 
program should declare their intention during their sophomore year. They are 
required to file an application for formal admission during their junior year. 
Admission is competitive and the criteria include an overall grade point average 
of 2.5 or better. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE PROGRAM 

A concentration in history involves 18 hours of course work beyond the six hours 
required of all students in the School of Liberal Arts, plus a senior seminar. Of the 
18 hours, at least 12 must be at the 300 level or above. 

Multi-Disciplinary Studies 

Multi-Disciplinary Studies Committee 

Professor R. S. Bryan (Philosophy and Religion), Chairmen/ 

Professor \V. B. Toole (English) 

Associate Professor W. C. Harris (History) 

Associate Professor M. M. Sawhney (Sociology and Anthropology) 

Associate Professor J. W. Wilson (Economics and Business) 

Professor Paul A. Bredenburg and Associate Professor W. Curtis Fitzgerald, Co- 
ordinators of Advising 

The multi-disciplinary studies program allows a student to design his or her 
own academic major. Instead of following the requirements for a major in one of 
the traditional disciplines, the candidate for the Bachelor of Arts degree in multi- 
disciplinary studies has the responsibility of organizing a concentration or field of 
specialization frtom two or more disciplines. A concentration in Latin American 
studies might, for example, combine related courses in language, literature, history, 
economics, sociology and political science. 

The freshman and sophomore basic requirements for the multi-disciplinary 
studies program are the same as for the other Bachelor of Arts programs in Liberal 
Arts. In satisfying basic requirements in language, humanities, social science, 
mathematics and natural science, the student should, whenever possible, choose 
those courses that are most appropriate as background for the courses in his oi- 
lier major concentration. 



154 



ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM 

To become a candidate for a major in multi-disciplinary studies, a student first 
secures application forms and information from the office of the dean of the School 
of Liberal Arts (Tompkins Hall, Room 118) or from the office of the chairman of 
the Multi-Disciplinary Studies Committee (Harrelson Hall, Room 122), then 
prepares a tentative proposal which includes a list of courses comprising 30 credit 
hours and an essay of 300-500 words explaining one's reasons for desiring to make 
this set of courses the field of specialization. The student's proposal is reviewed 
by a faculty sponsor and submitted to the Multi-Disciplinary Committee for con- 
sideration. After a thorough examination to determine whether the set of courses 
proposed as a multi-disciplinary major is academically sound and coherent, the 
committee will recommend that the Dean of Liberal Arts accept or reject the 
proposal; or it will be sent back to the student and his or her sponsor with sug- 
gestions for modification and resubmission. 

Philosophy and Religion 

Harrelson Hall 

Professor R. S. Bryan, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor W. C. Fitzgerald Jr., Coordinator of Advising and Assistant 
Head of the Department 

Professor: P. A. Bredenberg; Associate Professors: W. R. Carter, W. L. Highfill, R. S. Metzger, 
T. H. Regan. A. D. VanDeVeer: Assoociate Professor Emeritus: J. L. Middleton; Assistant Pro- 
fessors: H. D. Levin, J. H. Moorhead. A. W. Sparer, J. C. VanderKam; Instructors: D. D. Auerbach, 
R. I. Nagel. C. L. Stalnaker 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion at North Carolina State University: 
1) serves the needs of the University at large by providing courses devoted to the 
discussion of the great philosophic ideas of western civilization and of the religious 
notions which have had an impact on all of civilization, and 2) provides an oppor- 
tunity for extensive technical study in philosophy for those students who wish to 
concentrate in this field either for its own sake or as an ideal intellectual foun- 
dation for subsequent graduate or professional study. 

Programs lead to two degrees in philosophy, the Bachelor of Arts and the 
Bachelor of Science. Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy must 
complete 30 hours in philosophy not including the introductory course, Problems 
and Types of Philosophy (PHI 205). These must include either Logic (PHI 201) or 
Symbolic Logic (PHI 335); courses in the development of western philosophic 
thought (PHI 300, 317, 318, and 319); and a seminar (PHI 490). Candidates for the 
Bachelor of Science degree in philosophy must complete 27 hours in philosophy. 
These must include PHI 300, PHI 317, PHI 318, PHI 319, PHI 335, PHI 490 and 
PHI 405, Philosophy of Science. 

Physical Education 

Carmichael Gymnasium 

Professor F. R. Drews, Head of the Department 

Associate Professors: J. B. Edwards Jr., A. M. Hoch, H. Keating, W. R. Leonhardt. W. H. Sonner: 
Assistat}t Professors: A. L. Berle, J. V. Brothers. R. C. Combs. N. E. Cooper. J. M. Daniels, R. G. 
Gwyn, J. W. Isenhour Jr.. M. S. Rhodes. J. L. Shannon, W. M. Shea, E. A. Smaltz; Instructors: 
W. A. Cheek. T. W. Evans, V. M. Leath, R. H. Nicholson, C. E. Patch. T. C. Winslow. G. E. Wall 

North Carolina State University requires from two to four semesters in physical 
education to be taken consecutively during the freshman and sophomore years. The 
specific number of semesters of required physical education is determined for each 
student by the Department of Physical Education. Insofar as faculty, facilities and 
allotment of time permits, each student is guided into courses which will best meet 
individual needs. 



155 



Prescribed Courses — Prescribed courses are designed to meet the specific student 
needs as determined by tests. Prescribed courses are: Health and Physical Fitness, 
Beginning Swimming I, Beginning Swimming II, Restricted Activity I and Re- 
stricted Activity II. The Health and Physical Fitness course is required of all new 
freshmen. The Department of Physical Education also requires a demonstrated 
survival swimming ability or placement in the appropriate beginning swimming 
course. 

Controlled Elective Courses — Elective courses are grouped under one of these 
areas: aquactics, combatives, developmental activities, individual sports and team 
sports. Students are encouraged to develop proficiency in at least two vigorous 
lifetime sports. 

The courses PE 280, Emergency Medical Care and First Aid, and PE 285, Per- 
sonal Health, are offered as electives but do not constitute credit towards meeting 
physical education requirements. 

Political Science 

Tompkins Hall 

Professor W. J. Block, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor K. S. Petersen, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: F. V. Cahill, J. T. Caldwell, A. Holtzman. R. O. Tilman; Associate Professors: J. H. 
Gilbert, H. G. Kebschull, J. P. Mastro, J. M. McClain, K. S. Petersen, M. S. Soroos, J. O. Williams; 
Assistant Professors: B. B. Clary. E. S. Fairchild, J. A. Hurwitz, T. E. Marshall, G. R. Rassel, 
E. R. Rubin, D. W. Stewart. J. E. Swiss; Visiting Instructors: S. H. Kessler. M. L. Vasu 

The Department of Political Science offers basic and advanced courses in all major 
fields of the discipline: American government and politics (local, state and national), 
comparative government and politics, international relations and organizations, 
political theory, public administration and methodology of political science. The 
department provides an area in which students may concentrate their major 
efforts, and it affords opportunities for the study of government and administration 
to students in other curricula and schools. 

Graduate courses in political science are available at N. C. State and at Fort 
Bragg. For graduate degrees see pages 12-13 and consult the Graduate Catalog. 

The department conducts a State Legislative Internship Program in alternate 
years. It also participates in the State Government Internship program, which 
functions under the sponsorship of the Institute of Government at Chapel Hill. 

MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Bachelor of Arts Program — Major requirements are: 30 hours (in addition to 
any political science course which may be taken to satisfy the 12-hour social science 
requirement), 21 of which must be at the 300-level or above; PS 201 or equivalent; 
at least six hours in each of three pairs of deciles (Pair A: American Politics/Policy 
and Administration; Pair B: International or Comparative Politics; Pair C: Poli- 
tical Theory/Scope and Methods) and a Political Science Seminar (indicated by its 
PS course number: any number whose first digit is 4 and whose last digit is 5 or 
higher or any number in the 560's). 

The department recommends that its majors, whenever practicable, take MA 111 
and MA 112 in fulfillment of the School of Liberal Arts mathematics requirement. 

CONCENTRATION IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Bachelor of Science Program — A concentration in political science requires 27 
hours of course work in the discipline, including PS 202, PS 391 and a subsequent 
seminar in political science. 

Criminal Justice (either B.A. or B.S.) — The Departments of Political Science and 
Sociology and Anthropology offer undergraduate majors a concenti-ation in criminal 
justice. This concentration includes 24 semester hours of specialized study. The 
program develops students who may move into middle management and policy 



156 



making positions in agencies such as police, court, correctional, probation and 
parole agencies. 

Students interested in criminal justice should contact Dr. Erika Fairchild, 221 
Tompkins Hall, Political Science, or Dr. Elizabeth Suval, 230 1911 Building, 
Sociology and Anthropology. 

Teacher Education Option — A major in political science may also choose a teacher 
education option. This is a 130-credit hour degree program which includes the 
normal 30-hour major plus the required professional education courses. Successful 
completion of the program leads to certification to teach social studies in the 
secondary schools. 

Sociology and Anthropology 

(Also see Agriculture and Life Sciences) 

1911 Building 

Professor S. C. Mayo, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor E. M. Suval, Assistant Head of the Department 

Professor J. N. Young, Coordinator of Advising 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: L. W. Drabick, C. P. Marsh, G. C. McCann, H. D. Rawls, M. M. Sawhney, J. N. Young; 
Professor Emeritus: C. H. Hamilton; Associate Professors: R. C. Brisson, W. B. Clifford II, A. C. 
Davis, C. V. Mercer, R. L. Moxley, R. D. Mustian, G. S. Nickerson, I. E. Russell, O. Uzzell. R. C. 
Wimberley; Visiting Associate Professor: K. D. Kim; Assistant Professors: W. T. Austin, C. G. 
Dawson, R. S. Ellovich, L. R. Delia Fave, V. A. Hiday, T. M. Hyman, P. T. McFarlane, J. G. 
Peck, L. J. Rhoades, J. O. Shurling, P. L. Tobin, M. L. Walek, J. M. Wallace, M. T. Zingraff; 
Visiting Assistant Professors : H. L. Adkins, J. F. Denny, R. L. Gilmore 

EXTENSION 

Professor: J. N. Collins, In Charge of Community Development 

Professors: J. D. George, M. E. Voland; Professor Emeritus: J. W. Crawford; Associate Professors: 
V. E. Hamilton, T. N. Hobgood Jr., C. E. Lewis, P. P. Thompson; Assistant Professor: C. W. Moody 

This department teaches students the principles and techniques for understanding 
human group behavior. The department seeks: 1) to train students to become 
leaders in organizing groups and communities and in administering programs; 
2) to qualify exceptional students on the undergraduate and graduate levels for 
sociological research, teaching and extension work; 3) to solve problems in human 
group relations through scientific research; and 4) to extend research results to 
the people of the State. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

The following departmental requirements must be met by all students majoring 
in sociology: A minimum of 30 hours in the major field including SOC 202, Prin- 
ciples of Sociology; SOC 301, Human Behavior; SOC 415, Introduction to Sociologi- 
cal Theory; SOC 416, Research Methods; a minimum of five electives, at least two 
at the 400 or higher level in sociology; and SOC 490, Senior Seminar in Sociology. 
The department also requires 15 additional hours of social science including one 
course in psychology; ANT 252, Cultural Anthropology, and an additional ANT 
course are strongly recommended. One course in statistics is also required. 

Social Work — The curriculum prepares students for a professional career in a 
variety of agency and program settings designed to enrich the quality of life for 
persons served and to enable individuals, families, groups and communities to im- 
prove social functioning. The program combines 30-36 hours of classroom and field 
placement instruction which helps students to incorporate and use the values, 
knowledge, methods and techniques of social work practice. Graduates have full 
professional status and may be granted advanced standing in a two-year Master's 



157 



degree program in social work. The curriculum is accredited by the Council on 
Social Work Education. 

Criminal Justice — The criminal justice option seeks to develop a professional 
orientation that will be relevant both to occupational goals and participation as a 
citizen in community affairs. Courses in both political science and sociology are in- 
cluded in a 28-hour block that provides a general background in crime causation and 
agencies of criminal justice plus the opportunity to select from more specific courses 
dealing with deviance, juvenile delinquency, the court system, correctional facili- 
ties, and the like, including field placement in an agency of the criminal justice 
system. 

Social Studies Teacher Education Option — This curriculum prepares the stu- 
dent for state certification in social studies in the secondary school system. The 
inclusion of a professional semester with practice teaching and the need for a 
broad base in the social sciences makes this a comparatively demanding program 
with somewhat less opportunity for free electives. Courses in education and psy- 
chology are taken beginning in the sophomore year in preparation for the teaching 
experience. In addition, the student learns the basic concepts of economics, political 
science, anthropology and history, as well as sociology. 



Speech-Communication 

Tompkins Hall 

Professor W. G. Franklin, Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor T. L. Attaway, Coordinator of Advising 

Professor: C. A. Parker; Associate Professor Emeritus: L. H. Swain; Associate Professors: L. R. 
Camp. H. E. Munn Jr.; Assistant Professor: T. L. Attaway, R. A. Francesconi, R. A. Leonard, 
B. L. Russell; Instructors: J. C. Schnur, G. P. Schumacher, N. H. Snow 

Speech-Communication is conceived as: (1) a humanistic study; (2) a social and 
behavioral science, and (3) a natural science. Characteristically, humanistic study 
of speech and its consequences employs historical, critical, philosophical, esthetic, 
and literal analyses of the intentions, actions, and effects of oral communication. 
Scientifically viewed as a symbolic interaction, speech is an object of empirical 
inquiry in laboratory and field. Conceived as physiological, acoustic, and learned 
behavior, speech-communication receives the rigorous experimental analyses of 
the biological and physical sciences. Such multiple approaches are requisite to 
comprehending the complexity of the speech act. 

MAJOR IN SPEECH-COMMUNICATION 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Program — The major in speech-communication includes 
30 semester hours. The curriculum in speech-communication requires five pre- 
scribed courses in speech. The student may elect courses within the field from 
among offerings in broadcast communication, organizational communication, pub- 
lic communication, speech science communication and theatre communication to 
complete the 30-hour requirement. 



158 



PHYSICAL AND 
MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Cox Hall 

A. C. Menius Jr., Dean 

J. D. Memory, Associate Dean 

The School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences trains potential scientists 
and mathematicians; gives technical support to curricula in North Carolina State's 
other seven schools; and does research in physical sciences and mathematics. These 
activities are carried out by seven academic departments: biochemistry, chemistry, 
computer science, statistics, geosciences, mathematics and physics. The Institute of 
Statistics (Raleigh section) and the Department of Physical Sciences Research are 
also associated with the School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. 

Graduates of the school are recruited for technical and administrative positions 
in industrial research and development laboratories, universities and colleges, non- 
profit research organizations and government agencies. A large percentage of the 
graduates undertake advanced study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. 

The high school student with an above-average performance in mathematics, 
chemistry or physics, and a basic interest in natural phenomena and their mathe- 
matical descriptions, should consider a career in physical sciences or mathematics. 
The school consistently attracts outstanding students; approximately one-third of 
its students graduate with honors or high honors. 

FACILITIES 

Classrooms and school offices in the campus' center are listed under each 
department. In addition, physics research laboratories are located in Daniels Hall 
and the Nuclear Science Building and at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Labora- 
tory in Durham. Biochemistry research is underway in Polk and Withers Halls. 

Special equipment and laboratories include a plasma physics laboratory supported 
by a research tube-making facility; a radio-chemistry laboratory; a one-million 
volt Van de Graaff accelerator; analog and ambilog computers; an IBM 1130 
digital; a laser research laboratory; a Varian Associates HA-100 high resolution 
nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; an upper atmosphere laboratory; a 
biomathematics and biophysics laboratory; undergraduate and graduate desk com- 
puting laboratories; biochemical research and teaching laboratories; and .an ultra- 
violet-infrared-visible spectroscopic laboratory. Other campus facilities for teaching 
and research are electron microscopes, a heterogeneous nuclear reactor designed 
for operation at 100 kilowatts, complete x-ray laboratories with diffraction and 
radiographic equipment, a Beckman Model E analytical ultracentrifuge, precision 
instrument shops, and an IBM 360 Model 40 digital computer connected by tele- 
communication lines to the Model 75 at the Triangle Universities Computation 
Center. N. C. State also participates in the Triangle Universities Nuclear Labora- 
tory which has a 0-35 Mev. cyclo-graaff accelerator. 

CURRICULA 

The school offers undergraduate programs of study leading to the Bachelor of 
Science degree with a major in chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics, 
meteorology, physics or statistics. These curricula have similar freshman years, 
enabling a freshman to change, without loss of time, from one department to 
another in the school. 



159 



SHORT COURSES AND INSTITUTES 

Several short courses and specialized institutes are offered throughout the 
academic year and during the summer months in chemistry, computer science, 
geology, mathematics, physics, and statistics for high school teachers and college 
professors. For information, write the school dean. 

In addition, certain regular courses may be taken for credit through correspond- 
ence or evening classes through the Division of Continuing Education in Raleigh, 
Charlotte or in the Greensboro-Burlington- Winston-Salem area. For information 
write North Carolina State University Division of Continuing Education, Raleigh. 

SUPERIOR STUDENT AND HONOR PROGRAMS 

Exceptional students may be selected to participate in the Superior Student 
Program during their freshman and sophomore years. Enriched courses in chemis- 
try, English, mathematics, and physics have been developed specifically for program 
participants. At the beginning of the junior year, promising students may select 
special courses, participate in undergraduate research, and receive some graduate 
credit toward the Master of Science degree during the senior year. 

Well-prepared students entering the school may seek advanced placement in 
chemistry, history, mathematics, or physics by passing qualifying examinations. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

In addition to University-wide extracurricular activities and honor organizations, 
the School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences has student chapters of the 
following professional and honor organizations: Society of Physics Students, Pi 
Mu Epsilon, the American Chemical Society, and the Association for Computing 
Machinery. 

The Science Council, composed of elected students from the school, sponsors and 
participates in a wide variety of technical and social activities. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Master of Science degree is available with a major in biochemistry, bio- 
mathematics, chemistry, geology, marine sciences, statistics, mathematics, applied 
mathematics and physics. The Master of Biomathematics is offered. The Doctor of 
Philosophy degree is available in biochemistry, biomathematics, chemistry, marine 
sciences, statistics, mathematics, applied mathematics and physics. 



Chemistry 

Dabney Hall and Withers Hall 

Profes8orC. L. Bumgardner, Head of the Department 

Professor R. H. Loeppert, Assistant Professor W. P. Ingram Jr., Assistant Heads 
of the Department 

Professor R. H. Loeppert, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors. H. A. Bent, J. Bordner, L. H. Bowen. M. K. DeArmond, F. W. Getzen, F. C. Hentz Jr. 
(Director of General Chemistry). Z. Z. Hugus Jr., S. G. Levine, G. G. Long, C. G. Moreland. A. F. 
Schreiner (Graduate Administrator), W. P. Tucker. G. H. Wahl Jr., R. C. White; Adjunct Professor: 
M. E. Wall; Professors Emeriti: G. O. Doak, W. J. Peterson. W. A. Reid. P. P. Sutton; Associate 
Professors: H. H. Carmichael, T. C. Caves, A. F. Coots, C. E. Gleit, K. W. Hanck. L. A. Jones, 
M. L. Miles (Director of Organic Laboratories), D. W. Wertz; Associate Professor Emeritus: W. E. 
Jordan; Assistant Professors: Y. Ebisuzaki. W. R Johnston, W. L. Switzer, T. M. Ward; Assistant 
Professor Emeritus: T. J. Blalock; Instructors: E. H. Manning, G. J. Shaw; Instructors Emeriti: 
J. W. Morgan. G. M. Oliver; Teaching and Research Technicians: M. C. Bundy. D. E. Knight; 
Traching Technician and General Laboratory Coordinator: R. L. McClean 

Chemistry is the science dealing with the composition of all substances and 
changes in their composition. Chemists have contributed to the synthetic fiber 

160 



industry, petroleum products and fuels, plastics, the food processing industry, 
nuclear energy, modern drugs and medicine. Today's chemists are concerned with 
the fundamental building blocks of all materials — atoms and molecules — leading to 
improvement of old materials, development of new ones and control of our environ- 
ment. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The chemical industry is the nation's largest manufacturing industry. Chemists 
comprise the largest proportion of scientists in the United States, and future 
demand for chemists should continue to grow. A variety of jobs is open to the 
chemist: biochemistry, metallurgy, space science, oceanography, sales or manage- 
ment, pure research. Chemists are employed in almost every field based on modern 
technology and opportunities in the field of education are many and varied. The 
Bachelor of Science program in chemistry provides an excellent premedical 
curriculum. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

The Bachelor of Science curriculum (shown below), accredited by the American 
Chemical Society, includes a strong, broad background in mathematics, physics 
and the liberal arts. The basic areas of organic, physical, inorganic and analytical 
chemistry are stressed. Laboratory and classroom work develop the skills, 
knowledge and inquiring spirit necessary for a successful career in chemistry. The 
minor field and elective credits allow individual diversity at the junior and senior 
levels. Many undergraduates participate in current departmental research through 
part-time employment or a senior research project. The curriculum prepares the 
student for jobs open to the Bachelor of Science chemist or for advanced graduate 
work. For graduate degrees, see pages 12-13 and consult the Graduate Catalog. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE, CHEMICAL SCIENCES OPTION 

The chemical sciences option is a more flexible program for students who do not 
wish to become professional chemists but who wish to pursue interdisciplinary 
studies with an emphasis on chemistry. This program has less stringent require- 
ments in mathematics, physics and chemistry than does the accredited Bachelor of 
Science program, thus permitting greater latitude in selection of courses from 
other disciplines. A student desiring this option should enroll initially in the 
standard Bachelor of Science curriculum. Near the end of the first year, one may 
transfer to the option after receiving departmental advisory committee approval 
for one's goals and program. 

B.S. CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 106 Laboratory Techniques I 1 CH 108 Laboratory Techniques II 1 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and MA 201 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 4 Calculus II 4 

Social Science 3 PY 201 General Physics* 4 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

English Elective 3 English Elective 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

Calculus III 4 PY 203 General Physics* 4 

PY 202 General Physics* 4 Free Electives 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 18 

161 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis 3 CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry . . 3 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3 CH 433 Physical Chemistry II 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 CH 434 Physical Chemistry II 

FLG 101 Elementary German I 3 Laboratory 2 



Minor" 



Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

FLG 102 Elementary German II 3 

15 Minor 3 

17 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 411 Analytical Chemistry I 4 CH413 Analytical Chemistry II 4 

Chemistry Elective 2 Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 Minor 3 

Mi nor 3 Free Electives 6 

Free Electives 4 — 

— 16 

16 

Hours Required for Graduation 131 



Computer Science 

Dabney Hall 

Professor D. C. Martin, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor T. L. Honeycutt, Associate Department Head and Coordinator 
of Advising 

Professors: W. Chou. P. E. Lewis, D. A. Link, L. B. Martin; Associate Professors: D. R. Deuel, 
R. J. Fornaro, D. F. McAllister, J. D. Powell, W. E. Robbins, A L. Tharp; Adjunct Associate 
Professor: L. H. Williams; Assistant Professors: S. D. Danielopoulos, L. E. Deimel Jr., J. W. 
Hanson, M. J. Lee, K. Tai, N. F. Williamson; Instructors: M. R. Austin, A. B. Finger; Visiting 
Instructor: J. Hatch; Special Lecturer: F. W. Houghtaling 

The discipline of computer science has developed during the past 25 years as a 
direct consequence of rapid growth of the electronic computer. This technological 
development has great impact on man and the way he lives. Almost all areas of 
industry, the military establishment, government agencies, education and business 
use computers and new applications continue to arise. Computers are used to help 
make and operate our automobiles, airplanes and space ships; to help design our 
highways, bridges and buildings; to handle banking transactions and to assist 
in management decisions; to analyze farm production; as a research tool for the 
scientist; to monitor manufacturing processes, utilities and communication; and to 
provide a multitude of other services. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

A wide range of jobs exist for computer scientists since computers have diverse 
applications. Salaries are good for both men and women. There is a need for basic 
research into the principles of computer system design and the analysis of computa- 
tional algorithms and students may choose to continue their training with graduate 
study. 



* The sequence PY 205. 208, 407 may be substituted for PY 201, 202, 203, with approval of the 

adviser. 
"* The minor may be in any field closely related to chemistry, such as mathematics, physics, computer 
science, geoscience, statistics, biological sciences, engineering or science education. A total of four 
courses in two such areas may constitute a "split" minor. The minor field should be chosen in 
consultation with the faculty adviser prior to or during the junior year. 



162 



CURRICULUM 

This undergraduate curriculum leads to a degree of Bachelor of Science in com- 
puter science. Core courses provide foundations in programming and computer 
languages, the structure of data, computer architecture, solution methods including 
numerical analysis and simulation, and the theory of computation. The restricted 
electives chosen in consultation with one's adviser during the junior year allow 
exploration of specific computer science areas or fields such as information science, 
operating systems, computer architecture, and analysis of algorithms. One may 
study fields in which there are significant computer applications like management, 
physical, biological and social sciences, numerical analysis and statistics. 

Students in other departments may select courses in computer science as elec- 
tives to broaden their programs of study and to learn how to use the computer for 
solving problems. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE CURRICULUM 



Fall Semester 



CSC 101 Introduction to Programming .... 3 
MA 102 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

Basic Science 3 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 
3 CSC 102 Programming Concepts 3 



MA 201 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Basic Science 3 

Physical Education 1 



14 



14 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CSC 112 Basic Computer Organization 

and Assembly Language 3 

MA 405 Introduction to Matrices and 

Linear Transformations 3 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Literature 3 

Physical Education 1 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 311 Data Structures 3 

MA 312 Introduction to Differential 

Equations 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CSC 302 Introduction to Numerical 

Methods 3 

CSC 322 Applied Algebraic Structures 3 

ST 371 Introduction to Probability and 

Distribution Theory 2 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Restrictive Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 312 Computer Organization and 

Logic 3 

CSC 412 Introduction to Computability 

Language and Automata 3 

ST 372 Introduction to Statistical 

Inference and Regression 2 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



17 



Fall Semester 

CSC 411 Introduction to Simulation 3 



Restricted Elective 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Free Elective 3 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Restricted Elective 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Free Elective 3 



15 



16 



Hours Required for Graduation 126 



163 



Geosciences 

Withers Hall 

Professor C. J. Leith, Head of the Department and Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: H. S. Brown, E. G. Droessler, W. J. Saucier; Professors Emeriti: J. M. Parker III, J. L. 
Stuckey: Associate Professors: S. P. S. Arya, V. V. Cavaroc Jr.. C. D. Harrington, G. S. Janowitz, 
C. E. Knowles. L. J. Pietrafesa. A. H. Weber. C. W. Welby: Adjunct Associate Professors: F. S. 
Binkowski, J. T. Peterson, J. R. Smith, W. H. Spence; Associate Professor Emeritus: E. L. Miller 
Jr.: Assistant Professors: M. J. Aldrich, E. F. Stoddard, T. L. Tsui. G. F. Watson, R. H. Weisberg, 
I. J. Won; Adjunct Assistant Professors: W. D. Bach Jr.. J. K. Ching, R. E. Eskeridge; Instructors: 
T. B. Curtin, D. T. Long 

The geosciences include the overlapping divisions of the physical, chemical and 
biological earth sciences, such as geology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, 
meteorology, oceanography and paleontology. The Department of Geosciences offers 
courses in these disciplines and awards the B.A. and B.S. degrees in geology and 
the B.S. degree in meteorology. Degree programs in oceanography are at the 
graduate level only. (For graduate degrees offered see pages 12-13 and consult the 
Graduate Catalog.) 

Geology is the professional field in which geological knowledge and techniques 
are focused on the solution of problems concerned with the environment, with the 
occurrence, origin, distribution and behavior of rocks, with mineral deposits, with 
raw material supplies and with a variety of engineering projects. Many engineering 
undertakings — siting and construction of dams and reservoirs, tunnels, buildings 
and highways — depend on geological setting knowledge. Discovery, evaluation, 
development and conservation of mineral resources (including fossil fuels and 
ground water) and the disposal of liquid and solid wastes require quantitative and 
analytical application of geologic principles. 

Meteorology is the science of the atmosphere, including the processes and the 
phenomena within the atmosphere, the interactions with earth's land and sea 
surface below and with the solar atmosphere above. Its objectives are to apply 
understanding of the atmosphere and the processes within to benefit mankind in 
his welfare and endeavors. The meteorology curriculum provides basic training for 
roles in both theory and application. The student is prepared for research or pro- 
fessional applications. 

No activity on earth is unaffected by the natural conditions and processes of our 
atmospheric environment. A familiar purpose of meteorology is to provide weather 
forecasts so man may protect himself intelligently from damages by weather and 
plan beneficially his individual activities for the immediate future. In addition to 
weather information reports to the public, meteorology reaches into broader aspects 
of environmental technology. Increasing concern about "environmental quality," 
in relation to operations and welfare, and to the impacts on air quality by commerce 
and industry have led to expanded concepts of atmospheric monitoring and the need 
for research and services applied to industrial operations, environmental planning 
and government regulation. Among meteorology fields are atmospheric pollution, 
weather modification and control, and interrelations with agriculture, industry 
and marine science. 

The oceans are the subject of major research programs worldwide. The Depart- 
ment of Geosciences offers undergraduate and graduate courses in geological, 
meteorological and physical oceanography. 

Remote sensing imagery provides a new dimension to geosciences. These data 
are utilized for teaching and research. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Geologists are employed by oil companies, quarrying concerns, exploration com- 
panies, construction firms, railroads, public utilities, banks and insurance com- 
panies; iron, steel and other metal producers, manufacturers using nonmetallic 
raw materials such as ceramics, cement and abrasives; municipal, state and federal 
government agencies, schools, colleges, museums and research institutes. There is 
a growing need for the application of geological science to engineering construction 

164 



in connection with highways, foundations, excavations, beach erosion control and 
water supply problems. The mineral industry of the Southeast has expanded sub- 
stantially in the last decade. 

Basic meteorological services are provided by federal government agencies, pri- 
marily the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and components of 
the Department of Defense; these agencies are the principal employers of meteorol- 
ogists. This work may involve atmospheric sensing and measurement, including the 
use of meteorological satellites and space probes; data analysis and computation; 
weather forecasting, and guidance services to aeronautics, agriculture, forestry, 
hydrology, and recreation and public health. Meteorologists are used in environ- 
mental planning and regulation at the state and local levels. Power generating and 
fuel transmission industries, engineering firms, weather consulting firms, insurance 
companies, major retailing businesses, and schools and colleges and research insti- 
tutions are employing meteorologists because of recognition of the involvement of 
the atmosphere on their activities. 

GEOSCIENCES CURRICULUM 

LEADING TO B.A. DEGREE IN GEOLOGY 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 122 Analytic Geom. and Cal. I 4 MA 212 Analytic Geom. and Cal. II 3 

Social Science- Humanities* 3 GY 222 Historical Geology 3 

GY 101 General Physical Geology 3 Social Sciences- Humanities* 3 

GY 110 Physical Geology Laboratory 1 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 — 

— 13 
15 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry 4 CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

Social Science- Humanities* 3 Social Science-Humanities* 3 

GY 330 Crystallography & Mineralogy 3 GY 331 Optical Micros. & X-ray Diff 4 

Elective 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 Elective i3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 -*- 

— 15 
17 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

PY 211 General Physics 4 GY 351 Structural Geology 3 

Social Sciences-Humanities* 3 Social Science-Humanities* 3 

GY 440 Igneous and Met. Petrology 4 GY 452 Sedimentary Petrology 4 

ST 311 Intro, to Statistics 3 PY 212 General Physics II 4 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers & Elective 3 

Their Uses 3 — 

— 17 
17 

SUMMER SESSION 
GY 465 Geological Field Camp (OPTIONAL) 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

GY 462 Field Geology*** 3 Geology Elective** 3 

Social Science- Humanities* 3 Electives 6 

Electives 3 Social Science-Humanities* 6 

Geology Elective** 3 — 

ENG 321 The Comm. of Tech. Info 3 15 

15 Hours Required for Graduation 124 



* Social Science- Humanities requirements shall contain courses in at least three Humanities (Fine 
Arts, History, Literature, Language. Philosophy, Religion) and three Social Sciences (Anthropol- 
ogy. Economics, Political Science. Psychology, Sociology). 
** Geology electives must include either Paleontology or Mineral Exploration and Evaluation. 
*** GY 465 Geological Field Camp (or equivalent field camp) may be substituted for GY 462. 

165 



GEOSCIENCES CURRICULUM 

LEADING TO B.S. DEGREE IN METEOROLOGY 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 4 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Physical Education 1 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 105 1 Chemistry — Principles & 

Applications 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 1 



15 



Fall Semester 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 



MA 202 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Communicative Arts* 3 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Physical Education 1 



15 



Credits 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

Geophysical Sciences Elective** 3 

Communicative Arts* 3 

Technical Elective A*** 3 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Physical Education 1 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



16 



Credits 



MY 411 Introductory Meteorology 3 

MY 421 Atmospheric Statics & 

Thermodynamics 3 

ST 371 Introduction to Probability 

and Statistics 4 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Free Elective 3 



16 



Spring Semester 

MY 422 Atmospheric Kinematics & 

Dynamics 3 

MY 435 Measurements and Data Systems . . 3 

Technical Elective A*** 3 

Technical Elective B**** 3 

Free Elective 3 



15 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 
MY 441 Meteorology Analysis I 3 MY 412 Atmospheric Physics 3 



MY 443 Meteorological Laboratory I 4 

Technical Elective B**** 3 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Free Elective 3 



MY 444 Meteorological Laboratory II 4 

Technical Elective B**** 3 

Technical Elective A*** 3 

Free Elective 3 



16 16 

Hours Required for Graduation 124 



Students who intend to take additional chemistry courses, or who plan technical electives which 
require additional chemistry, should add CH 104 or replace CH 105 with CH 103 or CH 107. 
Advanced transfer students are permitted to substitute mathematics, science, or engineering 
credits for CH 105. 

' Modern language or speech and technical writing. 

1 Geophysical science elective is selected from among GY 101, GY 120, MAS 200, PY 223, SSC 
200, CE 201 or 370, FOR 272. 

' Technical elective A includes courses in the sciences, agriculture, and engineering, chosen from 
lists approved by the major department and school, but excluding more than one advanced course 
in meteorology. It must include at least one course in computer programming. 

' Technical elective B constitutes a minor field of emphasis, consisting of at least eight credits in 
that subject. Among those available, but not limited to them, are: chemistry, computer science, 
geology (physical geology, geophysics), mathematics (to include MA 511), physics (senior 
courses), statistics (to include a 500-level course), chemical engineering (heat transfer, fluid 
mechanics, air pollution), civil engineering (hydrology, sanitation, geodetics), electrical engi- 
neering (field theory, wave propagation, instrumentation), engineering science and mechanics 
(fluid mechanics), mechanical -aerospace engineering (heat transfer, fluid mechanics), forestry 
(protection, mensuration, management), health science (significantly involving atmospheric 
environment), marine science (upper division and graduate), plant science (significantly in- 
volving atmospheric environment), soil science (to include SSC 511). 



166 



Mathematics 

Harrelson Hall 

Professor N. J. Rose, Head of the Department 

Professor H. V. Park, Associate Head of the Department 

Professor W. J. Harrington, Assistant Head of the Department and Coordinator of 
Advising 

Professors: J. W. Bishir, E. E. Burniston. R. E. Chandler, J. M. A. Danby. R. O. Fulp, W. J. Harring- 
ton, K. Koh, J. R. Kolb, J. Levine. P. E. Lewis, J. Luh, R. H. Martin Jr., P. A. Nickel. H. Sagan, 
H. E. Speece, R. A. Struble, H. R van der Vaart, O. Wealer; Associate Professors: S. L. Campbell, 
H. C. Cooke, W. G. Dotson Jr., J. C. Dunn, R. Cellar. R. E. Hartwig, J. E. Huneycutt Jr., D. M. 
Latch, C. H. Little Jr.. A. Maltbie, J. A. Martin, C. D. Meyer Jr.. A. R. Nolstad, L. B. Page, 

C. V. Pao, D. M. Peterson, H. A. Petrea, J. A. Roulier, E. L. Stitzinger. W. M. Waters. J. B. Wilson; 
Assistant Professors: C. N. Anderson, H. J. Charlton, L. O. Chung, J. E. Franke, M. L. Gardner. 

D. E. Garoutte, D. J. Hansen, T. Lada. C. F. Lewis, J. Nelson. S. O. Paur, M. S. Putcha. R. T. 
Ramsay, R. G. Savage. S. Schecter, J. F. Selgrade, R. Silber. J. L. Sox Jr.. D. F. Ullrich. R. E. 
White; Instructors: D. L. Brant, H. L. Crouch Jr.. H. L. Davison, T. F. Gordon 

The undergraduate major in mathematics provides a core of basic mathematics 
courses with a program of electives sufficiently flexible to prepare a student for 
graduate study in pure or applied mathematics (for graduate degrees, see pages 
12-13), for careers in industry, business or government, or for teaching. A carefully 
selected set of required courses and electives in science, humanities and modern 
language provides a program well adapted to the demands of modern day life. 

Students with a special interest may take the applied mathematics option. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS 

Required Mathematics Courses (30 credits) 

MA 102-201-202 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I, II, III 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathematics with Applications 

MA 312 Introduction to Differential Equations 

MA 403M Introduction to Modern Algebra 

MA 405M Introduction to Linear Algebra and Matrices 

MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I 

MA 426 Mathematical Analysis II or MA 512 Advanced Calculus II 
Mathematics Electives (12 credits) 

Twelve (12) credits of Mathematics courses at 400-500 levels. 
Science and Mathematics-related Requirements (17-19 credits) 

CH 101 

CSC 101 or CSC 111 

MA 421 or ST 371-372 

PY 205-208 (or PY 201-202) 
Science and Math-related Electives (12 credits)* 

(1) At least 6 additional credits of physical science, engineering science, or life science (6-12 credits) 

(2) Additional courses in Computer Science and/or Statistics (0-6 credits) 
Required Humanities (15 credits) 

English 111, 112 

English or American Literature — one semester 

Introductory History — one semester 

Foreign Language — completion of the intermediate course no. 201 
Humanities/Social Sciences Electives (18 credits) 

At least six (6) of the eighteen credits must be at the 300 or 400 level. 
Physical Education (4 credits) 
Free Electives (16-18 credits) 

Hours Required for Graduation 126 



* These elective courses require the approval of the student's advisor. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR APPLIED MATHEMATICS OPTION 

Required Mathematics Courses (33 credits) 

MA 102-201-202 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I. II, III 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathematics with Applications 

MA 312 Introduction to Differential Equations 

MA 403M Introduction to Modern Algebra 

MA 405M Introduction to Linear Algebra and Matrices 

MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I 

MA 426 Mathematical Analysis II or MA 512 Advanced I i ulus II 



167 



MA 430 Introduction to Applied Mathematics 
Mathematics Electives (6 credits) 

Six (6) credits of Mathematics courses at 400-500 levels. 
Science and Mathematics-related requirements (17-19 credits) 

CH 101 

CSC 101 or CSC 111 

MA 421 or ST 371-372 

PY 205-208 (or PY 201-202) 
Applied/Career-oriented electives (15 credits) 

(1) Twelve (12) credits* (in depth) in one Math- related or career-oriented area; 

(2) Three (3) additional credits in science. (This may be replaced by a 400-500 Math elective if the 
12 credits in (1) are all in science.) 

Required Humanities (15 credits) 

English 111, 112 

English or American Literature — one semester 

Introductory History — one semester 

Foreign Language— completion of the intermediate course no. 201 
Humanities/Social Sciences Electives (18 credits) 

At least six (6) of the eighteen credits must be at the 300 or 400 level. 
Physical Education (4 credits) 
Free Electives (16-18 credits) 

Hours Required for Graduation 126 



* These elective courses require the approval of student's advisor. 

SAMPLE PROGRAM IN Mathematics 

(Includes the Applied Mathematics Option) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 102M Analytic Geometry and MA 201M Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 4 Calculus II 4 

CH 101 Genera] Chemistry I 4 MA 114 Introd. to Finite Mathematics 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 with Applications 3 

Introductory History 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Physical Education 1 Science Elective 3-4 

— CSC 101 Intro, to Programming 3 

15 Physical Education 1 



17-18 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 202M Analytic Geometry and MA 312 Introd. to Differential 

Calculus III 4 Equations 3 

PY 205 General Physics 4 MA 403M Intro, to Modern Algebra 3 

English or American Literature 3 PY 208 General Physics 4 

Foreign Language 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Science/Math -related Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

18 17 
JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 405M Introd. to Linear Algebra MA 421 Introd. to Probability 3 

and Matrices 3 MA 426 Mathematical Analysis II 3 

MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I 3 Science/Math-related Elective 3 

Science/Math-related Elective 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

— 15 

15 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Mathematics Elective 3 Mathematics Elective* 3 

Mathematics Elective 3 Mathematics Elective 3 

Humanities/Social Sciences Electives 6 Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Electives 6 

15 15 

Hours Required for Graduation 126 



* Replace by MA 430 for the Applied Mathematics Option. 
168 



Physics 

Cox Hall 

Professor A. W. Jenkins Jr., Head of the Department 

Professor R. R. Patty, Associate Head of the Department and Coordinator of 
Advising 

Professors: W. R. Davis. W. O. Doggett, G. L. Hall. G. H. Katzin. E. R. Manring, J. D. Memory, A. C. 
Menius Jr., G. E. Mitchell. M. K. Moss, J. Y. Park, L. W. Seagondollar, D. R. Tilley. A. W. 
Waltner; Professors Emeriti: W. H. Bennett. F. W. Lancaster. J. T. Lynn. L. H. Thomas; Associate 
Professors: K. T. Chung, G. C. Cobb, C. R. Gould, C. E. Johnson. Fred Lado. D. H. Martin. G. W. 
Parker, J. F. Schetzina; Assistant Professors: D. G. Haase. Jim Km. J. R. Mowat. H. L. Owen. 
J. S. Risley, D. E. Sayers; Associate Members of the Department: J. M. A. Danby (Mathematics), 
R. E. Fornes (Textiles), R. L. Murray (Nuclear Engineering), D. L. Ridgeway (Statistics) 

Physics is the fundamental science of observation, measurement and the mathe- 
matical description of the particles and processes of nature. In addition to extending 
our basic knowledge of the universe, physics provides the means for attacking 
problems of importance in modern technology. The variety of the contributions made 
by physicists is indicated by activities such as the discovery of new basic particles 
of nature, the invention and use of new instruments to probe interplanetary space, 
the study of processes fundamental to the release of thermonuclear energy, the 
development of lasers and solid state devices, the research on the structure and 
interaction of nuclei, atoms, molecules and ions. 

PROGRAMS 

The Physics Department offers a program of study at the undergraduate level 
which provides the student with a strong fundamental background and with course 
options allowing deeper study of selected areas of particular individual interest. At 
the graduate level, a comprehensive fundamental preparation is followed by speciali- 
zation and research in one of the following areas: atmospheric, atomic, nuclear, 
nuclear magnetic resonance, plasma, relativity and solid state physics. (See pages 
12-13 for graduate degrees and consult the Graduate Catalog.) 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The undergraduate curriculum in physics provides the basic training for a career 
in physics or for graduate study. The curriculum leads to a Bachelor of Science in 
Physics. 

PHYSICS CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Crtdxt* 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 PY 201 General Physics 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 MA 201 Analytic Geometry & 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II 4 

Calculus I 4 CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

15 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semixtir Credits 

PY 202 General Physics 4 PY 203 General Physics 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & PY 413 Thermal Physics 8 

Calculus III 4 MA 301 Applied Differentia] Equations 1 8 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

English Elective 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 — 

— 17 

18 



169 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



PY 411 Mechanics I 3 

PY 414 Electricity & Magnetism I 3 

PY 451 Intermediate Experiments 

in Physics I 2 

MA 401 Applied Differential Equations II . 3 

Free Elective 3 



PY 412 Mechanics II 3 

PY 415 Electricity & Magnetism II 3 

PY 452 Intermediate Experiments in 

Physics II 2 

Mathematics Elective 3 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Free Elective 3 



IT 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 

PY 401 Modern & Quantum Physics I 3 

Technical Elective* 3 

Mathematics Elective 3 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Free Elective 3 



IS 



Spring Semester Credits 

PY 402 Modern & Quantum Physics II ... 3 

Technical Electives* 6 

Humanities-Social Sciences 3 

Free Electives 3 



15 



Hours Required for Graduation 127 



Technical or Sciences Electives (above 200 level) 



Statistics 

Cox Hall 

Professor D. D. Mason, Head of the Department 

Professor F. E. McVay, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: B. B. Bhattacharyya, C. C. Cockerham, H. J. Gold, M. M. Goodman, A. H. E. Grandage. 
R. J. Hader, W. L. Hafley, D. W. Hayne, H. L. Lucas. R. J. Monroe, L. A. Nelson, C. H. Proctor, 

C. P. Quesenberry, J. O. Rawlings, D. L. Ridgeway, J. A. Rigney, R. G. D. Steel, H. R. van der 
Vaart, O. Wesler; Adjunct Professor: J. T. Wakeley; Professor Emeritus: G. M. Cox: Associate 
Professors: A. R. Gallant, T. M. Gerig, F. G. Giesbrecht, Thomas Johnson, A. C. Linnerud, A. R. 
Manson, J. L. Wasik; Visiting Associate Professor: B. S. Weir; Adjunct Associate Professors: 

D. L. Bayless, J. R. Chromy; Assistant Professors: D. A. Dickey, B. J. Stines; Visiting Assistant 
Professor: D. J. Drummond; Adjunct Assistant Professors: A. J. Barr, J. H. Goodnight, H. T. 
Schreuder; Visiting Instructor: John Warren; Senior Research Technologist: F. J. Verlinden; 
Associate Statistician: H. K. Hamann; Assisatnt Statisticians: P. H. Geissler. H. J. Kirk, D. W. 
Turner, F. T. Wang 

Statistics is the body of scientific methodology which deals with the logic of 
experiment and survey design, the efficient collection and presentation of quantita- 
tive information, and the formulation of valid and reliable inferences from sample 
data. 

The Department of Statistics is part of the Institute of Statistics, which includes 
Departments of Biostatistics and Statistics at Chapel Hill. The Department of 
Statistics provides instruction, consultation and computational services on research 
projects for other departments of all schools at North Carolina State University 
including the Agricultural Experiment Station. Department staff are engaged in 
research in statistical theory and methodology. This range of activities furnishes 
a professional environment for training students in the use of statistical procedures 
in such fields as the physical, biological and social sciences, and in industrial 
research and development. 

The undergraduate program leads to a bachelor of science in statistics. For 
graduate degrees see pages 12-13 and consult the Graduate Catalog. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The importance of sound statistical thinking in the design and analysis of quan- 
titative studies is generally recognized. Industry relies on statistical methods to 
control the quality of goods in the process of manufacture and to determine the 
acceptability of goods produced. Statistical procedures based on scientific sampling 
have become basic tools in such diverse fields as weather forecasting, opinion 



170 



polling, crop and livestock estimation, and business trend prediction. Because one 
can improve the efficiency of use of increasingly complex and expensive experi- 
mental and survey data, the statistician is in demand wherever quantitative studies 
are conducted. 

TYPICAL STATISTICS CURRICULUM 



Fall Semester 



ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 4 

CSC 101 Introduction to Programming .... 3 

Physical Education 1 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 
ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 



CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Physical Education 1 



IS 



16 



Fall Semester 

ST 371 Intro, to Probability and 

Distribution Theory 2 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

EB 201 Economics I 3 

Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ST 372 Intro, to Statistical Inference 

and Regression 2 

MA 405 Introduction to Linear 

Algebra and Matrices 3 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

EB 202 Economics II 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



16 



Fall Semester 
ST 421 



Introduction to Mathematical 

Statistics 3 

Major Elective 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 

Biological Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ST 422 Introduction to Mathematical 

Statistics 3 

Major Elective 6 

Foreign Language 3 

Free Elective 3 



16 



18 



Fall Semester 

ST 501 Basic Statistical Analysis 3 

Major Elective 3 

ENG 321 Communication of Technical 

Information 3 

Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



15 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ST 502 Basic Statistical Analysis 3 

Major Elective 3 



SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



16 



Hours Required for Graduation 127 



171 




Research in the textile chemistry laboratory is constantly monitored. 



172 



TEXTILES 

Nelson Textile Building and David Clark Laboratories 

D. W. Chaney, Dean 

D. S. Hamby, Associate Dean, Textiles Extension and Continuing Education; M. R. 
Shaw, Assistant Dean, Textiles Research; P. D. Emerson, Head, Textile Machine 
Design and Development; W. E. Smith, Assistant to the Dean, Student Services; 
E. E. Hutchison, Academic Coordinator; G. Rodeffer, Librarian, Burlington 
Textiles Library 

The field of textiles is broad. It covers almost every aspect of our daily lives — 
with applications in medicine, space, recreation and sports, personal safety, environ- 
mental improvement and control, transportation and in household and apparel uses. 
These versatile materials — textiles — are made to exacting design specifications by 
a variety of modern high-speed processes, utilizing tools such as lasers, electronics 
and computers. Textiles begins with the synthesis of fibers by man or by nature; 
it carries through a myriad selection of processes for fabric formation, including 
the steps necessary to make fabrics useful, such as the manufacture of dyestuffs 
and coloring, chemical auxiliaries and finishes, cutting and fashioning into end-use 
products. 

The approximately 5,000 graduates of the School of Textiles hold diverse posi- 
tions, mostly in North Carolina. In the textile and related industries, occupations 
range from manufacturing management, sales, corporate management, designing 
and styling, research development and technical service to quality control and per- 
sonnel management. These textile graduates are in the creative and management 
decision-making aspects of the industry. They plan the flow of materials and 
machines. They create new products and processes. They solve product and process 
problems. They create styles, designs, patterns, colors, textures, and structures 
for apparel, home and industrial uses. They engineer the systems and products 
required of industrial, space, medical, apparel and other uses of textile products. 
They deal with computers, automation, product quality, plant performance and 
environmental problems. They manage large and small companies, personnel, and 
systems. 

The School of Textiles prepares young people for careers in the above occupations. 
A broad background is stressed; two-thirds of the educational program can come 
from the resources of the University outside the School. Opportunities remain 
excellent, with the School maintaining one of the University's best placement 
records. Demand for textile graduates from North Carolina State University is 
particularly strong, due in part to the strength of the academic programs. These 
programs are organized in two departments: textile technology and textile 
chemistry. 

CURRICULA 

The School of Textiles offers a broad choice of curricula depending upon individual 
interests. Terminal Bachelor of Science programs in textile technology or in textile 
chemistry permit a broad choice of courses in addition to required core courses. 
For example, a student may specialize in yarn or fabric structures, in textile 
economics and marketing or in fabric styling and design. The student's curriculum 
includes humanities, social sciences and basic sciences and may result in a con- 
centration in business economics, industrial engineering, languages, mathematics, 
physics, chemistry, political science, statistics or textile chemistry (or technology). 
The structure of the course sequence may allow graduate study in either the field of 
concentration or in textile chemistry or technology. It is possible, with one summer 
of extra work, to obtain a double degree, for example in textile technology and 
chemistry. 

Curricula leading to graduate study, particularly to Doctor of Philosophy pro- 
grams, such as in fiber and polymer science, differ from terminal Bachelor of 
Science programs primarily in the junior and senior year. While considerable 

173 



latitude is still possible, there are a number of prescribed courses, the nature of 
which depends upon the type of graduate study anticipated. 

Textile chemistry gives the student fundamental education in chemistry em- 
phasizing the application of this science to textiles. Emphasis on chemical funda- 
mentals adequately prepares exceptional textile chemistry students for graduate 
study either in pure or applied chemistry. Similarly, students who complete the 
program in any of the concentrations in textile technology with a high degree of 
excellence may do graduate study in numerous areas. 

Inasmuch as professional textiles work is concentrated in the last two years of 
the student's program, it is possible for students from junior or community colleges, 
or other institutions of higher learning, to transfer to the School of Textiles with a 
minimum loss of time. 

INSPECTION TRIPS 

For certain textile courses, it is desirable for the student to see the manufacturing 
process under actual operating conditions. When possible, student groups visit 
outstanding manufacturing plants. Trip participation is required; transportation 
costs and other travel expenses, while held to a minimum, are paid by the student. 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 

Job opportunities for summer employment are available for textile students. 
Placement assistance is available through the school placement office and frequently 
can be arranged in the student's home community. Qualified students may arrange 
to receive academic credit of up to three hours per summer not to exceed six hours 
for faculty-approved summer jobs. 

DEGREES 

Upon completion of programs in either textile technology or textile chemistry, 
the degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred. 

The School of Textiles offers the following graduate degrees: Master of Textile 
Technology; Master of Science in textile technology or in textile chemistry; and 
Doctor of Philosophy in fiber and polymer science. For general requirements consult 
the Graduate Catalog. 

By faculty agreement candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in other 
schools of this institution may specialize in essentially textile-related subjects. In 
such cases, research is usually done in textiles. 

THE FOUR-ONE PROGRAM 

The School of Textiles has a program which permits a student with a bacca- 
laureate degree from an accredited college or university to complete the require- 
ments for a Bachelor of Science degree in textile technology or textile chemistry 
after the satisfactory completion of one year of study. 

Applicants should have completed mathematics, physics and chemistry com- 
parable to that required in the basic textile technology or chemistry curricula. 
Under these conditions, the student can complete the degree requirements in two 
regular semesters and summer school. Students not meeting minimum require- 
ments in sciences or applied mathematics could remove deficiencies in the summer 
session prior to the fall semester, allowing completion of studies at the end of the 
normal period or in the following summer sessions. 

Each applicant's undergraduate program is considered individually and, in 
general, a complete transfer of credits is possible. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

This program offers the exceptional student an opportunity to penetrate deeply 
into an area of special interest with exposure to various forms of research or 
independent study. Academically-promising entrants to the School, and students 
who develop academic promise during the freshman year, are assigned to honors 
advisers and are regarded as honors candidates. Special lectures, discussion groups 

174 



and seminars in the freshman and sophomore years introduce and reveal the 
possibilities for future development in the honors program. Towards the end of 
the freshman year, selected honors candidates are invited to become full members 
of the honors program. In the sophomore year, with honors adviser consent, honors 
students may begin to develop programs of strength in a special interest area. This 
may necessitate the substitution of preferred courses for those normally required. 
In the junior and senior years the student develops special interests, culminating 
in an honors thesis. The honors thesis ranges from a scholarly review of a special 
topic to a discussion of an experimental research problem. 

FACILITIES 

The Nelson Textile Building and David Clark Laboratories house one of the 
most modern, best-equipped textile institutions. Included is the Burlington Textiles 
Library, a division of the D. H. Hill Library and one of the country's most complete 
textile libraries. 

SPECIAL SERVICES 

The School of Textiles offers a number of services and programs which enriches 
its academic programs. 

Textile Research is conducted on a wide variety of problems including some 
concerns of society with the environment and with health and safety. Frequently 
the problems are interdisciplinary and involve team effort. Students have an oppor- 
tunity to participate in the solution to current problems. 

Textiles Extension and Continuing Education is vigorously engaged in by all 
faculty. It serves the needs of the textile industry by disseminating research find- 
ings and offering short courses for executive, scientific and supervisory personnel. 
The two-way exchange in these activities keeps students and faculty informed on all 
of the latest developments. 

Machine Design and Development including well equipped shops, provides engi- 
neering assistance to the faculty and students. This department endeavors to remain 
current with recent engineering advances applicable to textiles and maintains 
active liaison with industry and the scientific community. 

The Office of Student Services is responsible for the placement and financial 
aid programs of the School of Textiles. The placement function makes available 
to a potential employer the credentials of our students for permanent and summer 
employment and in a great number of cases performs equally for alumni. 

The financial aid function operates by committee and makes it possible for any 
North Carolina student to pursue an education in textiles through scholarships, 
loans or grants as long as one maintains the University's academic and moral 
standards. 



Textile Chemistry 

David Clark Laboratories 

Professor W. M. Whaley, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor C. D. Livengood, Coordinator of Advising 

Professor*: K. S. Campbell, D. M. Gates. J. A. Cuculu, R. D. Gilbert. G. Gold finger. R. McGregor: 
Professor Emeritus: R. W. Work; Adjunct Professors: A. E. Davis Jr.. H. F. Mark. A. Schindler. 
A. M. Sookne; Associate Professors: T. H. Guion. M. H. Theil. W. K. Walsh; Adjunct Associate 
Professors: H. N. Friedlander. K. K. Ghosh, T. Murayama; Assistant Professor: G. N. Mock: 
Adjunct Assistant Professors: L. A. Graham. W. R. Martin Jr. 

The field of textile chemistry embraces a number of disciplines and is concerned, 
in part, with those industrial processes that constitute the final steps in the 
preparation of textile materials for the consumer. Common terms applied to these 
processes are scouring, bleaching, printing, dyeing and finishing. Textile chemistry 
is also concerned with fiber-forming polymers, both natural and man-made, and how 
the chemical and physical properties of such materials vary with fiber structure. 

175 



Students receive a fundamental knowledge of the underlying principles that relate 
to this derivative field and a perspective that includes the many interacting factors 
involved in the preparation and conversion of polymeric materials to useful 
products. 

FACILITIES 

David Clark Laboratories houses offices, classrooms, laboratories and pilot 
facilities for instruction and research. The departmental radiation laboratory is 
in Nelson Building. Radiation facilities include a Cobalt 60 source and a 500 KV 
Electron Accelerator. 

Equipment is available for ultra-violet, visible, infrared, nmr and esr spectro- 
scopy, reflectometry, colorimetry, viscometry, chromotography, differential thermal 
analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, instru- 
mental measurement of color and computer color matching. Common testing equip- 
ment used for the evaluation of the physical properties of textile materials and 
for determining the color-fastness, wash-fastness, etc., of fibers and fabrics is also 
available. Complete pilot plant facilities allow demonstration of wet-processing 
operations used in textiles. 

CURRICULA 

The department has three undergraduate curricula: (a) Dyeing and Finishing 
Operations, (b) Dyeing and Finishing Science, and (c) Polymer Chemistry. The 
first concentration is primarily for students who wish a terminal Bachelor of 
Science degree, whereas the other concentrations are oriented toward advanced 
studies. However, the student taking Dyeing and Finishing Operations can use 
elective courses to achieve a background suitable for graduate studies if he wishes 
to do so. 

For graduate degrees see pages 12-13 and consult the Graduate Catalog. 

CURRICULUM IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

Dyeing and Finishing Science Concentration 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

T 101H Fundament, of Text 2 T 203 Fiber Science I 3 

ENG 111 Comp. & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 3 

CH 101 Gen. Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Principles Chem 4 

MA 102 Analytic Geom. Calc. I 4 MA 201 Analytic Geom. Calc. II 4 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

14 15 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

T 301 Tech. Dyeing Finish 4 TC 303 Textile Chemistry I 2 

CH 221 Organic Chem. I 4 T 305 Intro. Color Science 1 

MA 202 Analytic Geom. Calc. Ill 4 CH 223 Organic Chem. II 4 

T 250 Fabric Form. System 4 PY 205 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 1 MA 301 Appl. Diff. Equat 3 

— Free Elective 3 

17 Physical Education 1 

18 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

TC 461 Chemistry of Fibers 3 Phys. Chem./Thermo. Elect.**** 3 

Dyeing Finishing Elective** 4 Dyeing Finishing Elect.** 5 

PY 208 General Physics 4 Humanity-Social Sci. Elect 6 

T 220 Yarn Form. System 4 Free Elective 3 

Phys. Chem./Thermo. Elect.**** 3-4 — 

17 

18-19 



176 



Fall Semester 



Dyeing Finishing Elective** 3 

Polymer Chemistry Elective*** 3 

Humanity-Social Science Elect 6 

PAMS Elective* 2-4 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 

. 3 Polymer Chem. Elect. 



14-16 



Credits 



Textiles Elective' 2-6 

Humanity-Social Science Elect 6 

Free Elective 3 



14-17 



Hours Required for Graduation 130 



Restricted electives in 

* PAMS^-2-4 credits from the following: 

CSC 111 2 

CH 315 4 

ST 361 3 

CSC 101 + CSC 251 4 



Dyeing and Finishing — 9 credits from the following: 

TC 304 2 

TC 401 3 

TC 403 3 

TC 404 3 

3 additional credits from the list above or the following: 

TC 490 1-6 

TC 491 1 

Polymer Chemistry — 6 credits from the following: 

T 402 3 

TC 504 3 

TC 561 3 

TC 562 3 

Physical Chemistry/Thermodynamics — 6 credits from the following: 

CH 431 3 CH 431 3 CHE 205 

CH 433 3 CH 495 (Physical . 3 CHE 316 

— Chemistry) — 

6 6 



TC 405 1 

TC 406 2 

TC 412 3 

TC 505 3 

T 506 3 

TC 591 3 

T 493 3 



TC 569 

TC 591 (Polymer Lab Course) 
TX 460 



1 Textiles 



-2-5 credits in TC, TXT or T courses at 300-500 level (including any elective course in 
dyeing and finishing or polymer chemistry listed above). 



DYEING AND FINISHING OPERATIONS CONCENTRATION 



Fall Semester 



T 101H Fundament, of Text 2 

ENG 111 Comp. & Rhetoric 3 

CH 101 Gen. Chemistry I 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geom. Calc. A 4 

Physical Education 1 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 

T 203 Fiber Science I 3 

ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 3 

CH 107 Principles Chem 4 

MA 212 Analytic Geom. Calc. B 3 

Physical Education 1 



Fall Semester 

T 301 Tech. Dyeing Finish 4 

CH 221 Organic Chem. I 4 

T 250 Fabric Forming Syst 4 

or 

T 220 Yarn Forming Syst 4 

Humanity-Social Science Elect 3 

Physical Education 1 



if, 



14 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

TC 303 Textile Chem 



14 



Credits 

I 2 

T 305 Intro. Color Sci 1 

CH 223 Organic Chem. II 4 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

Humanity-Soc. Science Elect 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

TC 461 Chem. of Fiber 3 

T 220 Yarn Forming Syst 4 

or 

T 250 Fabric Forming Syst 4 



18 



Cr<,litx 



Spring Semester 

Phys. Chem./Thermo. Elect.**** 4 

TC 404 Text. Chem. Tech 3 

TC 406 Text. Chem. Tech. Lab 2 

TC 412 Text. Chem. Analysis 3 



177 



TC 403 Text. Chem. Tech 3 

TC 405 Text. Che. Text. Lab 1 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

Humanity-Soc. Science Elect 3 



Humanity-Social Sci. Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



18 



Fall Semester 

PAMS Elective** 2-4 

Text. Elect.* 6 

Textiles Elective*** 3 

Humanity-Social Science Elect 3 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

PAMS Elective** 3-4 

Textile Chem. Elective* 3 

Textiles Electives 2-4 

Humanity-Social Science Elect 3 

Free Elective 3 



14-16 



14-17 



Hours Required for Graduation 129 



* Textile Chemistry Electives: 9 hrs. from following: TC 304; TC 401; TC 490; TC 491; TC 561; 

TC 562; TC 569; TC 591; T 402, T 493 
** PAMS Electives: 5-8 hrs. from following or related courses: 

MA 114; MA 301; CH 315; ST 361; CSC 111; 
CSC 200 or CSC 101 -I- CSC 251 
*** Textile Electives: 5-7 hrs. from any TC, TX or T courses in 300-500 level. 
**** Physical Chemistry/Thermodynamics elective: either CHE 205 or CH 331 

Note: (1) any course listed in Dyeing and Finishing Science or Polymer Chemistry may be sub- 
stituted for required courses in Dyeing and Finishing Operations in the same subject and 
at the same level. Example MA 102 for MA 112 or PY 205 for PY 211. 

(2) any student wishing Textile Management training is encouraged to select from the fol- 
lowing list of courses for the 5-7 hours designated for textile elective courses: 
TX 380 TX 484 

TX 480 TX 491 - Supervision 

TX 482 TX 586 

POLYMER CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION 



Fall Semester 

T 101H Fundament, of Textiles 2 

ENG 111 Comp. & Rhetoric 3 

CH 101 Gen. Chemistry I 4 

MA 102 Analytic Geom. Calc. I 4 

Physical Education 1 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

T 203 Fiber Science I 3 

ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 3 

CH 107 Principles Chem 4 

MA 201 Analytic Geom. Calc. II 4 

Physical Education 1 



14 



IS 



Fall Semester 



T 301 Tech. Dyeing Finish 4 

CH 221 Organic Chem. I 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geom. Calc. HI 4 

T 250 Fabric Form System 4 

Physical Education 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 
TC 303 Textile Chem. I 2 



T 305 Intro. Color Science 1 

CH 223 Organic Chem. II 4 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

MA 301 Appl. Diff. Equa 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



is 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

TC 461 Chem. of Fibers 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

T 220 Yarn Form. System 4 

Phys. Che./Thermo. Elect.**** 3-4 

Humanity-Soc. Sci. Elect 3 



Spring Semester 
Phys. Chem./Thermo. 



Credits 

Elect.**** 3 

PAMS Elective* 2-4 

Polymer Chem. Elect.*** 3 

Humanity-Soc. Sci. Elect 3 

Free Elective 3 



17-18 



14-16 



178 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Dyeing Finishing Elective** 3 Polymer Chem. Elect.*** 3 

Polymer Chemistry Elective*** 6 Textiles Elective' 2-5 

Humanity-Social Sci. Elect 6 Humanity-Social Sci. Elect 6 

Free Elective 3 Dyeing Finishing Elect.** 3 



18 14-17 
Hours Required for Graduation 130 



Restricted electives in 

* PAMS — 2-4 credits from the following: 

CSC 111 2 

CH 315 4 

ST 361 3 

CSC 101 + CSC 251 4 

** Dyeing and Finishing — 6 credits from the following: 

TC 304 2 TC 406 2 

TC 401 3 TC 505 3 

TC 403 3 TC 591 3 

TC 404 3 T 506 3 

TC 405 1 TC 412 3 

*** Polymer Chemistry electives — nine credits from the following: 

TC 504 3 TC 569 3 TC 591 (Polymer Lab Course) 3 

TC 561 3 TX 460 3 

TC 562 3 T 402 3 

Three additional credits from either the list above or the following: 

TC 490 1-6 TC 591 3 

TC 491 1 T 493 3 

**** Physical Chemistry /Thermodynamics — 6 credits from the following: 

CH 431 3 CH 431 3 np CHE 205 4 

CH 433 _3 CH 495 (Physical . 3 CHE 316 _3_ 

, Chemistry) — 7 

6 6 

• Textiles — 2-5 credits in TC, TXT or T courses at 300-500 level (including any elective course in 
dyeing and finishing or polymer chemistry listed above). 



Textile Technology 

Nelson Textile Building 

Professor D. S. Hamby, Acting Head of the Department 
Assistant Professor E. E. Hutchison, Academic Coordinator 
Associate Professor M. L. Robinson Jr., Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: J. F. Bogdan, A. H. El-Shiekh. T. W. George, S. P. Hersh, P. R. Lord. M. H. Mohp.med, 
J. A. Porter Jr.; Associate Professors: E. H. Bradford, W. D. Cooper, C. L. Dyer, R. E. Fornes. 
P. L. Grady, B. S. Gupta, J. W. Klibbe, J. J. F. Knapton. W. E. Moser, J. E. Pardue, W. C. Stuckey 
Jr.. P. A. Tucker; Adjunct Associate Professors: V. F. Holland, J. C. Lumsden. N. C. Morosoff, 
D. M. Powell, P. E. Sasser; Associate Professor Emeritus: T. G. Rochow; Assistant Professors: 
F. W. Massey, H. M. Middleton Jr.; Adjunct Assistant Professor: M. W. Suh; Instructor: G. W. 
Smith; Lecturer: T. R. Rhodes 

CURRICULUM 

The curriculum the first two years is concerned primarily with the physical 
sciences, humanities and social sciences, and with limited but important basic 
studies in textile fundamentals. The major work in textiles is done the junior and 
senior years. 

The textile technology curriculum provides as general an education as possible, 
while preparing the graduate for a profitable, rewarding textile career. This is 
accomplished through an integration of the physical and social sciences and the 
application of these sciences and economics to the field of textiles. 



179 



In addition to the wide selection of sciences, the student has the opportunity 
for diversification within the School of Textiles. The curriculum offers depth in 
such selected areas as fiber and yarn technology, fabric technology, knitting 
technology, general textiles and textile management. 

For graduate degrees, see pages 12-13. 

CONCENTRATIONS 

For a student to develop a second field of interest, the Department of Textile 
Technology offers an opportunity for the selection of a concentration from a 
discipline outside the department. Not only can strength be developed in a second 
discipline, but upon completion of the undergraduate work, one may pursue a gradu- 
ate program of study in textiles or in the concentration discipline. 

FACILITIES 

Textile technology has laboratory areas for processing of short staple fibers, 
long staple synthetic fibers, throwing and texturizing continuous filament yarns. 
Laboratories for the study of the formation of woven, knitted and nonwoven fabrics 
including tufting and yarn preparation systems are available. The knitting labora- 
tories include a hosiery section, circular and double knitting, warp and flat knitting, 
and knit goods finishing. The department has extensive facilities for physical 
testing of fibers, yarns and fabrics. A textile physics laboratory includes equipment 
designed for specialized problems related to textiles. 

TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry* 

or 
MA 102 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus I 4 

T 101 Fundamentals of Textiles 2 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Spring Semester 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 



Credits 



CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A or 
MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I 

or 
MA 201 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus II 4 

T 220 Yarn Forming Systems 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



Credit 8 



Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus B 
or 
MA 202 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus III 3 or 4 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics for 

Engineers 3 

T 203 Fiber Science I 3 

T 250 Fabric Forming Systems 4 

Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester 

CSC 200 Introduction to Computers & 

Their Uses 3 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

PY 205 General Physics 



or 



PY 211 
TX 211 
TX 330 



17-18 



General Physics 4 

Fiber Science II 3 

Textile Measurements & 

Quality Control 4 

Physical Education 1 



18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

PY 212 General Physics 
or 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

TC 301 Technology of Dyeing & Finishing . 4 
TX 320 Design & Control of Staple 

Yarn Systems 5 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

TX 340 Principles of Knitted Fabric 

Structures 5 

TX 350 Woven Fabric Structures 5 

TX 380 Management & Control of 

Textile Systems 3 

Concentration Hours (Programs A. B, C) ... 3 



16 



180 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

TX 460 Physical Properties of Textile Concentration Hours (Programs A, B. C) ... 6 

Fibers Free Electives 6 

or — 

TX 560 Structural & Physical 16 

Properties of Fibers 3 

Concentration Hours (Programs A, B, C) ... 6 Hours Required for Graduation 180 

Free Elective 3 

15 



* MA 114 may, under certain circumstances, be substituted for MA 111. 

The mathematics sequence for qualifying students shall be MA 102, 201 and 202. 
Eighteen credit hours of humanity-social science electives are required. These 18 
hours are to include three credit hours of English and EB 201. Students are en- 
couraged to take a minimum of two courses in the areas chosen to fulfill the 
humanity-social science requirement. The choice of course sequence and scheduling 
will be planned by the faculty adviser and the student. 

PROGRAM A, TEXTILE SCIENCE 

Program A is designed for the student interested in pursuing advanced studies in 
the basic and applied sciences. The textile courses in the concentration emphasize 
the physics and mechanics of textile structures and materials. The program is 
ideally suited for, but not limited to, those interested in pursuing graduate studies 
in the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy programs. The actual sequence 
of courses constituting the 15 hour concentration is based upon student interest 
with adviser approval. Typical courses from which the concentration may be 
structured are: MA 301, MA 511, ESM 301, PY 411, PY 412, PY 413, T 500, TC 
461, TX 561. The student selects at least six hours of 400 or 500 level textile 
courses. 

PROGRAM B, TEXTILE MANAGEMENT 

Program B, consisting of 15 hours, is based upon a background in basic economics 
and is designed to develop an understanding of management control systems, 
decision-making theories and marketing and distribution systems. Six hours of 
course work must be selected from ACC 260, EB 420, 307, 326, 431, and 332, TX 
586. The student would be expected to select at least six hours of 400 or 500 level 
textile courses. 

PROGRAM C, GENERAL 

Program C allows students to elect advanced courses in the field of textiles. These 
courses may be selected from the elective offerings by the School of Textiles and 
may be used to develop in-depth study in yarn forming, fabric forming, microscopy, 
quality control, textile chemistry or combinations of these areas. 

For those students interested in developing a sequence of courses in a discipline 
outside of the School of Textiles, these 15 hours may be used, in whole or in part 
for a sequence of courses comprising the program of study planned by the student 
and faculty adviser and approved by the Head of Textile Technology. 



University Studies 

Harrelson Hall 

Professor A. C. Barefoot, Head 

Professors: D. Huisingh, J. R. Lambert Jr.. J. C. Wallace; Assistant Prcfumor: R. L. Hoffman; 
Instructor: C. L. Stalnaker; Visiting Assistant Professor: Elisabeth Wheeler 

181 



University Studies is an academic unit responsible for interdisciplinary programs 
dealing with contemporary issues and problems. Courses are taught by teams of 
faculty drawn from the Division and from the academic disciplines relating to the 
problems or issues under consideration. These courses are open without prerequi- 
sites to students in all curricula. 

Military Education and Training 
DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE (ARMY ROTC) 

Professor: LTC S. A. Holcomb; Instructors: LTC B. J. Baucom. Capt. G. N. Edgar. Capt. L. G. 
Lupus, Capt. M. P. Kehoe, Capt. C. M. Rowley 

DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES (AIR FORCE ROTC) 

Professor: LTC H. D. Woods; Instructors: Maj. M. T. Curran, Capt. J. E. Harper, Capt. H. O. Sea- 
graves 

The Department of Military Science (Army ROTC) and the Department of Aero- 
space Studies (Air Force ROTC) are separate academic and administrative sub- 
divisions of the institution. 

The mission of the Army ROTC program is to produce well-educated commis- 
sioned officers in sufficient numbers to meet Army requirements. 

The mission of the Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps (AFROTC) is to 
recruit and, through a college campus education program, commission second 
lieutenants in response to Air Force requirements. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 

Army ROTC — The program of instruction for the Army ROTC consists of a 
two-year basic course and a two-year advanced course. Also available is a two-year 
program designed for junior college graduates and students at four-year colleges 
who were unable to take ROTC during their first two years of college. 

Air Force ROTC — The program of instruction consists of a two-year general 
military course, a field training course, and a two-year professional officer course. 

Students desiring to enter either the Army or Air Force two-year program should 
contact the Military Science Department, Room 154, Reynolds Coliseum, or the 
Aerospace Studies Department, Room 145 Reynolds Coliseum, before the start of 
the spring semester of their sophomore year. 

The Army and Air Force ROTC units conduct a flight instruction program. A 
limited number of highly qualified Army cadets participate and receive 36V2 hours 
of flying in light aircraft. All Air Force ROTC cadets who are qualified and have 
volunteered for active duty pilot training receive 25 hours of flying. Both programs 
include ground school training. Successful completion of the Army program may 
qualify cadets for a Federal Aviation Agency private pilot's certificate. 

Satisfactory completion of the advanced courses qualifies a student for com- 
missioning as a second lieutenant in the Army or Air Force Reserve upon gradua- 
tion from the University. 

SELECTION 

Army ROTC — The selection of advanced-course students is made from appli- 
cants who are physically qualified and who have above average academic and 
military records. Veterans who have one year or more of service in the Armed 
Forces are eligible for enrollment in the Army ROTC advanced course upon 
reaching their junior year, provided they are in good academic standing, physically 



182 



qualified, and have not reached their 27th birthday and are selected by PMS and 
the University administration. 

Air Force ROTC — A student enrolled in the Air Force ROTC may pursue a four- 
year program or a two-year program. Both offer the opportunity for receiving an 
AFROTC scholarship. 

Students, to meet enrollment requirements for the professional officer course, 
must achieve a qualifying score on the Air Force Officer Qualification Test 
(AFOQT) and the SAT/ACT, meet necessary physical requirements and must have 
good academic records. Qualified veterans desiring a commission through an Air 
Force ROTC program complete the two-year advanced program and, in most cases, 
attend four weeks of field training. Non-veterans must complete the two-year 
general military course, the two-year professional officer course, and attend four 
weeks of field training. Non-veterans may elect to successfully complete six weeks 
field training and the two-year professional officer course in lieu of the above four- 
year program. Cadets must complete either program before their 30th birthday to 
qualify for a commission. 

Credit — Credit is allowed for work at other institutions having an ROTC unit 
established in accordance with the provisions of the National Defense Act and 
regulations governing the ROTC. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Students in the Army basic or Air Force general military course, other than 
scholarship students, receive no monetary allowance. For summer training of four 
to six weeks, students receive pay and travel allowance. All Army and Air Force 
students in their last two years receive a subsistence allowance of $100 (tax free) 
per month. Scholarships which pay for tuition, all fees and textbooks are available 
to both Army and Air Force cadets. 

Army ROTC — One-, two-, three- and four-year scholarships are available to 
selected Army ROTC students who are strongly motivated toward a career in the 
Army. 

Air Force ROTC — A limited number of selected students enrolled in the Air 
Force ROTC program may qualify for two-, three- and four-year scholarships. 

Uniforms — Uniforms for Army and Air Force ROTC are provided by the Univer- 
sity from commutation funds paid by the Federal government. 

ORGANIZATION 

Army — The Army ROTC unit at N. C. State consists of a cadet battalion, com- 
manded by a cadet lieutenant colonel, and comprised of a headquarters company 
and lettered companies. The cadet lieutenant colonel and all other cadet officers 
are selected from students enrolled in the second year advanced course. Cadet 
sergeant majors, first sergeants and sergeants first class are appointed from stu- 
dents enrolled in the first year advanced course. Certain specially selected students 
in the second year basic course also are appointed as cadet non-commissioned 
officers. Cadet officers and non-commissioned officers conduct all drill instruction 
with supervision by the University's Army faculty. 

Air Force — The Air Force ROTC unit is organized as a cadet group (commanded 
by a cadet colonel) with an appropriate number of squadrons; the squadrons are 
composed of flights and squads. The group, squadron and flight commanders and 
their staff are cadet commissioned officers and are selected from cadets enrolled 
in the professional officers course. All other positions are held by cadet non- 
commissioned officers who are selected from general military course cadets. Cadet 
officers and non-commissioned officers plan and conduct the cadet group operation 
with AFROTC faculty supervision. 



183 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS 

The University names outstanding students of the Army ROTC and Air Force 
ROTC as Distinguished Military Students or Distinguished Air Force ROTC 
Cadets. These students may, upon graduation, be designated Distinguished Military 
Graduates or Distinguished Air Force ROTC Graduates. Distinguished Military 
Graduates may be commissioned in the Regular Army. 



Graduate School 

V. T. Stannett, Vice Provost and Graduate Dean 

The Graduate School provides instruction and facilities for advanced study and 
research in the fields of agriculture and life sciences, design, education, engineer- 
ing, forestry, liberal arts, physical and mathematical sciences and textiles. 

The School is currently composed of more than 1,000 graduate faculty members 
within the eight academic schools. Educated at major universities throughout the 
world and established both in advanced teaching and research, these scholars 
guide the University's graduate student body of some 2,500 men and women from 
all areas of the United States and about 70 other countries. 

The faculty and students have available exceptional facilities, including libraries, 
laboratories, modern equipment and special research areas. 

For a list of graduate degrees offered at North Carolina State University, see 
pages 12-13. Consult the Graduate Catalog for details on programs and admission. 

University Extension 

1911 Building 

W. L. Turner, Vice Chancellor for Extensiori and Public Service 

L. H. Hammond, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 

M. F. Hester, Assistant to the Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 

The University administration is linked to the faculty of the various schools and 
with clientele groups throughout the state through the Vice Chancellor for Exten- 
sion and Public Service, extension field staff, and through advisory or liaison 
groups. The University's overall extension program is coordinated through the 
Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service who administers program develop- 
ment, management of interschool and interinstitutional extension programs and 
projects and provides staff assistance for campus wide extension programs. 

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 

R. A Mabry, Director 

Associate Directors: J. Porter, D. B. Stansel; Assistant Director: C. F. Kolb; 

Assistant to the Director: H. H. Ethridge; Continuing Education Specialists: 

K. R. Crump, In Charge, J. F. Cudd Jr., D. Fender, D. S. Jackson, A. Lanier, 
H. G. Walker 

The Division of Continuing Education of N. C. State is the statewide adult 
education service linking the University, its scholars, research, and resources with 
the people and communities of the State. The programs vary in length and format 
from one-day conferences and short courses to regular semester-length classes and 
educational television. 

The Division's programs are designed to meet the needs of any adult who can 
benefit from university-level study. The instructional staff consists of University 
faculty, from N. C. State and other institutions and authorities in specific fields. 



184 



Only those programs appropriate to the standards of scholarship and instruction 
of N. C. State are offered. Both credit and noncredit programs are offered on the 
University campus, in communities throughout the State and by correspondence 
instruction. 

Correspondence Courses — The Division offers more than 38 different courses 
in 14 subject areas and in high school review courses in English and mathematics. 
These courses are administered through the "Independent Study by Extension" 
UNC Extension Division, 121 Abernethy Hall, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514. 

Credit and Noncredit Evening Classes — The Division offers, during the fall and 
spring semesters, a series of credit and noncredit courses on the University 
campus. The credit courses are sponsored and taught by the University's academic 
departments and are generally conducted in the late afternoon and evening. These 
courses are offered to the already occupied mature person who is unable to attend 
classes during daytime hours. Approximately 110 courses in a variety of subject 
areas are given each semester. The noncredit classes are designed for cultural 
and professional enrichment. 

Off-Campus Credit Courses — Extension classes are offered throughout the State. 
These classes are mainly on a need basis or by request from organizations or special 
groups. Courses are available in almost all subject matter areas from engineering 
to the social sciences. In 1973 the Division administered 80 credit classes in 27 
different locations with registration totaling over 1,400. 

Short Courses, Institutes, and Conferences — Short courses, institutes and confer- 
ence programs, more than any others, mark the University's efforts to meet its 
Land-Grant tradition of providing education to all the people. The scope of the 
programs include: agriculture, engineering, forestry, textiles, the physical sci- 
ences, economics, management, communications, education, and recreation. During 
1975-76 there were 225 courses offered with registrations totaling over 19,000. 

The University awards Continuing Education Units to participants in qualified 
programs. Continuing Education Units are a part of a nationwide recording system 
to provide a uniform measure of attainment in noncredit educational programs. 
One CEU at N. C. State is defined as "ten contact hours of participation in an 
organized continuing education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable 
direction, and qualified instruction." 

SUMMER SESSIONS 

C. F. Kolb, Director 

The Summer Sessions at N. C. State offer an extensive education program to 
meet the varied needs and interests of almost 9,000 students who come to the 
campus each summer. 

Each of the University's eight schools — represented by more than 55 different 
departments — offers instruction in over 600 courses, more than 40 percent of which 
are at the graduate level. A faculty of more than 300 participates in programs for 
summer study. Six of the eight schools offer regular courses during the two five- 
week terms. Design offers one nine-week program. Forest Resources conducts a 
summer camp for sophomores and two five-week practicums. In addition, numerous 
special programs and institutes are offered during the summer. Summer courses 
and special programs meet the needs of undergraduate and graduate students of 
N. C. State and visiting students pursuing degrees from other institutions. 

For information regarding summer activities write: Director of Summer Sessions, 
Box 5125, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 

Water Resources Research Institute 

The Water Resources Research Institute is a unit of the University of North 
Carolina System and is located on the campus of North Carolina State University. 
The deans of the School of Engineering and School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, 
the Dean for Research at North Carolina State University and two faculty members 
from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill serve as a board of directors. 
The Institute was established to promote a multidisciplinary attack on water prob- 

185 



lems, to develop and support research in response to the needs of North Carolina, 
to encourage strengthened educational programs in water resources, to coordinate 
research and educational programs dealing with water resources, and to provide a 
link between the state and federal water resources agencies and related interests in 
the University. 

Research and educational activities are conducted through established depart- 
ments and schools of the University System. All senior colleges and universities 
of North Carolina are eligible to participate in the Institute's research program. 
Applications for research grants must be received by October 1 for the Matching 
Grants Program and February 4 for the Annual Allotment Program preceding the 
fiscal year for which funds are requested. Basic support for the Institute's program 
is provided by the Office of Water Research and Technology, U. S. Department of 
the Interior, under the Water Resources Research Act of 1964, as amended, the 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and appropriations from the State of North 
Carolina. 

The Institute has sponsored a graduate minor in water resources which offers a 
strong water resources program with the major in any of the basic disciplines con- 
tributing to water resources planning, conservation, development and manage- 
ment. This capitalizes on the combined training resources of the Raleigh and 
Chapel Hill campuses of the University System and offers these in an organized 
way to graduate students seeking interdisciplinary training in this field. Additional 
information concerning the program is presented elsewhere in this catalog. 

The Institute sponsors research and educational symposia and seminars, en- 
courages the development of specialized training opportunities, and provides a 
means for the continuing evaluation and strengthening of the University System's 
total water resources program. 




Civil engineering students learn 
surveying principles in order to under- 
stand the applications of surveying 
in planning, design and construction. 



The artifacts of Asian religions are 

examined by students studying 

other cultures. 




186 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



In a typical course description, the semester hours of credit, the number of actual 
lecture and laboratory hours of meeting per week, and the term or terms in which 
the course is offered are shown in this manner: 2(1-2) F, S, Sum. or 1-3 F, S, Sum. 

The 2 indicates the number of semester hours credit given for satisfactory 
completion of the course. The (1-2) indicates that the course meets for one hour of 
lecture and for two hours of laboratory work each week. The 1-3 indicates a 
minimum of 1 and a maximum of 3 semester hours credit can be earned. This is 
to be arranged with the instructor. The F designates the course is to be given the 
fall semester. Likewise, S designates spring; Sum, summer. 

Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are: CI, consent of instructor; 
grad., graduate; undergrad., undergraduate; sr., senior; jr., junior; soph., sopho- 
more; fr., freshman; preq., prerequisite; coreq., corequisite; lab., laboratory; lect., 
lecture; and alt. years, alternate years. 

Waiver of prerequisites is at the discretion of the instructor. 



CONTENTS 



Accounting (ACC) 188 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 

(ALS, AC) 189 

Animal Science (ANS) 189 

Anthropology (ANT) 191 

Architecture (ARC) 192 

Art (ART) 192 

Biochemistry (BCH) 192 

Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering (BAE) 193 

Biological Sciences (BS) 195 

Biomathematics (BMA) 195 

Botany (BO) 196 

Chemical Engineering (CHE) 198 

Chemistry (CH) 200 

Civil Engineering (CE) 203 

Computer Science (CSC) 207 

Crop Science (CS) 210 

Design (DF, DN) 212 

Economics and Business (EB) . . . .216 

Education (ED) 220 

Electrical Engineering (EE) 229 

Engineering (E) 232 

Engineering Honors (EH) 233 

Engineering Operations (EO) . . . .233 
Engineering Science and 

Mechanics (ESM) 233 

English (ENG) 236 

Entomology (ENT) 239 

Food Science (FS) 240 

Foreign Languages 242 

Classics (GRK, LAT) 242 

English for Foreign Students 

(FLE) 242 

Foreign Languages and 

Literatures 243 

French (FLF) 243 



German (FLG) 244 

Italian (FLI) 245 

Portuguese (FLP) 245 

Russian (FLR) 246 

Spanish (FLS) 246 

Forestry (FOR) 247 

Genetics (GN) 250 

Geology (GY) 251 

History (HI) 254 

Horticultural Science (HS) 259 

Industrial Arts (IA) 261 

Industrial Engineering (IE) 262 

International Student 

Orientation (ISO) 267 

Landscape Architecture (LAR) . . .267 

Liberal Arts (LA) 267 

Marine Sciences (MAS) 267 

Materials Engineering (MAT) ...268 

Mathematics (MA) 270 

Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering (MAE) 275 

Meteorology (MY) 281 

Microbiology (MB) 282 

Military Education and Training .283 

Aerospace Studies (AS) 283 

Military Science (MS) 284 

Music (MUS) 285 

Nuclear Engineering (NE) 286 

Nutrition (NTR) 287 

Operations Research (OR) 287 

Pest Management (PM) 288 

Philosophy (PHI) 288 

Physical Education (PE) 291 

Physical Oceanography (OY) 293 

Physics (PY) 293 

Physiology (PHY) 296 

Plant Pathology (PP) 297 

Political Science (PS) 297 



187 



Poultry Science (PO) 302 Statistics (ST) 317 

Product Design (PD) 302 Textile Chemistry (TC) 319 

Psychology (PSY) 303 Textile Technology (TX) 320 

Recreation Resources Textiles (T) 323 

Administration (RRA) 307 Toxicology (TOX) 325 

Religion (RED 308 University Studies (UNI) 325 

Social Work (SW) 309 Veterinary Science (VET) 326 

Sociology (SOC) 310 Visual Design (PVD) 326 

Soil Science (SSC) 314 Wood and Paper Science (WPS) . .326 

Speech-Communication (SP) 315 Zoology (ZO) 329 



Accounting 

(Also see Economics and Business.) 

ACC 260 Accounting I— Concepts of Financial Reporting. 3(3-0) F,S. Financial 
reporting concepts, the information generating process, income measurement, resource 
valuation, corporate equity measurement, reporting practices, and the interpretation and 
analysis of financial statements. Introduction to internal controls and merchandising and 
manufacturing inventories. Staff 

ACC 261 Accounting II— Financial Information Systems. Preq: ACC 260. 3(3-0) F,S. In- 
formation systems and their generation of financial data for reporting purposes. Includes 
consideration of the reporting practices related to noncorporate entities, financial statement 
structures and classifications, and internal controls. Staff 

ACC 262 Managerial Use of Cost Data. Preq: ACC 260. 3(3-0) F,S. Managerial uses of 
cost data in planning, controlling, and evaluating organizational activities and in making 
business decisions. Includes consideration of budgeting, cost behavior, product costing and 
pricing, and an introduction to production cost. Staff 

ACC 360 Financial Reporting Theory and Practice I. Preq: ACC 261. 3(3-0) F,S. The 
preparation of working papers and financial statements, the valuation and reporting 
problems relating to cash, receivables, inventories, investments, and tangible and intangible 
assets. Consideration of related professional pronouncements. Bergold, Brown 

ACC 361 Financial Reporting Theory and Practice II. Preq: ACC 360. 3(3-0) F,S. The 
valuation and reporting problems relating to current and non-current liabilities, and cor- 
porate and non-corporate owners' equities. Includes cash and fund-flow reporting, the 
analysis of financial statements, the impact of price-level changes on financial reporting, and 
professional literature. Bergold, Brown 

ACC 362 Production Cost Analysis and Control. Preq: ACC 262. 3(3-0) F,S. Managerial 
reporting practices for producing activities, the development and use of cost standards and 
budgets, and the cost measurement of productive inputs for units of productive outputs. 
Managerial use of cost data in analyzing, planning, and controlling business activity. Con- 
sideration of information systems and internal controls. Brown 

ACC 460 Specialized Financial Reporting Theory and Practice. Preq: ACC 361. 3(3-0) 
F. The specialized valuation and reporting problems relating to consolidated financial state- 
ments, business combinations and reorganizations, governmental and nonprofit organiza- 
tions, home office and branch relationships, foreign affiliates, estates and trusts, and 
business firms experiencing financial difficulties. Study of related professional 
publications. Windham 

ACC 464 Income Taxation. Preq: ACC 260. 3(3-0) F,S. Federal and state income tax laws 
relating to individuals and other taxable or reporting entities, the measurement and 
reporting of taxable income, and basic research in taxation. Introduction to tax 
planning. Pinna, Messere 

ACC 466 Examination of Financial Statements. Preq: ACC 361. 3(3-0) S. The objectives, 
standards, procedures, problems, practices and theory of financial statement examination as 
performed by independent public accountants. The professional standards and ethical codes, 
the features of information systems and internal control, and other professional topics. Ex- 
tensive use of professional literature and authoritative pronouncements. Staff 

188 



ACC 468 Professional Accountancy Resume. Preqs: ACC 362 and 460. 3(3-0) S. A review 
and summation of the theory and practice of financial reporting and professional accoun- 
tancy, as they relate to preparation for the certified public accountant's examination, cover- 
ing both their general and specialized topics. Windham 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 
GENERAL COURSES 

ALS 103 Introductory Topics in the Agricultural and Life Sciences. 1(1-0) F. The scope 
and objectives of a university education with emphasis on the sciences, particularly as 
related to biology and agriculture. Guest lectures and departmental programs 
presented. Glazener, Craig 

ALS 299 Superior Student Seminar. Preq: Fr. and soph, honor students. 1, Maximum 2. 
S. Seminar program open only to fr. and soph, students in the honors program. Participation 
is by invitation. Staff 

ALS (LA) 490 International Seminar. Preq: Jrs. and srs., upperclassmen interested in in- 
ternational affairs. 1(1-0) S. A weekly series of seminars on the economic and social aspects of 
developing countries. Staff 

ALS 499 Honors Student Research. 1-3, Maximum 6. S. A research program open only to 
jr. and sr. students in the honors program. Participation is by invitation. Staff 

AGRICULTURAL INFORMATION 

AC 331 Communication Methods and Media. Preq: ENG 112. 3(3-0) S. Written, oral and 
visual techniques of communiciations; a survey of the channels of communications available; 
principles and techniques for using these channels individually or combined into a publicity, 
promotion, public relations, information or advertising program. Carpenter 

Animal Science 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science. 4(3-3) F,S. The fundamental principles of 
dairying and meat animal production. The importance of dairy and meat products in the diet 
and in the economy. Goode, Rakes 

ANS 204 Livestock Feeds and Feeding. 3(2-3) S. An introduction to applied animal 
nutrition, including the structure and function of the digestive tract, the nutrient value and 
classification of feedstuffs and the nutrient requirements and formulation of livestock 
rations. Leatherwood 

ANS (FS.NTR) 301 Nutrition and Man. Preq: Two years of college work. 3(3-0) F,S. Basic 
principles relating to practical problems in the provision and utilization of nutrients for in- 
dividuals and populations under various environmental conditions. McNeill 

ANS 302 Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals. 2(0-6) S. Market classes and grades of beef 
cattle, swine and sheep are used to study live animal-carcass value interrelationships. Breed 
histories, pedigrees and desirable characteristics of dairy cattle, meat animals and quarter 
horses. Harvey, Wilk 

ANS 308 Advanced Selection of Dairy and Meat Animals. Preq: ANS 302. 1(0-3) F. In- 
cludes intensive practice in selecting market and purebred livestock. Harvey. Wilk 

ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology. Preq: ZO 421. 3(2-3) S. Current concepts of 
physiology related to mammalian reproduction. Emphasis on physiological processes, how 
they are influenced by external forces and their importance in reproductive performance. 

Myers, Johnson 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management. Preq: ANS 204. 3(2-3) S. Modern management prac- 
tices emphasizing the application of principles of genetics, ruminant nutrition and animal 
health to cow-calf programs and to stocker and feeder cattle operations. Harvey 

ANS 403 Swine Management. Preq: ANS 204. 3(2-3) S. The economic, nutritional, 
genetic, physiological and managerial factors affecting the operation of modern swine enter- 
prises. Clawson 

189 



ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management. Preq: ANS 204. 3(2-3) S. Dairy farm management, 
including feed acquisition and utilization, breeding and selection, health and sanitation, 
herd replacements and dairy farm buildings. Emphasis upon the consequences of manage- 
ment alternatives and the importance of herd and farm business records. Davenport 

ANS 405 Lactation. Preq: ZO 421. 3(2-3) F. Gross and microscopic anatomy of the 
developing and the mature mammary gland. Physiological processes involved in milk secre- 
tion and the removal of milk from the gland. Research problem required. Mochrie 

ANS 406 Sheep Management. Preq: ANS 204. 3(2-3) F. The economic, genetic, 
nutritional, physiological and managerial factors affecting the operation of the modern sheep 
enterprise. (Offered F 1977 and alt. years.) Goode 

ANS (FS) 409 Meat and Meat Products. 3(2-3) S. (See food science, page 240.) 

ANS 410 Horse Management. 3(2-2) F. Application of fundamentals of selection, nutri- 
tion, breeding and animal health to light horses. Managerial details are covered. Barrick 

ANS 411 Breeding and Improvement of Domestic Animals. Preq: GN 411. 3(2-2) F. 
Genetic principles are stressed in relation to the improvement of economically important 
domestic animals. Emphasis on the specific requirements of breeding plans for individual 
species. McDaniel 

ANS (NTR.PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition. Preq. CH 220 or 221. 3(3-0) F. Fundamen- 
tals of animal nutrition, including the classification of nutrients; the requirement and 
general metabolism by different species for health, maintenance, growth and other produc- 
tive functions. Ramsey, Donaldson 

ANS (NTR) 416 Quantitative Nutrition. Preq: BCH 351 or equivalent. 3 (1-6) F. Quan- 
titative principles are applied to nutrition by using animals and microorganisms in practical 
experiments. Armstrong 

ANS 490 Animal Science Seminar. 1(1-0) S. Review and discussion of special topics in all 
phases. Lassiter 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANS (PHY) 502 Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates. Preq: ZO 421 or CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Emphasis upon discussion of mechanisms which control reproductive processes. Those which 
are species-limited are compared with those shared by all. Current knowledge of some sub- 
systems is investigated in detail and others are referred to in reviews of well-documented 
research. Ulberg 

ANS (VET) 505 Diseases of Farm Animals. 3(3-0) F. (See veterinary science, page 326.) 

ANS (GN) 508 Genetics of Animal Improvement. Preq: GN 411, ST 511. 3(3-0) S. 
Emphasis upon the utilization of basic principles of population and quantitative genetics in 
animal improvement. Factors affecting genie and genotypic frequencies and methods of es- 
timating genetic and non-genetic variance, heritabilities and breeding values. The roles of 
mating systems and selection procedures in producing superior genetic populations. 

Robison 

ANS 520 Tropical Livestock Production. Preq: Six hours of ANS at 400-level or CI. 3(3- 
0) S. Modern principles of feeding, genetics, forage production and management are applied 
to improvement of meat and dairy animals in tropical, subtropical and high-altitude en- 
vironments. Considers biological and socio-economic constraints to development of livestock 
industry. Discussion of climatic effects on production applies to U.S. conditions and to 
developing tropical countries. W. L. Johnson 

ANS (PHY) 580 Mammalian Endocrine Physiology. Preqs: BCH 351, ZO 421. 3(3-0) F. 
Detailed discussions of the mammalian endocrine system emphasizing the functional aspect, 
chemistry and mode of action of specific hormones secreted by major endocrine glands. 
Modern biochemical and physiological principles of hormonal integrations and neuroen- 
docrine integration. B. H. Johnson 

ANS 590 Topical Problems in Animal Science. Maximum 6 F,S. Special problems are 
selected or assigned. Staff 



190 



Anthropology 

(Also see Sociology.) 

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology. 3(3-0) F,S. The evolution of man and his antecedents is 
illustrated by a study of fossil materials from Africa, Europe and the Far East. The course 
emphasizes the process of evolution, morphology, classification systems, dating techniques, 
the beginnings of culture and communication, and human variation, including contemporary 
races; and increases awareness of man as a culture-bearing primate. 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. Through the study of nonliterate pea- 
sant and complex societies, an overview is given of the history of ethnological theory, 
methods in cultural anthropology, ethnographic field-work, personality and culture, the 
socialization process, cultural ecology, structural-functional analysis, language, art and 
society, kinship systems, political and economic anthropology, religions, magic and 
witchcraft, and social and cultural change. 

ANT 305 Peoples of the World. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Introductory course in ethnology which 
develops a general understanding of the culture of primitive peoples, peasants, and of 
modern man. Specific problems are investigated such as cultural ecology, evolution, sub- 
sistence practices, nutrition, and economic development. 

ANT 405 Indians of North America. Preq: Six hours ANT and/or SOC. 3(3-0) F. 
Analyzes North American Indian and Eskimo life, including: 1) theories of provenience and 
an overview of selected prehistoric cultural manifestations; 2) peoples and cultures at the 
time of European contact; 3) the nature and concomitants of contacts between native 
Americans and whites; 4) examines contemporary Indian and Eskimo problems relating to 
identity, accommodation, assimilation and self-determination. 

ANT 406 Peoples and Cultures of South America. Preq: Six hours ANT and/or SOC. 
3(3-0) S. Introduces student to the types of social groups found in South America, and ex- 
plores the cultural development from prehistoric times to the present. Analyzes problems 
facing their developing nations from an anthropological point of view, stressing the in- 
terrelationships between the national decision-making processes and the small community. 

ANT 416 Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology. Preq: Six hours ANT. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Provides a systematic experience with anthropological field techniques, i.e., community 
mapping; household census; kinship analysis; life-history recording; participant observation; 
inventory of material culture; child rearing observation. Familiarizes student with conven- 
tional anthropological field tools, i.e., tape recorder, motion picture camera, still camera, 
fieldwork journal, unstructured interview. Through textbooks and supplementary reading, 
provides a view of anthropologists' reports of their own field methods and problems 
encountered. 

ANT 420 Biological Bases for Human Social Behavior. Preq: ANT 251, or BS 100 or 
105, or GN 301, or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. This course entails an examination of the relevancy 
and applicability of animal behavior to the study of human social behavior. The nature and 
uniqueness of human behavior is evaluated in light of what is known about the social 
behavior of animals, particularly the nonhuman primates. 

ANT 498 Special Topics in Anthropology. Preq: Six hours of SOC/ANT 1-6 F,S. A 
detailed investigation of a special topis in anthropology. The topic and mode of study will be 
determined by the faculty member(s) and the student. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANT 505 Comparative Social Organization. Preq: ANT 501 or six hours cultural 
anthropology. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. Course focuses on an analysis of forms of social organization in 
both technologically simple and complex societies from several analytical perspectives. Dis- 
cussion of kinship theory: the relationship of social organization to systems such as the 
economic, political, and religious; an examination of modern development in social organiza- 
tion research will be stressed. 

ANT 508 Culture and Personality. Preq: ANT 501 or six hours cultural anthropology. 
3(3-0) Alt. yrs. Course focuses on the interplay between cultural norms and the enculturation 
process. Within a cross-cultural perspective, it examines the process by which cultural norms 
are transmitted and learned, as well as the effect of culture change on the individual. The 



191 



historical development of the field as well as contemporary trends are also discussed in both 
theoretical and applied contexts. 

ANT 511 Anthropological Theory. Preqs: Six hours SOC, ANT 252 and 305, or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) Approaches theory from both an historical and contemporary point of 
view. Emphasizes the key anthropological concept of culture and its significance for un- 
derstanding man and his works. 

ANT 512 Applied Anthropology. Preq: ANT 252 or CI. 3(3-0) Includes a review of the 
historical development of applied anthropology and a study of anthropology as applied in 
government, industry, community development, education and medicine. The processes of 
cultural change are analyzed in terms of the application of anthropological techniques to 
programs of developmental change. 

ANT 591 Special Topics in Anthropology. Preq: ANT 501 or equiv. 3 F,S. Course is 
designed to provide the opportunity for students to investigate in some depth particular topic 
in anthropology. Course content and mode of study will vary, reflecting current student 
needs and interests. Topics will be determined by the faculty members(s) and student. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ANT 501 Advanced Survey of Cultural Anthropology. 3(3-0) F. 

Architecture 

(See Design.) 

Art 

Art 200 The Visual Arts in Contemporary Life. 3(3-0) F,S. For undergraduates who are 

not majors in Design. Painting, sculpture, crafts, the useful arts of commerce, and the 

aesthetic nature of man are studied to increase understanding of man's artistic achievements 

and relate creative experience to every day life. Staff 

Biochemistry 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry. Preq: CH 223. 3(3-0) F,S, Sum. A survey course to 
introduce basics of biochemistry and the various areas of research the discipline 
encompasses. Armstrong, Horton, Main 

BCH 352 Elementary Biochemistry Laboratory. Preq: BCH 351 (may be taken con- 
currently). 1-2. F,S. A laboratory experience to complement BCH 351 which will emphasize 
basic biochemical laboratory techniques and analysis of data. Knopp, Miller 

BCH 490 Special Studies in Biochemistry. Preq: Senior standing. 1-3 F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BCH 551 General Biochemistry. Preq: Three years of CH including CH 223 or 
equivalent; CH 331 or 431 strongly recommended. 3(3-0) F. Principles of modern 
biochemistry including structural and metabolic relationships of carbohydrates, lipids, 
proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes and metabolic regulation. Jones 

BCH 552 Experimental Biochemistry. Preq: CH 223; CH 315 recommended; Coreq: 
BCH 551. 3(1-6) F. Introduction to fundamental techniques of biochemistry and molecular 
biology involving experimental study of carbohydrates, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, 
lipids, metabolism and subcellular organization. Theil 

BCH (PHY) 553 Physiological Biochemistry. Preq: BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. Application of 
biochemical methods to the elucidation of the function of whole organisms. A. Biochemistry 
of 1) blood, 2) water, electrolyte, acid-base balance, 3)renal function, 4) muscle metabolism, 
5) central nervous system, 6) autonomic nervous system, and 7) endocrine system. B. Bio- 
chemistry of adaptation to environment 1) high and low P 0)> 2) hot and cold, 3) wet and dry, 
and 4) pollution. Longmuir 

BCH 554 Radioisotope Techniques in Biology. Preq: BCH 351 or CI. 2(-3) S.Sum. The 
different modes of radioactivity are correlated with methods of measurement. Emphasis on 
use and limitations of various instruments and techniques and on their application to 
research problems. Sisler 

192 



BCH 557 Introductory Enzyme Kinetics. Preq: BCH 551 and MA 201 or MA 212. 3(3-0) 
S. Basic principles of chemical kinetics are applied to the development of enzyme kinetics. 
Limitations of the Michaelis equation are considered in light of the general rate equation. In- 
hibition and activation, pH functions, effects of temperature, elucidation of mechanisms, 
and transient state and relaxation kinetics are also considered. Main 

BCH (GN, MB) 561 Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. Preq: BCH 351 or 551, GN 
411 or 505, MB 401 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The development of biochemical and microbial 
genetics, emphasizing both techniques and concepts currently used in research. Lectures and 
discussions of current research publications. Armstrong 

BCH 590 Special Topics in Biochemistry. Preq: BCH 351 or equivalent. Credits 
Arranged, Maximum 3. F,S,Sum. Topics of special interest studied by small groups of stu- 
dents under faculty supervision, usually for the purpose of developing new courses. Staff 

Biololgical and Agricultural Engineering 

BAE 201 Shop Practices. 2(1-3) F.S. Designed to give the student an understanding of 
materials, tool processes and safety practices related to the operation and maintenance of a 
mechanized farming operations as well as general shop practice related to other agricultural 
industries. Laboratory exercises will be used to relate theory to practice as basic shop skills 
are developed. Blum, Howell 

BAE 211 Farm Machinery. 3(2-3). F.S. A study of the operations, servicing, and adjust- 
ment of farm machines. Functional and energy requirements, and efficient operations as well 
as economic considerations in ownership, are stressed. Howell 

BAE 251 Elements of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Preq: Enrollment in 
SBE curriculum. 3(2-3) F. Pertinent topics basic to agricultural engineering and current 
progress relating to the different subject areas. Introduction to various engineering 
procedures, tool processes and materials utilized by the agricultural industries. Blum 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BAE 303 Energy Conversion in Biological Systems. Preq: BS 100, MA 112 or 201, PY 
205 or 211. 2(2-0) S. Energy transformations and exchanges of plants and animals are studied 
on the basis of physical theories and principles. Discussion of examples in convection, con- 
duction, radiation, phase change, muscle work, photosynthesis, respiration and concentra- 
tion of solutions. Suggs 

BAE (SSC) 321 Water Management. Preq: Junior standing. 4(3-3) F. The application of 
water management principles is examined. Topics discussed include the hydrologic cycle, 
runoff, surface and subsurface drainage to include open ditch drainage and land forming, 
irrigation, erosion, soil conservation practices such as terracing, contouring and strip cropp- 
ing, sedimentation, farm pond construction, open channel flow, environmental laws that per- 
tain to water management, and the basic principles of surveying. Sneed 

BAE 332 Farm Structures. Preq: PY 211 or 221. 3(2-3) S. Environmental relationships, 
design methods, materials, construction procedures and layout practices as they relate to 
current changes in agricultural production techniques. Problem situations relating to farm 
structures are investigated individually by each student in the laboratory. Emphasis on 
relating the theory to current applications. Blum 

BAE 341 Farm Electrification and Utilities. Coreq: PY 212 or 221. 4(3-3) S. Practical 

and efficient use of electricity as an energy source for agricultural and home applications. 
Topics include energy conservation, electric rates, farm and house wiring, circuit design, 
single phase and three-phase distribution systems, electric motors, lighting, heating, electric 
controls, safety and protective devices, and home water systems. Glover 

BAE 342 Agricultural Processing. Preq: MA 301, MAE 301. 4(3-2) S. Theory and ap- 
plication of heat and mass transfer to processing of agricultural crops. Topics include psy- 
chrometrics, thin layer and deep bed drying, continuous-flow drying, and principles of 
biochemical processing. Problem sessions will demonstrate principles of fluid flow, materials 
handling, process control, and various drying systems. Young, Johnson 

BAE 361 Analytical Methods. Preq: MA 301; Coreq: ESM 307. 3(2-3) F. Develops skills 
in mechanical design and problem solving. Mechanical design includes graphical and 

193 



analytical determinations of velocity and acceleration, analysis and synthesis of linkages, 
design and/or selecting of beams, shafts, columns, bearings, clutches, brakes, gears, belts and 
chains. Approximately one-fourth of the course develops skills related to converting ill- 
defined problem situations into tractable engineering problems. Bowen 

BAE 381 Agricultural Structures and Environment. Preq: ESM 307, MAE 301. 3(2-3) 
S. Principles of environmental control and structural analysis are combined with biological 
principles for the design of agricultural structures. Topics include physiological reactions of 
animals, plants and agricultural produce to their environment, applications of heat transfer 
and psyehometrics in calculating ventilation requirements and heating or cooling loads, 
structural analysis, material selection, agricultural waste management, and economic con- 
siderations of various structural alternatives. Baughman 

BAE 391 Electrotechnology in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Preq: EE 331. 
3(2-3) F. Basic concepts for selecting and utilizing electromagnetic devices. Switching cir- 
cuits and central circuits are discussed and transducers and measurement techniques are 
related to agricultural problems. McClure 

BAE 411 Farm Power and Machinery. Preq: BAE 211, PY 211 or 221. 3(2-3) S. The ap- 
plication of heat engineering principles in the development and utilization of power of inter- 
nal combustion engines, both spark ignition and diesel. Thermodynamic principles and their 
application to the actual design and construction of engines. Principles of carburetion and 
ignition. Power transmission units, hydraulics and hydraulic controls. Power measurement 
and testing, and the economic utilization of power units. Fore 

BAE (FS) 432 Food Engineering II. 3(2-3) S. (See food science, page 240.) 

BAE 433 Processing Agricultural Products. Preq: PY 212. 4(3-3). S. This course will in- 
vestigate the equipment used for agricultural processing on the farm or farm-related enter- 
prises. The principles of operation and design features of processing equipment will be 
covered. Major topics include: (1) feed grinding and (2) milk processing, (3) cleaning, 
grading, and handling agricultural commodities, (4) crop drying and storing, and (5) 
refrigerated storage. Young, Willits 

BAE 451, 452 Agricultural Engineering Design I and II. Preq: Sr. standing in SBE 
curriculum. 3(1-6) F,S. Design concepts are applied to current agricultural engineering 
problems. One major design project is combined with a variety of case studies and short term 
design problems. Rohrbach 

FAE 461 Analysis of Agricultural Systems. Preq: MA 114 or 112, EB 212. 3(2-2). F. 
Easic concepts of systems analysis with application to agricultural problems. Tools and 
methodology of systems analysis. Topics include economics of decision making, linear 
programming, networks and inventory. A unit on machinery management includes cost 
analysis, scheduling, selection and replacement. Sowell 

BAE 462 Functional Design of Field Machines. Preqs: BAE 361 or equivalent, SSC 200. 
3(2-3) S. The design and operation of the modern farm tractor and field machines that make 
effective use of energy and labor in farm commodities production. Topics include (a) engine 
cycles and efficiencies, Nebraska test procedures, power trains, traction efficiencies, rolling 
resistances, and hitching of tractors and (b) principles and devices used to accomplish 
functional objectives in tillage, planting, pesticide application and harvesting equip- 
ment. Bowen 

BAE (CHE) 465 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. 3(3-0) F. (See chemical 
engineering, page 198.) 

BAE (SSC) 471 Agricultural Water Management. Preq: BS 100, SSC 200. 4(3-2) F. 
Aspects of hydrology and soil-water-plant relationships as related to agricultural water 
management. Drainage and irrigation emphasized. Water quality, agricultural related pollu- 
tion, and water laws discussed. Skaggs 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BAE 552 Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and Processing. Preqs: EE 331, 
MA 301. 2(1-3) Alt. F. Theory and application of primary sensing elements and transducers. 
Generalized performance characteristics and the use of standards. Use of specialized 
measurement systems for agricultural research and processing including an introduction to 
correlation and power spectral density measurements. McClure 

194 



BAE (CE.MB) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. Preq: MB 401 or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. 
Aspects of microbiology and biochemistry as related to problems of stream pollution, refuse 
disposal and biological treatment. Laboratory exercises present basic microbiological techni- 
ques and illustrate from a chemical viewpoint some of the basic microbial aspects of waste 
disposal. Staff 

BAE (CE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management. Preq: Grad. or advanced undergrad. 
standing. 3(2-3) F. Special laboratory techniques required for the characterization of 
agricultural and associated processing wastes. Principles and examples to develop waste 
management and nondestructive waste utilization systems that are integral to the total 
operations. Humenik 

BAE (FS) 585 Biorheology. Preq: PY 205, ESM 307. 3(2-2). Alt. S. The concepts of 
strain, stress and the mechanical viscoelastic properties of biological solids, fluids and 
slurries. The time-dependent deformation and flow of bio-materials elements of strength of 
materials, rheological equations and model concepts, creep-relaxation and dynamic 
behavior, contact problems and the Boltzman superposition principle as a function of time, 
temperature and moisture content. Hamann 

BAE 590 Special Problems. Preq: Sr. or grad. standing in agricultural engineering. 
Credits Arranged. Each student selects a subject for research and writes a technical report on 
results. Subject may pertain to any area of study in BAE. Staff 

Biological Sciences 

BS 100 General Biology. 4(3-3) F,S,Sum. Basic principles and concepts including the 
structure and function of cells and organisms, the organization and requirements of living 
systems, development, heredity and evolution. Lytle, Barthalmus, Staff 

BS 105 Biology in the Modern World. 4(3-3) F,S. For students who are not science ma- 
jors. Treats the broad themes or principles of biology, such as metabolism, homeostasis, and 
interrelationships of organisms, at all levels of biological organization (i.e., molecular to 
biome). Emphasis on the organismic level with man as the representative organism; his 
physiology, behavior, genetics and ecology are treated in depth. Wynn 

BS (ENT) 410 Biology of Insects. 3(2-2) F,Sum. (See entomology, page 239.) 

BS 495 Special Topics in Biology. 1-6 F,S,Sum. Independent research projects super- 
vised by faculty member. Projects selected with faculty assistance and with approval of the 
coordinator of the Biological Sciences interdepartmental program. 

BS 590 Special Problems in Biological Instrumentation. Preq: CI. 1-3, F,S. Basic com- 
ponents of spectrophotometers including light sources, dispersing devices, detectors and 
read-out methods; theoretical and practical aspects of electron microscopy; basics of analog 
and digital computing methods and applications of computers to biological research; 
methods of separation and identification of bio-polymers; principles of measurement; and 
the application of electronics in biological measuring and sensing devices. Staff 

Biomathematics 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BMA 451 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems. Preq: MA 
112; two biology courses. Credit not allowed for BMA, MA or ST majors. 3(3-0) S. Intended 
primarily for students in biological sciences to develop an understanding of how biological 
concepts may be formulated in mathematical terms and how these formulations may be used 
in biological research. Topics include use of diagrams and flow charts in mathematical 
modeling, set relations, measurement error, proper use of dimension, probability models, 
rate equations, control and feedback. Illustrative examples from a variety of biological 
fields. Gold 

BMA 493 Special Topics in Biomathematics. Preq: CI. 1-3 F,S. Directed readings, 
problem sets, written and oral reports at an introductory level to meet student need and in- 
terest; 400-level courses during the developmental phase. Staff 
BMA 501 Theoretical Biochemistry I. Preqs: MA 405, CH 433, BCH 551 or CI. 3(3-0) F. 
Application of physical theory and mathematics to biochemistry. Examination of basic prin- 

195 



ciples of molecular theory, reaction rate theory, statistical mechanics and nonequilibrium 
thermodynamics as applied to biochemical systems. (Offered F 1975 and alt. years.) Gold 

BMA 502 Theoretical Biochemistry II. Preq: BMA 501. 3(3-0) S. Coupling of diffusion 
and chemical reactions. Mathematical description of enzyme control, coupled sequences of 
enzyme reactions, feedback loops and oscillatory' reactions. Experimentally oriented topics 
include theory of chemical relaxation and tracer dynamics. (Offered S 1976 and alt. 
years.) Gold 

BMA (MS, ST) 571 Biomathematics I. Preq: Advanced calculus, reasonable 
background in biology or C.I. 3(3-0) F. The role of theory construction and model building in 
the development of experimental science. Induction vs. deduction. The historical develop- 
ment of mathematical theories and models for the growth of one-species populations (logistic 
and offshoots), including consideration of age distributions (matrix theory, Leslie and Lopez: 
continuous theory. Lotka). Elementary theories on growth of organisms (von Bertalanffy, 
with applications to ecology; allometric theories, cultures grown in a chemostat). 
Mathematical theories of two and more species systems (predator-prey, competition, sym- 
biosis; according to the Volterra-Lotka schemes, including present-day research), and 
related models for chemical reaction kinetics. Emphasis on scrutiny of the biological con- 
cepts and of the mathematical structure of the models in order to uncover weak and strong 
points. Mathematical treatment of differential equations in these models stresses qualitative 
and geometric aspects. van der Vaart 

BMA (MA, ST) 572 Biomathematics II. Preqs: BMA 571, elementary probability theory. 
3(3-0) S. Advanced mathematical techniques concerning nonlinear differential equations of 
the types encountered in BMA 571: several concepts of stability, asymptotic directions, 
periodic models. Comparison of deterministic and stochastic models for several biological 
problems including birth and death processes. Certain aspects of linear system theory (time- 
invariant and variable models) used for the analysis of biological systems. Some recent 
research. van der Vaart 

BMA 591 Special Topics. Preq: CI. Maximum 3 F,S. Directed readings, problem sets, 
written and oral reports to meet student need and interest; 500-level courses during the 
developmental phase. Staff 

Botany 

BO 200 Plant Life. 4(3-3) F,S,Sum. A survey of the types of plants and their diversities in 
structure, life cycle, habitat, and economic importance. Witherspoon, Van Dyke 

BO 320 Local Flora. 2(0-4) F,S,Sum. A field study for non-majors of the vascular plants of 
the area with emphasis on identification, ecology, and natural history. May be taken during 
the spring and fall, spring and summer or summer and fall, or all three semesters, for a max- 
imum of 6 hours credit. Hardin, Stucky 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology. Preq: A 200 level biology course. 4(3-3) F,S,Sum. 
The relationships between organisms and their environment, and of the interactions among 
organisms. An overview of basic ecology principles and their importance to man and his 
environment. Staff 

BO 400 Plant Diversity. Preq: BO 200. 4(3-3) F. A comprehensive survey of the 
evolutionary diversity and phylogeny of the plant kingdom. Emphasis on the evolutionary 
trends and the basis for assumed relationships, considering fossils as well as living forms. 

Hardin 

BO (CS) 402 Economic Botany. Preq: BO 200. 3(2-3) S. Emphasis is on plants and 
human affairs. Discussions center on all phases of the interrelatonships of the plant world 
and the life history of incipient to modern human cultures. Treatment includes plants and 
plant products, beneficial and harmful, that man has used as necessities of life, as 
ameliorants contributing to his well-being, and as raw materials for industry. Ornamentals 
are excluded. Timothy 

BO 403 Systematic Botany. Preq: BS 100 or 105 or BO 200. 4(2-4) S. A systematic survey 
of vascular plants, emphasizing terminology, family characteristics, field identification, 
general evolutionary relationships, and mechanisms of plant speciation. Stucky 

BO (ZO) 414 Cell Biology. 3(3-0) F. (See zoology, page 329.) 
196 



BO 421 Plant Physiology. Preq: BS 100, BS 105 or BO 200, one year of college chemistry. 
4(3-3) F.S. Physiology of the green plant emphasizing plant organization, water and solute 
relationships, organic and inorganic nutrition, growth and development. Noggle, Trover 
BO 480 Air Pollution Biology. Preq: An introductory biological course and chemistry, jr. 
standing. 3(2-3) S. The effects of air pollutants on biological systems at the subcellular, 
cellular, tissue, organ, individual and community level. Anderson 

BO 499 Independent Study in Botany. Preq: At least eight hours of botany, advanced 
standing, and presentation of plan of work approved by a faculty member. 1-3 F,S. Discus- 
sions, library research, field or laboratory investigations of topics under faculty direction on a 
tutorial basis. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 510 Plant Anatomy. Preq: BO 200. 4(2-6) F. The cells, tissues and organs of common 
flowering plants and gymnosperms. Growth and differentiation patterns with emphasis on 
current research. Anderson 

BO 522 Advanced Morphology and Phylogeny of Seed Plants. Preq: BO 403. 4(3-3) S. 
Survey of morphology and evolution of angiosperms and gymnosperms. Emphasis on 
detailed vegetative and reproductive morphology of fossil and living forms, and on their 
presumed evolutionary relationships. (Offered S 1977 and alt. years.) Hardin 

BO 524 Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes. Preq: BO 403. 4(2-6) F. Course deals with three 
large, economically and ecologically important plant families. An introduction to ter- 
minology, extensive field work emphasizing keying our plants collected, and a study of recen- 
tly developed classification of the grasses. (Offered F 1977 and alt. years.) Staff 

BO 544 Plant Geography. Preqs: BO 360, BO 403, GN 411, or equivalents. 3(3-0) S. 
Descriptive and interpretive plant geography, synthesizing data from ecology, genetics, 
geography, paleobotany and taxonomy. Includes a survey of the present distribution of major 
vegetation types throughout the world. A discussion of the history and development of this 
present pattern of vegetation, and of the principles and theories of plant geography. (Offered 
S 1978 and alt. years.) Staff 

BO 551 Advanced Plant Physiology I. Preq: General botany or biology, and biochem- 
istry. 3(3-0) F. The first half of a two-semester sequence covering the current status of plant 
physiology. Topics include plant organization, metabolism, respiration, and water and solute 
relations. Trover 

BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II. Preq: General botany or biology, and 
biochemistry. 3(3-0) S. The second half of a two-semester sequence. Topics include 
photobiology, photosynthesis, inorganic nutrition, plant growth substances, physiology of 
seeds, vegetative growth, reproductive growth, aging and senescence. Noggle 

BO 553 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology I. Preq or Coreq: BO 551. 1(0-3) F. 
Accompanies BO 551. Laboratory procedures in plant nutrition, plant structure and com- 
position, water relations, respiration. Staff 

BO 554 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology II. Preq or Coreq: BO 552. 1 (0-3) S. 
Accompanies BO 552. Laboratory procedures in enzymes, photosynthesis, photobiology, 
plant growth substances. Staff 

BO (ZO) 560 Principles of Ecology. Preq: Three semesters of college-level biology 
courses. 4(3-3) F. Provides a factual and philosophical framework for the understanding of 
ecology. Staff 

BO 561 Physiological Ecology. Preqs: BO 421, BO (ZO) 560, or equivalents. 4(3-3) S. Ap- 
proaches the plant community from a physiological standpoint. Emphasis on the individual 
in the community and how it responds to its immediate environment on a short- and long- 
term basis (Offered S 1977 and alt. years, i Blum 

BO 565 Plant Community Ecology. Preqs: BO (ZO) 560 or BO (ZO) 360 or equiv. 4(3-3) 
F. Consideration of the structure and function of terrestrial vascular plant communities with 
emphasis on classical and recent research. Topics include measurement and description of 
community properties, classification, ordination, vegetation pattern in relation to environ- 
ment, ecological succession, and a survey of the vegetation of North America. 

Went worth 

197 



BO 570 Quantitative Ecology. Preqs: BO (ZO) 560 and ST 512 of equiv. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
A course emphasizing the quantitative techniques and theories of vegetation analysis. Topics 
include sampling methodologies, the evaluation of sample adequacy, spatial patterns and 
species associations, the measurement and interpretation of ecological diversity, gradient 
analysis and classification of communities, and plant population dynamics. Each of these 
topics will be considered from a theoretical and a practical basis. This involves local field 
trips, sampling, data analysis, computer programming, and interpretation in light of con- 
temporary ecological theories. (Offered F 1978 and alt. years.) Reynolds 

BO (MB) 574 Phycology. Preq: BS 100 or BO 200. 3(1-4) S. An introduction to the classes 
of algae. The systematic position, life history and ecology of important genera in the local 
flora, both fresh-water and marine. Witherspoon 

BO (MB.PP) 575 The Fungi. Preq: BO 200 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. An overview of the 
fungi within the framework of a survey of the major classes. Topics include ultrastructure, 
environmental adaptations, sexuality, ontogeny, and economic importance. Van Dyke 

BO (MB.PP) 576 The Fungi-Laboratory. Coreq: BO 575. 1(0-3) F. Provides illustrative 
material of the fungal assemblages discussed in BO 575. Van Dyke 

BO 590 Topical Problems. Preq: CI. 1-3 F,S. Discussions and readings on problems in 
ecology, anatomy and morphology, taxonomy, and plant physiology. May be repeated, with 
change in topic, for a maximum of six credits. Graduate Staff 

Chemical Engineering 

CHE 205 Chemical Process Principles. Preq: CH 107, MA 201. 4(3-2). F.S. Engineering 
methods of treating material balances, stoichiometry, phase equilibrium calculations, ther- 
mophysics, thermochemistry, and the first law of thermodynamics. Felder 

CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems. Preq: PY 208; Coreq: MA 301. 4(3-2). F.S. Process 
measurements of importance in chemical engineering: temperature, pressure, flow rate, level, 
concentration. Static calibration of measuring instruments. An introduction to process 
dynamics and control via theory and experiment. Marsland 

CHE (UNI) 300 Chemical Technology and the Environment. 3(3-0) F. Provides a basis 
for informed judgment regarding appropriate political, economic and technical means to pre- 
vent and control pollution. Chemical technology as a source of pollution and as a means for 
pollution control. Open to all students. Hopfenberg 

CHE 301, 302 Elements of Chemical Engineering. Preq: (301) MA 212;(302) CHE 301. 
3(3-0) F,S. Principles including calculations involved in industrial processes and equipment. 
For students not majoring in CHE. Seely 

CHE 311 Transport Processes I. Preq: MA 301, PY 208, CHE 205. 3(3-0) F,S. Momen- 
tum and heat transfer with emphasis on applications in chemical processing. Problems in the 
design of fluid flow systems and heat exchangers. Rousseau 

CHE 315 Chemical Process Thermodynamics. Preq: CHE 205, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. The 
laws of thermodynamics and their application to chemical engineering problems, both in 
theory and in practice. Criteria of equilibrium in physical and chemical changes. Behavior of 
real fluids, including mixtures. Beatty 

CHE 316 Thermodynamics of Chemical and Phase Equilibria. Preq: CHE 315. 3(3-0) S. 
Thermodynamics is the principal tool for systematic study of chemical reaction equilibria 
and phase equilibrium. Fugacity, activity and chemical potential as methods for predicting 
the effect of temperature, pressure, etc. on equilibrium compositions. Methods for measuring 
and estimating thermodynamics properties important to equilibrium calculation in real sys- 
tems. Hopfenberg 

CHE 325 Introduction to Plastics. Preq: CH 103. 3(3-0) F,S. Survey of plastics and 
polymers: types, applications, fabrication, processing and testing. Seely 

CHE 327 Separation Processes I. Preq: CHE 311. 3(3-0) S. Applying principles of 
transport phenomena to the unit operations of absorption, extraction, distillation, drying, 
filtration, etc. with emphasis on design procedures and economic consideration. Rousseau 

CHE 330 Chemical Engineering Lab I. Preq: CHE 205; Coreq: CHE 311. 2(0-4). F. 
Laboratory experiments in unit operations that augment the theory and data of CHE 311, 

198 



Transport Processes I, in the areas of momentum and heat transfer. An added emphasis is on 
technical report writing. Seely 

CHE 331 Chemical Engineering Lab II. Preq: CHE 330; Coreq: CHE 327. 2(0-4). S. A 
continuation of Chemical Engineering Lab I with emphasis on report writing and on the unit 
operation of absorption, extraction, distillation, drying, etc. Seely 

CHE 412 Transport Processes II. Preq: CHE 327. 3(3-0) S. Momentum, heat and mass 
transport processes, with emphasis on CHE. Problems in fluid, heat and mass 
transfer. Ferrell 

CHE 425 Process Measurement and Control I. Preq: CHE 225, 327. 3(2-2) F. The con- 
tinuous control of typical chemical engineering processes including the techniques of feed- 
back, cascade, feedforward and interacting systems. Dynamics, stability, and control of heat 
exchangers, flow systems, distillation columns and chemical reactors. Winston 

CHE 426 Process Measurement and Control II. Preq: CHE 425 or EE 435 or MAE 435. 
3(2-2) S. An extension of the theory and application of process control techniques to the 
analysis of physical systems. Sampled data and nonlinear systems and an introduction to op- 
timum control techniques and adaptive control. Martin 

CHE 432 Chemical Engineering Lab III. Preq: CHE 431. 3(1-5). F.S. Projects in 
research, design or development in various areas of chemical engineering. Seely 

CHE 446 Chemical Process Kinetics. Preq: CHE 315. 3(3-0) F. The characterization and 
measurement of the rates of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. The design and 
analysis of chemical reactors. Stahel 

CHE 451 Chemical Engineering Design. Preq: CHE 315, 327, 432. 3(2-2) F,S. Chemical 
process design and optimization. The interplay of economic and technical factors in process 
development, site selection, project design, construction and production management. Ap- 
plications of cost accounting, cost estimation for new equipment, measures of profit- 
ability. Marsland 
CHE (BAE) 465 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. Preq: MA 202 or 212, PY 212 
or 221. 3(3-0) F. Engineering applications to biomedical problems such as flow in the car- 
diovascular and respiratory systems; transfer of thermal energy in and from warm-blooded 
animals; transport of materials through physiological tissues and membranes, and perfor- 
mance of organ replacement and assist devices such as the artificial kidney and the intra- 
aortic balloon. Beatty 

CHE 495 Seminar in Chemical Engineering. Preq: One semester required of CHE 
srs. 1(1-0) F,S. Professional aspects and topics of current interest. Staff 

CHE 497 Chemical Engineering Projects. Preq: Elective of CHE srs. 1-3 F,S. Introduc- 
tion to research through experimental, theoretical and literature studies of CHE problems. 
Oral and written presentation of reports. Staff 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 511 Chemical Engineering Process Modeling. Preq: CHE 311, CHE 327, MA 301. 
3(3-0) S. The application of the methods of mathematical analysis to the formulation and 
solution of problems in transport phenomena, process dynamics and chemical reaction 
engineering. Felder 

CHE 513 Thermodynamics I. Preq: CHE 315. 3(3-0) F. An intermediate course in ther- 
modynamic principles and their applications to chemical and phase equilibria. The course is 
largely from a macroscopic viewpoint but consideration given to the statistical view- 
point. Beatty 

CHE 515 Transport Phenomena. Preq: CHE 327. 3(3-0) S. A theoretical study of trans- 
port of momentum, energy and matter with emphasis on the latter two. The diffusional 
operations, including coupled heat and mass transfer, are introduced in the light of the 
theory. Marsland 

CHE 517 Kinetics and Catalysis. Preq: CHE 446. 3(3-0) F. Homogeneous and heteroge- 
neous kinetic reactons. Emphasis on fundamental approaches, experimental methods and 
mathematical techniques in engineering analysis of chemical reaction systems. Stahel 

199 



CHE 521 Mass Transfer Operations. Preq: CHE 327 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Multicom- 
ponent operations will be discussed in light of recent developments and innovations in both 
the operations themselves and in calculational techniques used in analyzing the operations. 
The equilibrium stage concept will be developed. If there is time, the continuous rate 
processes will be discussed. Problems unique to given operations, such as are encountered in 
extractive and azeotropic distillation. Rousseau 

CHE 523 Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer. Preq: CHE 311. 3(3-0) F. Convective heat 
transfers in chemical process equipment, such as heat exchangers, chemical reactors, dis- 
tillation and extraction reboilers, etc., and fluid dynamics and heat transfer of multiphase, 
multicomponent and chemically reactive systems. Ferrell 

CHE 525 Chemical Process Control. Preq: CHE 425. 3(3-0) S. The application of control 
techniques to sampled data chemical process systems. Z-transform and state variable 
methods for the determination of open loop and closed loop system responses and for the syn- 
thesis of controller algorithms. Hybrid computer simulation and control of on-line real time 
processes. Winston 

CHE (OR) 527 Optimization of Engineering Processes. Preq: CSC 111, MA 301 and 
MA 405. 3(3-0) F. The formulation and solution of process optimization problems, with 
emphasis on nonlinear programming techniques. Computer implementation of optimization 
algorithms, and structuring of process models to increase computational efficiency. Felder 
CHE 535 Engineering Economy in Air Pollution Control Systems. Preq: MAE 409, CE 
576, or equivalent first course. 3(3-2) S. Principles and practice in designing equipment for 
the abatement of air pollution; estimation of capital cost and operating expense; economic 
optimization under various kinds of tax laws. Marsland 

CHE 541 Cellulose Industries. Preq: Organic chemistry. 3(3-0) F. Methods of manufac- 
ture and application of cellulose chemical conversion products. Emphasis is on recent 
developments of synthetic fibers, films, lacquers and other cellulose compounds. Seely 

CHE 543 Technology of Plastics. Preq: Organic chemistry. 3(3-0) S. The properties, 
methods of manufacture and applications of synthetic resins. Recent developments in the 
field. Schoenborn 

CHE 561 Biomedical Engineering I: Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer. Preq: CHE (BAE) 
465, or equivalent background. 3(3-0) S. The extension of fluid flow and heat transfer con- 
cepts to biomedical engineering is presented along with the grounding in physiology requisite 
to proper modeling of mammalian flow and thermal processes. Beatty 

CHE (TC) 569 Polymers, Surfactants and Colloidal Materials. Preq: CHE 315, CH 
431, 223. 3(3-0) F. The relationship between molecular structure and bulk properties of non- 
metallic materials as applied in CHE processes. Attention to the application of surface and 
colloid chemistry as well as polymer science. 

CHE (TC) 570 Radiation Chemistry and Technology of Polymeric Systems. Preqs: CH 
221, 431. 3(3-0) S. Principles and practice of isotope and electron beam radiation treatment. 
Applications of high energy radiation in polymer chemistry and technology, including the use 
of radiation to cross-link and degrade polymers. Similarities and differences between radia- 
tion polymerization and photopolymerization. Stannett, Williams 

Chemistry 

CH 101 General Chemistry I. 4(3-3) F,S,Sum. Fundamental concepts, including atomic 
and molecular structure, states of aggregation of matter, chemical reactions and stoi- 
chiometry. Should be followed by CH 103, 105 or 107. 

CH 103 General Chemistry II. Preq: CH 101. 4(3-3) F,S,Sum. Designed as a terminal 
course and for students in curricula which do not require full-year chemistry courses beyond 
the freshman level. Topics include acid-base reactions, homogeneous and heterogeneous 
equilibria, electrochemistry, and descriptive aspects of inorganic, organic, nuclear and 
biochemistry. 

CH 104 Experimental Chemistry. Coreq: CH 105. 1(0-3) F,S,Sum. Laboratory supple- 
ment to CH 105. Required for CH 105 students who plan to take additional chemistry 
courses. 



200 



CH 105 Chemistry— Principles and Applications. Preq: CH 101. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A con- 
tinuation of CH 101, intended primarily for engineering students. Emphasis on introductory 
chemical thermodynamics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and the ap- 
plication of basic chemical principles to the treatment of organic and inorganic systems. CH 
105 serves as prerequisite for additional chemistry courses only if supplemented by CH 104. 

CH 106 Laboratory Techniques I. Coreq: CH 101H. 1(0-3) F. For students majoring in 
chemistry to supplement CH 101 laboratory. 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry. Preq: CH 101 with a grade of C or better. 4(3-3) 
F,S,Sum. Continuation of CH 101 for students who plan to take a full-year course in advan- 
ced chemistry and for those desiring a more quantitative course than CH 103. Emphasizes 
detailed quantitative aspects of stoichiometry, kinetics, equilibrium and electrochemistry, 
and the treatment of chemical reactions in terms of acid-base concepts. 

CH 108 Laboratory Techniques II. Coreq: CH 107H. 1(0-3) S. For students majoring in 
chemistry to supplement CH 107 laboratory. 

CH 111 Foundations of Chemistry. 4(3-2) F,S,Sum. General chemistry for liberal arts 
students. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodic classification, gas laws, 
chemical equilibrium, and elementary descriptive inorganic and organic chemistry. 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry. Preq: CH 103 or 107, or CH 104 and 105. 4(3-3) 
F.S.Sum. Topics include alkanes and cycloalkanes, reactions of carbon-carbon multiple 
bonds, elimination and substitution reactions of alcohols and alkyl halides, aromatic com- 
pounds, carbonyl compounds, organic acids and derivatives, and organic bases. 

CH 221, 223 Organic Chemistry I, II. Preq: (221) CH 107; (223) CH 221. 4(3-3) F,S,Sum. 
CH 221 and CH 223 cover the fundamentals of organic chemistry, including both aliphatic 
and aromatic compounds. CH 221 deals mostly with structure, stereochemistry, reactions, 
and mechanisms associated with a study of the hydrocarbons. 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis. Preq: CH 103 or 107, or CH 104 and 105. (Credit not 
allowed for both CH 315 and 317.] 4(3-3) F,S,Sum Fundamental principles and modern 
techniques of chemical analyses. Topics include spectrochemical, electrochemical, and 
volumetric methods of analysis, modern chemical instrumentation, and interpretation of 
data. 

CH 317 Quantitative Analysis for Life Science Students. Preq: CH 103 or CH 107 or CH 
104-105. (Credit not allowed for both CH 315 and CH 317.) 4(3-3) S. An introduction to 
modern methods of qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis. Emphasis will be placed 
on clinical and biochemical techniques. 

CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry. Preqs: CH 103 or 107, or CH 104 and 105; MA 
102 or 112. 4(3-3) F,S. For students whose mathematics background is not sufficient to meet 
CH 431, 433 requirements, but who desire instruction on chemical principles above freshman 
level. 

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry. Coreq: CH 431. 3(3-0) S. Studies of theoretical 
principles and discussions of experimental synthetic, purification, and identification 
procedures pertaining to inorganic substances. The physical and chemical behavior of in- 
organic compounds is also discussed. 

CH 411 Analytical Chemistry I. Preq: CH 434. 4(2-6) F. Includes the design, execution, 
and interpretation of quantitative chemical measurements. Chromatographic, precipitation 
and spectroscopic methods. 

CH 413 Analytical Chemistry II. Preq: CH 411. 4(2-6) S. Methods of quantitative 
analysis based on solution chemistry, electrochemistry and reaction kinetics. 

CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis. Preq: CH 223. 3(1-6) F.S.Sum. Introduction to 
the systematic identification and separation of organic compounds by the application of both 
physical and chemical techniques. Infrared and nuclear magnetic spectroscopy, chemical 
classification tests, and the preparation of derivatives are used to acquaint the student with 
organic research methods. 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I. Preq: CH 107, MA 202, PY 203 or 208; Coreq: MA 301 . 3(3- 
0) F.S.Sum. CH 431 and CH 433 provide an intensive study of physical chemical principles 
including states of matter, classical and statistical thermodynamics, physical and chemical 

201 



equilibrium, properties of solids and solutions, electrochemistry, reaction kinetics, kinetic 

theory, and transport properties. Arrangement of topics between courses may vary from year 

to year. 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II. Preq: CH 431, MA 301. 3(2-1). F,S. (See description under 

CH 431.) 

CH 434 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory. Coreq: CH 433. 2(0-6) S. A project-oriented 

course to acquaint chemistry students with modern physical chemistry techniques. 

CH 435 Physical Chemistry III. Preq: CH 431, MA 301. 3(3-0) F. A continuation of CH 

431, emphasizing quantum mechanics, molecular structure and chemical bonding. 

CH (TC) 461 Chemistry of Fibers. 3(3-0) F. (See textile chemistry, page 319.) 

CH 490 Chemical Preparations. Preq: Three years of CH. 3(1-6) F,S. Lectures and 
laboratory work in preparative chemistry. Synthetic procedures illustrate advanced methods 
and techniques in both inorganic and organic chemistry. 

CH 491 Honors Chemistry. Preq: Admission to honors program or consent of department. 
1-3 F,S. A special studies course for superior students pursuing chemistry studies in greater 
depth. 

CH 493 Chemical Literature. Preq: Three years of CH. 1(1-0) F. A systematic introduc- 
tion to the location and retrieval of information required for the solution of chemical 
problems. 

CH 495 Special Topics in Chemistry. Preq: CI. 1-3 F,S. To serve needs not covered by ex- 
isting courses. 

CH 499 Senior Research in Chemistry. Preq: Three years CH. Credits Arranged. 1-3 
F,S,Sum. Independent investigation of a research problem under the supervision of a 
chemistry faculty member. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CH 501 Inorganic Chemistry I. Preq: CH 433. 3(3-0) F. Modern chemistry from the point 
of view of the chemical bond, molecular structure, and spectroscopy. Several topics chosen 
from group theory, molecular symmetry, molecular orbital and crystal field theories, elec- 
tronegativity, solid state, magnetic properties, electronic absorption, ORD, CD, and MCD, 
Mossbauer, nmr, nqr, ESCA, photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Computer 
facilites are used. 

CH 503 Inorganic Chemistry II Preq: CH 501. 3(3-0) S. A continuation of CH 501. 
Knowledge of physical methods applied to chemistry of representative elements, transition 
metals (3d, 4d, 5d), lanthanides, and actinides. Topics include nonaqueous solvents, acids 
and bases, inorganic reaction mechanisms, solid state reactions, coordination chemistry in- 
cluding chelates and organometallic compounds, crystal field stabilization energy, Jahn- 
Teller and trans effects, stabilization of valence states, and some bio-inorganic chemistry. 

CH 511 Chemical Spectroscopy. Preq: CH 433 3(3-0) F. Theory, analytical applications 
and interpretation of spectra as applied to chemical problems. Emphasis upon ultraviolet, 
visible and infrared spectra. (Offered F 1978 and alt. years.) 

CH 515 Chemical Instrumentation. Preq: CH 431; Coreq: CH 411. 3(3-0) S. Basic elec- 
tronic components and circuits, the response of laboratory instruments, design and modifica- 
tion of typical electronic control and measurement systems. Emphasis on transducers and 
control elements utilized in chemical research. (Offered S 1978 and alt. years.) 
CH 517 Physical Methods of Elemental Trace Analysis. Preq: CH 315 or 331 or CI. 3(3- 
0) F. The principles and applications of currently used methods of trace analysis. Topics in- 
clude pulse polarography, potentiometry, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, atomic absorption, 
emission spectrometry, fluorescence, neutron activation analysis, and spark source mass 
spectrometry. 

CH 518 Trace Analysis Laboratory. Coreq: CH 517 or CI. 2(0-6) F. Instrumental techni- 
ques including UV-Vis spectrophotometry, fluorescence, emission spectrometry, atomic ab- 
sorption, pulse polarography, and neutron activation analysis. 

CH 521 Advanced Organic Chemistry. Preq: CH 223, 433 or 435. 3(3-0) F. Structure, 
stereochemistry and reactions of the various classes of hydrocarbons. The molecular orbital 

202 



treatment of bonding and reactivity of alkenes, the conformational interpretation of 
cycloalkene and cycloalkane reactivity, and the application of optical isomerism to reaction 
mechanisms. 

CH 523 Advanced Organic Chemistry II. Preq: CH 521. 3(3-0) S. Acid-base theory and 
mechanistic organic chemistry as applied to synthetically useful organic reactions. 

CH 525 Physical Methods in Organic Chemistry. Preq: CH 223, and 433 or 435. 3(3-0) S. 
Physical methods applied to solution of structural problems in organic chemistry. Emphasis 
on spectral methods including infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spec- 
trometry, electron paramagnetic resonance, x-ray and electron diffraction, and optical 
rotatory dispersion. 

CH 531 Chemical Thermodynamics. Preq: CH 433, MA 301. 3(3-0) F. Extension of 
elementary principles to treatment of ideal and real gases, ideal solutions, electrolytic solu- 
tions, galvanic cells, surface systems and irreversible processes. Introduction to statistical 
thermodynamics and the estimation of thermodynamic functions from spectroscopic data. 

CH 533 Chemical Kinetics. Preq: CH 433, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. Emphasis on experimental 
and mathematical techniques, elements of the kinetic theory, and theory of the transition 
state. Applications to gas reactions, reactions in solution and mechanism studies. (Offered S 
1977 and alt. years.) 

CH 535 Surface Phenomena. Preq: CH 433, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. Formulations of basic 
theories are presented with illustrations of their current applications. (Offered S 1978 and 
alt. years.) 

CH 537 Quantum Chemistry. Preq: MA 301, CH 435 or PY 407. 3(3-0) S. The elements of 
wave mechanics applied to stationary energy states and time dependent phenomena. Ap- 
plications of quantum theory to chemistry, particularly chemical bonds. 

CH 539 Colloid Chemistry. Preq: CH 220, 315 or 331 or CI. 3(2-3) S. Theories, basic prin- 
ciples, and fundamental concepts including preparation and behavior of sols, gels, emul- 
sions, foams, and aerosols and topics in areas of adsorption, Donnan equilibrium, dialysis, 
and small particle dynamics. Laboratory includes independent project studies in specialized 
areas. (Offered S 1977 and alt. years.) 

CH 545 Radiochemistry. Preq: CH 431 or PY 410. 3(2-3) S. Applications of radioactivity 
to chemistry and application of chemistry to radioactive elements, particularly tran- 
suranium elements and fission products. (Offered S 1978 and alt. years.) 

CH (TC) 562 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers — Bulk Properties. 3(3-0) F. (See 
textile chemistry, page 319.) 

Civil Engineering 

CE 201 Elements of Plane Surveying. Preq: Soph, standing. 3(2-3) F. Not for CE depart- 
ment majors. Theory and practice of plane surveying precision specifications, horizontal and 
vertical control, stadia surveys, area determinations, circular and compound curves, 
topographic mapping, solar and celestial observations, rural and urban land surveys. 

Rihani 

CE 202 Introduction to Civil Engineering. Preq: MA 201. 2(1-3) F,S. Computer solution 
of typical problems in each subject area of civil engineering. Ely, Smith 

CE 301 Engineering Surveying. Preq: Junior standing. 3(2-3) F,S. Principles of surveying 
and applications in planning, design and construction; including horizontal and vertical con- 
trol; topographic maps, photogrammetry and elements of geodesy. Babcock 

CE 305 Transportation Engineering I. Preq: CE 301. 4(3-2) F,S. Integrated approach to 
planning, designing operation of transportation systems. Engineering and economic aspects 
of basic transport modes, (including highway, rail, water and air facilities) are studied. 

Cribbins, Heimback, Rihani 

CE 325 Structural Analysis. Preq: ESM 301. 3(2-2) F.S.Sum. Stress analysis of statically 
determinate beams and framed structures under fixed and moving loads; analysis of dis- 
placements by methods of conjugate beam and virtual work; indeterminate structural 
analysis of both rigid frames and trusses by virtual work and by stiffness method. 

Havner,Tung 



203 



CE 326 Structural Engineering I. Preq: CE 325 4(3-2) F,S. Fundamental principles of 
elastic, inelastic and ultimate strength analysis and proportioning of structural members in 
metal, concrete and timber. 

CE 332 Materials of Construction. Preq: MAT 200. 3(2-3) F.S.Sum. Manufacture and 
properties of mineral and bituminous cements and mineral aggregates. Mechanical proper- 
ties of portland cement concrete, bituminous concrete, masonry units materials and timber 
products. Materials testing for research. Mullen 

CE 342 Soil Engineering I. Preq: CE 332; Coreq: ESM 301. 4(3-2) F,S. Soil identification, 
index properties, effective stress concepts, settlement analysis, evaluation of shear strength 
and bearing capacity, fundamentals of foundation selection and design. Kashef 

CE 365 Construction Engineering I. Preq: Jr. standing. 4(3-2) F,S. Construction opera- 
tions course emphasizing organization of construction industry; construction methods, 
equipment, productivity and safety; project planning; scheduling and control. Blessis, 
Nunnally 

CE 370 Elements of Environmental Hygiene. Preq: Soph, standing. 3(2-3) S. Environ- 
mental factors affecting human health and their evaluation and control. Topics include: 
water supplies; sewage disposal; swimming pool and refuse sanitation; insect and rodent con- 
trol; milk and food sanitation; the physical factors of noise, heat, illumination and ionizing 
radiation; housing; industrial hygiene; and environmental hygiene programs. Johnston 
CE 382 Hydraulics. Preq: ESM 200 4(3-3) F,S. Properties of fluid, laws of conservation of 
mass, momentum and energy; applications to the mechanics of flow through pipes and chan- 
nels; fluid measurements; theory of design and characteristics of hydraulic machines. 

Amein, Machemehl 

CE 383 Water Resources Engineering I. Preq: CE 382. 4(3-3) F,S. Application of natural 
science, physics and chemistry in the engineering of urban water and waste systems. Case 
studies illustrate applications and relationship of systems to management of environmental 
quality in urban areas. Amien, Malcolm 

CE 406 Transportation Engineering II. Preq: CE 305. 3(2-2) F,S. Urban transportation 
problems and design of modal interfaces such as airports, shopping centers, parking garages, 
port facilities and other multimodal terminals. Babcock, Rihani 

CE 425 Intermediate Structural Analysis. Preq: CE 325. 3(3-0) F,S. Rigorous treatment, 
at intermediate level, of indeterminate structural analysis. Energy principles, force and dis- 
placement methods, special topics. Havner, Mirza 
CE 427 Structural Engineering II. Preq: CE 326. 3(2-2) F,S. Basic concepts of structural 
design. Analysis and design of complete structural systems. Hulsey, Uyanik 

CE 428 Structural Design in Wood. Preq: CE 326. 3(2-2) F. Structural behavior of wood 
under loads; design of structural elements in wood; strength properties of wood fasteners; 
design projects with clear wood, plywood and glued-laminated wood. 
CE 433 Soil Engineering II. Preq: CE 342. 3(3-0) F,S. Lateral earth pressure theories and 
their application to analysis and design of slopes and retaining structures; ground water 
hydraulics; placement of fills; soil behavior in pavement systems, stabilization 
techniques. Wahls 

CE 450 Civil Engineering Design. Preq: One from: CE 406, 427, 443, or 484. 3(1-6) F,S. 
Integrated team approach to a major civil engineering project involving planning, design and 
analysis under realistic conditions including environmental factors. Babcock 

CE 460 Construction Engineering Project. Preq: CE 463, 466. 3(1-6) F,S. Planning, 
design, construction and management of a construction project. Blessis 

CE 463 Cost Analysis and Control. Preq: CE 365. 3(2-3) F,S. Cost engineering, project es- 
timating, bid procedures, construction cost analysis and control. Blessis, Nunnally 
CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting. Preq: Sr. standing. 3(3-0) S. Legal aspects of con- 
struction contract documents and specifications; owner-engineer-contractor relationships 
and responsibilities; bids and contract performance; labor laws. Blessis 
CE 466 Construction Engineering II. Preq: CE 326, 365. 3(2-3) F,S. Introduction to 
building systems construction emphasizing planning, analysis, design and construction of 
structural subsystems. Debruhl 

204 



CE 472 Elements of Air Quality Management. Preq: College level physics and sr. 
standing. 3(2-3) F. Pollution and community air quality management, including pollutant 
sources; effects on biological systems, materials, and the atmosphere; meteorological factors; 
air sampling; abatement and control techniques; air quality and emission standards; and 
legal, economic and administrative aspects. Shearer 

CE 484 Water Resources Engineering II. Preq: CE 383. 3(3-0) F,S. Occurrence, flow and 
control of natural and impounded waters. Case studies of storm drainage, flood control and 
stream sanitation illustrate the use of these principles in the management of river basin 
water resources. Malcom, Smallwood 

CE 486 Sanitary Engineering Measurements of Water Quality. Preq: Freshman 
chemistry and sr. standing in Engineering or Agriculture and Life Sciences. 3(2-3) S. In- 
troduction to elementary measurement and interpretations of pollutants in water and 
wastewater. Examination of the nature and character of municipal refuse. Staff 

CE (OY, MAS) 487 Physical Oceanography. 3(3-0) S. (See physical oceanography, page 
293.) 

CE 498 Special Problems in Civil Engineering. Preq: Sr. standing in CE or CEC. 1-3 
F,S. Directed reading in the literature of civil engineering, introduction to research 
methodology, seminar discussions, dealing with special civil engineering topics of current 
interest. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 507 Airphoto Analysis I. Preq: Sr. standing 3(2-3) S. Principles and concepts for engi- 
neering evaluation of aerial photographs, including analysis of soils and surface drainage 
characteristics. Wahls 

CE 514 Municipal Engineering Projects. Preq: Sr. standing in CE. 3(2-3) S. Special 
problems relating to public works, public utilities, urban planning and city engineer- 
ing. Babcock, Smallwood 

CE 515 Transportation Operations. Preq: CE 305. 3(3-0) F. Analysis of traffic and trans- 
portation engineering operations. Heimback, Rihani 

CE 516 Transportation Design. Preq: CE 305. 3(2-3) F. Geometric elements of traffic and 
transportation engineering design. Cribbins 

CE 517 Water Transportation. Preq: CE 305. 3(3-0) F. Planning, design, construction 
and operation of waterways, ports, harbors and related facilities. Feasibility of piers, ports 
and multipurpose river basin projects. Design of marine structures and civil works including 
locks, dams, harbors, ports and contractive and protective works. Cribbins 

CE 524 Analysis and Design of Masonry Structures. Coreq: CE 427. 3(3-0) F. Theory 
and design of masonry arches, culverts, dams, foundations and masonry walls subjected to 
lateral loads. Staff 

CE 525, 526 Matrix Structural Analysis I, II. Preq: (525), CE 425; (526), CE 326, 3(3-0) 
F.S. Matrix methods of structural analysis for digital computer solutions for general frames, 
trusses, and grids as well as general three dimensional trusses and frames. Inclusion of effects 
due to prestrain, temperature, elastic stability functions, joint deformations, and support 
settlements. Introduction to finite-element analysis of plane elasticity problems. Dean, 
Smith 

CE 531 Structural Models. Preq: CE 427. 3(2-3) S. Dimensional analysis and structural 
similitude, indirect and direct models, model materials and experimental techniques, in- 
dividual project in structural model analysis. Mirza, Zia 

CE 534 Plastic Analysis and Design. Preq: CE 427. 3(3-0) S. Theory of plastic behavior 
of steel structures; concept of design for ultimate load and the use of load factors. Analysis 
and design of components of steel frames including bracing and connections. Ely, Smith 

CE 536 Theory and Design of Prestressed Concrete. Preq: CE 427. 3(3-0) F. Principles 
and concepts of design in prestressed concrete including elastic and ultimate strength 
analyses for flexural, shear, bond and deflection. Principles of concordancy and linear 
transformation for indeterminate prestressed structures. Mirza, Zia 

CE (MAS, OY) 541 Gravity Wave Theory I. 3(3-0) S. (See marine sciences, page 267.) 

205 



CE 543 Hydraulics of Ground Water. Preq: CE 382 or 342 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Princi- 
ples of ground water hydraulics; theory of flow through idealized porous media; the flow net 
solution; seepage and well problems. Kashef 

CE 544 Foundation Engineering. Preq: CE 342. 3(3-0) S. Subsoil investigations; excava- 
tions; design of sheeting and bracing systems; control of water; footing, grillage and pile foun- 
dations; caisson and cofferdam methods of construction. Kashef. Langfelder 

CE 548 Engineering Properties of Soils I. Preq: CE 342. 3(2-3) F. Study of soil properties 
significant in earthwork engineering, including soil solids, basic physiochemical concepts, 
classification, identification, plasticity, permeability, capillarity and stabilization. 
Laboratory work includes classification, permeability and compaction tests. 

Kashef, Langfelder 

CE 549 Engineering Properties of Soils II. Preq: CE 548. 3(2-3) S. Continuation of CE 
548. Compressibility, stress-strain relations and shear strength theories for soil. Laboratory 
work includes consolidation and shear strength tests. Langfelder 

CE 551 Theory of Concrete Mixtures. Preq: CE 332. 3(3-0) F. Study in depth of portland 
cement concrete mixtures including types and properties of portland and special cements, 
mix design methods, fresh and hardened concretes, admixtures. Mullen 

CE 553 Asphalt and Bituminous Materials. Preq: CE 332. 3(2-3) S. Study in depth of 
asphalts and tars properties for use in waterproofing and bituminous materials. Theories of 
design of bituminous mixtures for construction and paving uses including types and proper- 
ties of asphalt cements, cutbacks, emulsions, blown asphalts and tars. Laboratory work 
required. Mullen 

CE 555 Highway and Airport Pavement Design. Preq: CE 406 or CE 443. 3(2-3) S. 
Theoretical analysis and design of highway and airport pavements with critical evaluation of 
current design practices. Staff 

CE (BAE, MB) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. Preq: MB 401 or equivalent 3(2-3) S. Fun- 
damental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry presented and related to problems of 
stream pollution, refuse disposal and biological treatment. Laboratory exercises present 
basic microbiological techniques and illustrate basic microbial aspects of waste 
disposal. Staff 

CE 573 Unit Operations and Processes in Waste Treatment. Preq: CE 486; Coreq: 
CE 571. 3(1-6) F. Unit operations and processes in water and wastes engineering, including 
sedimentation, thickening, chemical coagulation, vacuum filtration, carbon adsorption, 
biological treatment, and special projects. Galler 

CE (NE) 574 Environmental Consequences of Nuclear Power. Preq: CI. 3(3-0) S. Ex- 
amination of environmental consequences resulting from the siting, construction and opera- 
tion of nuclear power plants and the environmental consequences of alternatives to nuclear 
power. Smallwood 

CE 575 Civil Engineering Systems. Preq: MA 405. 3(3-0) S. Examination of civil 
engineering systems and their design optimization. Systems studied include water resources 
engineering, structural engineering, transportation engineering and construction. Galler 

CE 576 Atmospheric Pollution. Preq: Grad. or advanced undergrad. standing. 3(3-0) S. 
Topics include: pollutant sources; effects on man and other animals, vegetation, materials 
and visibility; meteorological factors; air sampling, control devices; air quality and emission 
standards; and legal, economic and administrative aspects. Shearer 

CE (BAE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management. 3(2-3) F. (See biological and 
agricultural engineering, page 193.) 

CE 580 Flow in Open Channels. Preq: CE 382. 3(3-0) F.Theory and application of flow in 
open channels, including dimensional analysis, momentum-energy principle, gradually 
varied flow, high-velocity flow, energy dissipators, spillways, waves, channel transitions and 
model studies. Amein 

CE (MAS) 581 Introduction to Oceanographic Engineering. Preq: CE 382. 3(3-0) S. 
Engineering aspects of physical oceanography. Propagation of waves theory, methods of wave 
forecasting and analysis of wave spectra. Application of physical oceanography to design of 
marine and coastal installations. Amein, Machemehl 



206 



CE 591, 592 Civil Engineering Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussions and reports. Staff 
CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects. 1-6 F,S. Special projects. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CE 571 Theory of Water and Waste Treatment. 3(3-0) F. Galler 

CE 572 Design of Water and Wastewater Facilities. 3(3-0) S. Smallwood 



Computer Science 

CSC 101 Introduction to Programming. 3(2-2) F,S. Understanding algorithms, programs 
and computer. Organization and characteristics of computers. Fundamental algorithms 
associated with computing. Data representation. Basic programming and program structure. 
Debugging and verification of programs. Computer solution of numerical and non-numerical 
problems using one or more programming languages. 

CSC 102 Programming Concepts. Preq: CSC 101. 3(3-0) F,S. The features available in 
higher-level programming languages. The student develops good programming habits by 
writing a variety of non-numerical application programs. Emphasis is on the global proper- 
ties of programs in a block-structured language with list and string manipulation facilities. 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I. Coreq: MA 102. 2(2-1) F,S. Introduction to a 
problem-oriented computer language (currently FORTRAN IV) for use in a problem solution 
using digital computers. Designed as a two-hour service course for scientifically oriented stu- 
dents, primarily in Engineering with programs slanted toward engineering applications. 

CSC 112 Basic Computer Organization and Assembly Language. Preq: CSC 101 or 111. 
3(3-0) F,S. Binary and hexadecimal number systems. Description of machine organization, 
including memory, addressing schemes, registers, and data channels. Internal representation 
of data and instructions. Machine language and the assembly process. Loading and execu- 
tion. Program relocation. Input and output using facilities of a supervisor program. In- 
terrupts and their priorities. Combining separately translated programs for execution. 

CSC 200 Introduction to Computers and Their Uses. (A student who has taken CSC 101 
or 111 may not receive credit.) 3(3-0) F,S. An introduction to electronic digital computers, in- 
cluding the parts of a computer, a step-by-step description of the processes which the com- 
puter goes through in performing its tasks, and description of several uses to which the com- 
puter is currently being put. Intended for non-technical students desiring knowledge of com- 
puter capabilities and limitations. 

CSC 251 Principles of Programming — Fortran. Preq: CSC 111 or 102.1(1-0) S. The 
programming language Fortran and its applications to numerical computation and file 
manipulation. Emphasis on features and restrictions which are unique to Fortran. Program- 
ming assignments which explore the language in depth (Grading S — NC). 
CSC 252 Principles of Programming — Cobol. Preq: CSC 101. 1(1-0) F,S. Introduction 
to the business-oriented programming language Cobol. Programming assignments cover 
general data processing, file maintenance and report generation. (Grading S — NC). 

CSC 253 Principles of Programming — Algol. Preq: CSC 102. 1(1-0) F. Algol 60 presen- 
ted as a theoretical construct and a practical programming language. Extensions to Algol 60. 
Programming problems in a variety of applications areas. (Grading S — NC). 
CSC 254 Principles of Programming — APL. Preq: MA 405. 1(1-0) S. Advanced 
programming concepts in APL and their application to a wide variety of computing 
problems. The APL reference language and locally available APL hardware representations. 
(Grading S-NC). 

CSC 255 Principles of Programming — Snobol. 1(1-0) F. The syntax and semantics of 
the symbol manipulation language Snobol 4. Applications of the language to programming 
problems in non-numeric areas. (Grading S-NC). 

CSC 301 Principles of Systems Programs. Preq: CSC 112. 3(3-0) S. Advanced topics in 
assembly language programming. Program relocatability. Definition, call and expansion of 
macros. Historical survey of development of operating systems. Definition of operating 
system components. Use of operating system facilities. 

207 



CSC 302 Introduction to Numerical Methods. Preq: CSC 101 or 111; Coreq: MA 301 or 
312. 3(3-0) F,S. Numerical computations with digital computers; floating point arithmetic 
and implications of round-off error. Algorithms and computer techniques for the numerical 
solution of problems in: function evaluation; zeros of functions; interpolation; numerical dif- 
ferentiation and integration; linear systems of equations; curve fitting; solutions of non- 
linear equations; numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations. 

CSC 311 Data Structures. Preq: CSC 102 and 112. 3(3-0) F,S. Fundamental algorithms 
associated with data structures. Topics are: linear lists including stacks, queues and deques; 
sequential and linked allocation of linear lists; circular lists, doubly-linked lists, arrays and 
orthogonal lists; trees including traversal of binary trees and binary representation of trees; 
lists and garbage collection; multilinked structures; dynamic storage allocation. 

CSC 312 Computer Organization and Logic. Preq: CSC 112, 322. 3(3-0) F,S. Application 
of Boolean algebra to combinational circuit design problems. Sequential circuits. Organiza- 
tion and functional design of simplified computer components such as the memory unit, the 
arithmetic and logic unit and input-output devices. Architecture of computing systems. 
Functional characteristics of I/O devices, data channels, interrupt and priority systems. 
Microprogram control. Hardware-software tradeoffs and firmware. 

CSC (E) 321 Computer Graphics. 3(2-2) S. (See engineering, general courses, page 232.) 

CSC 322 Applied Algebraic Structures. Preq: MA 405. 3(3-0) F,S. Naive set theory, or- 
der and equivalence relations, functions, partitions, operations and congruences. Boolean 
algebra, semi-group, group and graph theory. Logic of propositions, first order predicate 
calculus, models for an axiomatic theory. Some applications and examples of these algebraic 
structures selected from formal language description, data structures, file organization, in- 
formation retrieval, games, switching circuits, neural nets, sequential machines, artificial in- 
telligence, syntactic structure of arithmetic expressions and theory of algorithms. 

CSC 351 Principles of Programming — LISP. Preq:CSC 311. 1(1-0) F. The programm- 
ing language LISP and its application to the processing of general list structures, with 
emphasis on recursive programming. Assignments demonstrate the power and versatility of 
LISP. (Grading S-NC). 

CSC 401 Sorting and Searching. Preq: CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. Sorting and searching 

procedures and their implications for file structure design. On-line and batch processing 

systems. 

CSC 411 Introduction to Simulation. Preq: MA 312 and ST 371 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. 

Introduces simulation concepts and methodology to CSC and other students. Modeling and 

computational techniques, Monte Carlo methods and interactive simulation. Projects are 

developed in areas of student interest. 

CSC 412 Introduction to Computability, Language and Automata. Preq: CSC 322. 3(3- 
0) F,S. Sequential machines as abstractions of digital computers described by state- 
transition graphs. Sequential machine as language acceptors and as the finite control of a 
Turing machine. Chomsky classification of languages and machines. Universal Turing 
machines and the halting problem. Church's thesis. Recursive functions. Heuristic argument 
that a function is recursive if and only if it is Turing computable. The semi-group word 
problem and tree searching algorithm. Applications to artificial intelligence, perceptron 
simulation, game playing, syntactic analysis algorithms. 

CSC 421 Computer Systems for Management. Preq: CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. Management in- 
formation systems (MIS). The data base approach. Characteristics of successful systems and 
dimensions of system evolution and evaluation. Models versus modeling in MIS design. A 
model of information flow and its economics. Profitability and risk analysis in corporate 
financial systems. Production/inventory control through MIS. Operations research techni- 
ques for MIS development. Management's MIS consultant. The general purpose MIS. 
Human factors in design and implementation of the new company MIS. 

CSC (MA) 427 Introduction to Numerical Analysis I. Preq: MA 301 or 312 and 

programming language proficiency. 3(3-0) F. For undergraduate students in any department 
who wish to learn the theory and practice of computational procedures using a digital com- 
puter. Topics include: approximation of functions by interpolating polynomials; numerical 
differentiaton and integration; solution of systems of ordinary differential equations in- 



208 



eluding both initial valve and boundary value problem. Computer applications and 
techniques. 

CSC (MA) 428 Introduction to Numerical Analysis II. Preq: MA 405 and programming 
language proficiency. 3(3-0) S. For students who wish to learn computational procedures us- 
ing digital computers. Topics include: solution of linear and nonlinear equations; matrices 
and iegenvalue calculations; orthogonal polynomials and Gaussian quadrature; curve fitting 
and function approximation by least squares smoothing formulas; minimax approximations. 
[CSC (MA) 427 is not a prerequisite.] 

CSC 431 Information Retrieval. Preq: CSC 311. 3(3-0) S. Organization and retrieval of 
information in natural language form. Analysis of information content by statistical, syntac- 
tic and logical methods. Automatic clustering and statistical association methods. Dic- 
tionary construction and utilization. File organization and retrieval techniques for text 
processing systems. Evaluation of retrieval effectiveness. Applications to both document 
retrieval and question answering systems. 

CSC 432 Introduction to Digital Signal Processing. Preq: CSC 302, ST 371, and MA 
405. 3(2-2) S. Use of digital computers in the processing of analog signals. The uses of 
operational amplifiers in SAH, DAC, and ADC's and other data acquisition devices. The dis- 
crete Fourier transform, digital filters and other algorithms used in processing time series. 

CSC 462 Computing for the Social Sciences. Preq: ST 311 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. To ac- 
quaint the social scientist with the information processing capabilities of a computer. Exam- 
ples and problems from the social sciences. Topics include: a higher level programming 
language, procedures for accessing statistical packages and other library routines, and data 
management using disks and tapes. (CSC majors may not receive credit.) 

CSC 495 Special Topics in Computer Science. Preq: CI. 1-6 F,S. Consists of the following 
types of study: readings in the literature of computer science, introductory research projects, 
major computer programming projects, seminars, or new course development. Work may be 
done in any CSC area such as software, hardware utilization, programming languages, 
numerical methods or telecommunications. 

CSC 499 Undergraduate Research in Computer Science. Preq: CI. 1-6 F,S. Independent 
investigation of a research problem under faculty supervision. 

CSC 501 Design of Systems Programs. Preq: CSC 311, 312 (CSC 301 recommended). 
3(3-0) F. Review of batch process systems programs, their components, operating charac- 
teristics, user services and their limitations. Implementation techniques for parallel process- 
ing of input-output and interrupt handling. Overall structure of multiprogramming systems 
on multi-processor hardware configurations. Details on addressing techniques, core manage- 
ment, file system design and management, system accounting, and other user-related ser- 
vices. Traffic control, interprocess communication, design of system modules, and interfaces. 
System updating, documentation and operation. 

CSC 502 Computational Linguistics. Preq: CI. 3(3-0) F. Use of a symbol manipulation 
language (SNOBOL 4) in solving non-numeric problems. Study of generative grammars, in- 
cluding finite-state, context-free, context-sensitive, and transformational grammers. Syntac- 
tic analysis by computers: algorithms and existing analysis systems for English. Com- 
putational semantics. Information retrieval and question-answering systems. Open to CSC 
and other students. 

CSC 504 Application of Linguistic Techniques to Computer Problems. Preq: CSC 502. 
3(3-0) S. Semiotics and programming languages. Comparison of semantic theories. 
Representation, classification and interpretation of scenes and other multi-dimensional il- 
lustrations. Design of a formal language for describing two-dimensional geometric figures, 
such as flow charts, chemical structures and logic diagrams. Characterization of programm- 
ing languages according to the theory of transformational grammar. 

CSC 511 Artificial Intelligence. Preq: CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. (Odd-numbered years.) Defini- 
tion of heuristic versus algorithmic methods, rationale of heuristic approach, description of 
cognitive processes. Objectives of work in artificial intelligence, simulation of cognitive 
behavior. Heuristic programming techniques. Survey of examples from representative ap- 
plication areas. The mind-brain problem and the nature of intelligence. Individual projects. 



209 



CSC 512 Metaprograms. Preq: CSC 311. (CSC 412 recommended.) 3(3-0) S. The techni- 
ques used in the design and implementation of compilers. Introduction to formal grammars 
and relations concerning a grammar. Detailed study of algorithms for lexical scanners, top- 
down recognizers, bottom-up recognizers for simple precedence grammars, operator 
precedence grammars, higher order precedence grammars, and bounded-context grammars. 
Run-time storage organization for a compiler including symbol tables, internal forms for 
source programs, semantic routines, error recovery and diagnostics, code generation and op- 
timization, and interpreters. 

CSC 522 Formal Languages and Syntactic Analysis. Preq: CSC 412 (CSC 512 recom- 
mended). 3(3-0) F. Formal languages and their relation to automata: languages and their 
representation, grammars, finite automata and regular grammars context free grammars and 
pushdown automata, type grammars and Turing machines, the halting problem, context- 
sensitive grammars and linear bounded automata, and operations on languages. 

CSC (MA) 529 Numerical Analysis I. 3(3-0) F. (See mathematics, page 270.) 

CSC (MA) 530 Numerical Analysis II. 3(3-0) S. (See mathematics, page 270.) 

CSC 532 Artificial Intelligence II. Preq: CSC 511, a course in mathematical logic. 3(3-0) 
S. (even numbered years). Emphasizes patter recognition, theorem proving, game playing, 
learning and heuristic programming. Students assigned computer projects illustrating 
theoretical concepts. 

CSC (MA) 536 Theory of Sequential Machines. (See mathematics, page 270.) 

CSC (MA) 537 Theory of Computability. Preq: CSC 412 or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Ef- 
fective computability. Turing machines. Primitive recursive functions. The u operator, u- 
recursive functions. Godel numbering. Equivalence of Turing machines and u-recursion. Un- 
decidable predicates. Universal Turing Machines. Other formulations of the concept of effec- 
tive computability. 

CSC 542 Database Management. Preq: CSC 431. 3(3-0) F. The course will cover the fun- 
damentals of the area of database management. Basic topics will include: general architec- 
ture for database management systems, current data models such as network, relational, 
hierarchical; security and integrity; discussion of currently implemented systems. 

CSC (IE, OR) 562 Advanced Topics in Computer Simulation. Preq: ST 421 or 
equivalent or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Basic simulation methodology'; general principles of 
the Monte Carlo Method: random number generation, accuracy, variance reduction 
methods, classical applications in mathematics and physics; simulation of queuing systems; 
development of a research problem in depth where computer simulation is required 1) to 
provide insight through experientation with a model, 2) to provide approximate answers and 
practical solutions, and 3) to test the model and the solutions. 

CSC (MA) 582 Special Topics in Numerical Solution of Linear Algebraic Equations. 

Preq: MA 405 or equivalent and a knowledge of computer programming. 3(3-0) S. A 
mathematical and numerical investigation of direct iterative and semi-iterative methods for 
the solution of linear systems. Methods for calculating eigenvalues and eigenvector of 
matrices. 

CSC (MA) 583 Special Topics in the Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential 
Equations. 3(30) F. (See mathematics, page 270.) 

CSC (MA) 584 Special Topics in the Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equa- 
tions. 3(3-0) F. (See mathematics, page 270.) 

CSC (OR, MA) 585 Graph Theory. 3(3-0) F. (See operations research, page 287.) 

CSC 595 Special Topics. Preq: CI. 1-6 F,S. Topics of current interest in CSC not covered 
in existing courses. 

Crop Science 

CS 211 Crop Science. Preq: BS 100. 4(4-0) F,S. Fundamental morphological, 
physiological and reproductive features of crop plants and the management practices for 
economical production. Emery, Fike 

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory. Preq: or Coreq: Any CS course. 1 (0-2) F,S. (Can be 
210 



taken only once for credit.) Evaluates methods of identifying and dealing with the problems 
of growing and managing crop plants. Emery, Fike 

CS 295 Special Topics in Crop Science. Preq: CS 211 or BO 200. 1-6 F,S, Sum. To be used 
for intensive or extensive study of specific crop science principles or production practices. It 
may also serve as a means for presenting crop science topics of current interest to non-majors. 

Emery 

CS 312 Pastures and Forage Crop. Preqs: BS 100, SSC 200 recommended. 3(3-0) S. Pro- 
duction and preservation of the principal forage crops, with attention to the development and 
maintenance of pastures. Chamblee 

CS 315 Turf Management. Preq: BS 100. 3(2-2) S. Production, utilization, and manage- 
ment of turf grasses. The growth responses of different plant species to natural and imposed 
environmental factors. Interrelationships of climate, soil, biotic factors, and plants are ex- 
amined in the field, laboratory, and classroom. Gilbert 

CS (BO) 402 Economic Botany. Preq: BO 200. 3(2-3) S. Emphasis is on plants and 
human affairs. All phases of the interrelationships of the plant world and the life history in- 
cipient to modern human cultures. Includes plants and plant products, beneficial and 
harmful, that man has used as necessities of life, ameliorants contributing to his well-being, 
and as raw materials for industry. Ornamentals are excluded. Timothy 

CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop Production. Preq: BO 421. 2(2-0) F. The produc- 
tivity and quality of crops in relation to all environmental factors, including man. Disorders 
caused by physical and biotic environmental stresses and the role of these environmental fac- 
tors in normal crop development are emphasized. Utilization and manipulation of the en- 
vironment for the continued improvement of crops are discussed. Patterson 

CS 413 Plant Breeding. Preq: GN 411. 2(2-0) S. Discussion of reproductive systems of 
higher plants; the genetic basis for plant improvement and the selection, evaluation, and 
utilization of crop varieties. Emery 

CS 414 Weed Science. Preq: CH 220. 4(3-2) F. Introduction to weed science covering prin- 
ciples and practices of cultural, biological, and chemical control. Chemistry, properties and 
effects of herbicides on plants are studied. Weed identification and principles and practices 
of application jf herbicides and their safe use are covered. There are three parts of lecture 
content: introduction, history, fundamentals of weed growth, spread and control; a section 
on chemicul herbicides; and a section on weed control practices in crops and noncropland 
areas. Worsham 

CS (SSC) 462 Soil-Crop Management Systems. 3(2-3) S. (See soil science, page 314.) 

CS 490 Senior Seminar in Crop Science. Preq: Sr. standing. 1(1-0) S. The collection, 
organization, written preparation, and oral delivery of scientific information. Emery 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CS 511 Tobacco Technology. Preq: BO 421 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Special problems con- 
cerned with the tobacco crop. The latest research problems and findings dealing with this im- 
portant cash crop. Collins 

CS 513 Physiological Aspects of Crop Production. Preq: BO 421. 3(3-0) S. Emphasizes 
pertinent physiological processes associated with crops and crop management such as plant 
growth, maturation, respiration and photoperiodism. Relationship of the environment to 
maximum crop yields. (Offered S 76 and alt. years.) Fike 

CS (HS) 514 Principles and Methods in Weed Science. Preqs: CS 414 or equivalent. 3(2- 
2) S. The losses caused by the ecology of weeds, biological control, basic concepts of weed 
management, herbicide-crop relationships and herbicide development. Introduction to 
greenhouse and bioassay techniques and field research techniques. Monaco 

CS (GN, HS) 541 Plant Breeding Methods. Preqs: GN 506 and ST 511. 3(3-0) F. 
Methods of plant breeding as related to principles and concepts of inheritance. 

Henderson, Staff 

CS (GN, HS) 542 Plant Breeding Methods. Preq: CS (GN, HS) 541. 2(0-4) Sum. 
Laboratory and field study of the application of the various plant breeding techniques and 

211 



methods used in the improvement of economic plants. (Offerred Sum. 1976 and alt. 
years.) Caldwell 

CS (GN) 545 Origin and Evolution of Cultivated Plants. Preq: CS 541 or GN 540. 2(2-0) 
S. Discussion topics include: mankind as a potential cultivator; man's anatomy, physiology 
and alimentary needs; origins of cultivation; spread of agriculture in terms of various 
theories; interactions of crops and environments with reference to crop evolution; special at- 
tributes of cultigens; modern aspects of evolution breeding. (Offered S 1976 and alt. 
years.) Lee 

CS 591 Special Problems. Preq: CI. Credits Arranged. Crop science problems may be 
selected or assigned. Emphasis on review of recent and current research. Staff 



Design 

ARC 400 Intermediate Architectural Design (Series). Preq: DF 102. May not be taken 
more than six times. 6(0-9) F,S. Design investigation aimed at the development of an 
understanding of the major issues confronting the architect and at the expanding of prob- 
lem-solving abilities in architectural design. Students must complete four semesters to 
satisfy this requirement, selecting from a number of vertically organized workshop studios 
which offer on an optional basis a wide range of program emphases. 

DF 101, 102 Environmental Design I, II. Preq: (DF 102) 101. Available to School of 
Design students only; this restriction may be waived by Dean and Program Director. 6(0-9) 
F,S. Introduction to the design disciplines and programs of the School of Design. A studio 
course examining the techniques and attitudes for dealing with identification, solution and 
evaluation arising from the design of physical artifacts in the natural and man-made en- 
vironment. The acquisition of languages and skills appropriate to these studies. 

DF 285 Environmental Design Studio for General Undergraduates. Preq: Sophomore 
Standing. This course is not open to School of Design students. 3(0-6) F,S. A studio struc- 
tured investigation of participant-context relationships as they help to determine the design 
of physical objects. Work involves the construction of various perceptual and conceptual 
simulations and/or models. Course places major stress on self-discovery and development. 

DF 400 Advanced Design Studio. Preq: DF 102. Open only to School of Design Students 
— Restriction waived at discretion of Dean and Program Director. 6(0-9) F,S. Studio offering 
upper level undergraduates the opportunity to intensively study fundamental design issues 
(form, color, structure, proportion, scale etc.) in a studio mode. Course may be used to par- 
tially satisfy studio requirement in all undergraduate programs in school. 

DF 485 Design Studio for Non-Design Undergraduates. Preq: Junior Standing. Not 
open to School of Design Students. 3(0-6) F,S. The course in intended to enrich the un- 
dergraduate program of students desiring some contact with the "studio" course structure of 
the School of Design. Design problems will be addressed in the studio milieu; the content of 
the problems will be drawn as much as possible from each student's major field of un- 
dergraduate studies. 

DN 141 History of Design I. Open to University students on a space available basis. 3(3- 
0) F. A critical study of the related design fields from prehistoric to early Christian times with 
reference to the social, political and technological movements which affected their 
development. 

DN 142 History of Design II. Open to University students on a space-available basis. 3(3- 
0) S. A critical study of the related design fields from early Christian to modern times with 
refernce to the social, political and technological movements which affected their 
development. 

DN 221 Introduction to Environment and Behavior for Designers. Credit in both DC 
221/231 and DN 232 is not allowed. Students must concurrently enroll in DN 221 and 231. 
3(3-0) F,S. An introductory integration of behavioral and environmental information, 
emphasizing a basic understanding of human behavior, natural systems, and their relation to 
environmental design. Examined is the impact of people and their artifacts on natural 
systems, and the impact of natural systems on people and their artifacts. Humane, 
ecologically sound utilization of these relations is explored. 

212 



DN 222 Human Perception and Behavior for Designers. 3(3-0) S. Course examines the 
linkages among perception, cognition and behavior with a strong emphasis on the perceptual 
mechanisms of humans, especially the eyes and ears. Also deals with the cognitive organiza- 
tion of perceptual information, its relation to language, society and culture and isolated 
human behavior at the micro and macro levels. 

DN 231 Introduction to Environment and Behavior for Designers. (See DN 221). 

DN 232 Introduction to Natural Systems and the Built Environment. Credit in both 
DN 221/231 and DN 232 is not allowed. 3(3-0) F,S. This course is an introduction to natural 
systems and their integration into environmental design processes. Historical and present 
relationships between people and the physical environment are examined. Natural systems 
are analyzed as a foundation for environmental design decisions and ecologically sound 
habitation systems are explored. 

DN 251 Principles of Architectural Structures. 3(3-0) F,S. Development of the princi- 
ples of structural behavior. A survey of structural systems, both natural and man-made, with 
an emphasis on a qualitative examination of the forces, influences or purposes to which they 
respond. 

DN 252 Environmental Responses in Design. 3(3-0) S. An introductory study in form 
seen as a response between man and the natural environment. The morphological 
relationship between material properties and environmental energies and their dual impact 
on the shape of the built artifact is investigated. 

DN 253 Basic Environmental Systems. 3(2-2) F,S. Natural and man-made laws as ap- 
plied to buildings and their various applications to lighting, heating, cooling, ventilation, 
plumbing, vertical transporation and sound. 

DN 254 Architectural Materials and Construction Systems. 3(2-2) F,S. Development of 
the concept of building as an environmental control and response mechanism. A description 
of environmental and use factors upon which the science of building construction is based. 
An investigation of basic building materials, their properties, processes of production and 
principal systems of enclosure, consideration also given to economic factors and legal 
controls. 

DN 255 Contemporary Manufacturing Processes I. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to mass 
production processes and their infli?nces on design. Emphasis is placed on material search 
and process selection in relation to form, function, human factors, finishes and joining 
methods. An analysis of paper, wood and metal manufacturing processes utilized in the pro- 
duction of mass-produced products. 

DN 256 Contemporary Manufacturing Processes II. 3(3-0) S. Introduction to mass 
production processes and their influences on design. Emphasis is placed on material search 
and process selection in relation to form, function, human factors, finishes and joining 
methods. An analysis of plastics and rubber and their specific manufacturing processes 
utilized in the production of mass-produced products. 

DN 257 Landscape Materials and Construction I. 3(2-4) F. An option for those students 
wishing to concentrate on the use of materials in small scale physical design. The course will 
concentrate on the properties of materials in design and construction techniques. Exercises 
in design will stress the implementation and use of materials for particular situations. 

DN 258 Landscape Materials and Construction II. 3(2-4) S. A continuation of DN 257 
with an emphasis on material use and construction techniques; the development of construc- 
tion documents; project organization and control and professional office organization will 
also be covered. 

DN 261 Design Methods. 3(3-0) F. Descriptive, comparisons, and testing of methods 
available in design with emphasis on problem-solving techniques. 

DN 311, 312 Advanced Visual Laboratory I, IL Preq: DF 201, soph, standing. 2-4 F,S. 
Continuation, on an advanced level, of the activities encountered in Design Fundamentals 
that relate to the major design areas in the School of Design. Activities involve study of visual 
communication skills in areas of sculpture, life drawing, graphics, painting, photography. 
The student elects instructor and area(s) of activity. 

DN 349 Historic Architecture Research. Preq: DN 141/142. 3 F,S. Research and the 
recording of sites, monuments, buildings or artifacts of historical interest. 

213 



DN 351 Architectural Structures I. Preq: or Coreq: DN 251. 3(3-0) F. An introduction to 
forte svstems. quantitative treatment of equilibrium conditions; analysis of forces in trusses, 
frames and beams; behavior of materials: stress-strain diagrams, ductility, brittleness, 
creep; mechanics of areas; column behavior; stresses and deflection in beams. 
DN 352 Architectural Structures II. Preq: DN 351. 3(3-0) S. Selection of structural 
system and design of structural elements in wood, steel, concrete and aluminum. 
DN 411, 412 Advanced Visual Laboratory III, IV. Preq: DF 102, soph, standing. 2-4 
F,S. Continuation, on an advanced level, of the activities encountered in Design Fundamen- 
tals that relate to the major design areas in the School of Design. Activities involve study of 
visual communication skills in areas of sculpture, life drawing, graphics, painting, 
photography. The student elects instructor and area(s) of activity. 

DN 413 Geometry for Designers. Preq: DF 102. 3(2-3) F,S. An opportunity to explore and 
examine geometry and geometrization as applied to the various fields of physical design. 
Limited mathematical and drawing skills needed. 

DN 414 Color and Light Laboratory. Preq: DF 102. 3(2-2) F,S. A course dealing with the 
physical and perceptual nature of color. It will be one-third lecture, one-third studio and one- 
third discussion-seminar. Its purpose is to develop color awareness, sensitivity and skills in 
visual communication with color as a designer's tool. 

DN 415 Visual Design Materials and Processes I. Preq: DF 102. 3(2-2) F. Introduction 
to basic tools and materials of visual design, packaging, typography and layout. The course 
will acquaint the student with mass production of two- and three-dimensional visual designs, 
packages and display techniques. 

DN 416 Visual Design Materials and Processes II. Preq: DF 102. 3(2-2) S. Introduction 
to basic tools and materials of visual design, packaging, typography and layout. The course 
will acquaint the student with mass production of two- and three-dimensional visual designs, 
packages and display techniques. 

DN 421 Environmental Cognition for Designers. Preq: DN 221/231 or DN 222. 3(3-0) F. 
A basic model of cognitive processes is examined, providing a framework for a lengthy ex- 
ploration of cognitive imagery. This commences with body imagery and images of self, mov- 
ing from there to developmental images of home, school, neighborhood and city. Mature im- 
agery of similar things is studied, concluding with a model of the micro-genetic development 
of environmental imagery useful in design decision-making. 

DN 423 Spatial Cognition for Designers. Preq: DN 221/DN 231 or DN 222. 3(3-0) F. The 
history of the concept of space in the Western world is examined as a foundation from which 
to look at how humans cognize space. A childe developmental perspective is emphasized, but 
a model of spatial cognition in the adult is described. The relation of spatial to environmental 
cognition is treated. 

DN 424 Social Factors Analysis in Design. Preq: DN 221/231 or 222. 3(2-4) S. The course 
introduces the student to human analysis techniques which can be applied to landscape 
architectural design. Interaction theory, neighborhood theory, social design policy and user 
preference approaches will be presented. 

DN 430 Site Planning. Preq: DN 221/231 and GY 120/110 or GY 101/110 or SSC 205. 3(2- 
2) F,S. Introduction into the technical operations and environmental landscape controls on 
project scale developments. The course covers site analysis, road alignment, grading 
hydrologic control, sedementation control and related problems of land development. 
DN 431 Natural Environment Analysis. Preq: DN 221/231 or DN 232. 3(3-0) F. Course in 
the theory and methods of landscape description, assessment and analysis of natural en- 
vironments. Environmental science applications are described in relationship to land plann- 
ing and management. 

DN 432 Environmental Assessment and Design Field Workshop. Pseq: DN 221/231 or 
DN 232. 3 Sum. This summer field workshop is a hands-on experience concerned with the 
assessment of natural systems and their utilization in the active manipulation of the environ- 
mental setting. Experiments relating to alternative decentralized energy systems, energy 
conservation methods, and low-technology, ecologically sound site support systems will be 
designed and executed. 



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DN 441 Origins and Development of Contemporary Architecture. Preq: DN 141, 142 for 
Design students only. Others: Junior Standing. 3(3-0) F,S. A survey and critical examination 
of modern architecture from its origins in 19th century philosophy and technology to the 
most recent developments in world architecture. The work of significant architects are ex- 
plored through lectures and slide presentations. 

DN 443 Landscape History: From the Ice Age to the Present. Preq: DN 141, 142. 3(3-0) 
F. The landscape designer deals with a landscape that has been shaped by man for the past 
fifteen or so thousand years. What has been the nature of man's agency? How extensive have 
the changes he has wrought been? Course examines in depth the landscape impacts of 
agriculture, commerce and industry attempting to establish the context within which the 
landscape designer operates. 

DN 444 History of Landscape Architecture. Preq: DN 141, 142. 3(3-0) F. The history of 
man's deliberate and conscious attempts to design the landscape is examined, beginning 
with a view of the efforts and results of primitive man. Ancient, medieval and Renaissance 
work is examined in garden and urban design to set the stage for the explosion of profes- 
sional activity that followed. The work of Frederick Law Olmsted is examined in detail. 

DN 447 Architecture History Seminar. Preq: DN 141, 142. 3(3-0) F,S. Presentations and 
discussions of specific areas in architectural history and allied design fields. 

DN 451 Illumination. Preq: DN 253. 3(1-4) S. Design of illumination systems for interior 
space. Model simulation of alternative lighting schemes. 

DN 452 Climate Control Systems and Design. Preq: DN 253. 3(1-4) F. Mechanical and 
non-mechanical systems for heating, cooling, ventilating, interior of building with emphasis 
on energy conscious design. 

DN 453 The Systems Approach to Building. Preq: DN 254. 3(3-0) S. An examination of a 
totally integrated process of programming, designing, constructing and evaluating buildings 
or larger environmental units. The history of industrialized building and case studies of 
significant systems building efforst of recent years will be investigated. Included will be an 
assessment of the future potentials of the systems approach and the designer's role. 

DN 462 Predictive Techniques, Predesign Methods, and Programming. Preq: DN 261. 
3(3-0) S. Problem solving, research methods, programming, games, graph theory and their 
applications to design. 

DN 491 Special Seminar in Design. 1-3 F,S. Seminars on subjects of current interest in 
design which are presented by persons not part of the regular faculty. 

DN 492 Special Topics in Design. 1-3 F,S. Topics of current interest to the programs in 
the School of Design offered by faculty in the School. Courses offered under this number are 
normally used to develop new courses. 

DN 493 Mini-Course in Design. 1-2 F,S. Seminars, workshops and lectures which by 
nature of their subject matter, focus or method of instruction do not fit the semester model. 
DN 494 Internship in Design. Preq: Junior Standing. Approval of program director. Max. 
6 cr. hrs. 3-6 F.S. Supervised field experience in professional offices and organizations whose 
activities are related to the programs of the School of Design. 

DN 495 Independent Study in Design. Preq: Junior Standing. Max. 6 cr. hrs. Approval of 
program director and core chairman. 1-3 S,F. Special problems in various aspects of design 
developed under the direction of a faculty member on a tutorial basis. 
LAR 400 Intermediate Landscape Architecture Design (Series). Preq: DF 102. May not 
be taken more than six times. 6(0-9) F,S. This series of courses covers small scale design, ur- 
ban landscape architecture, public and institutional design. The problems of project 
organization, design and execution will be studied in each course. Students must complete 
four semesters to satisfy this requirement, selecting from a number of vertically organized 
workshop studios which offer on an optional basis a wide range of program emphases. 
PD 400 Intermediate Product Design (Series). Preq: DF 102. May not be taken more 
than six times. 6(0-9) F,S. This series of courses is concerned with various social/economic 
age groups, various forms and rates of production, and various natural and synthetic- 
materials. Students must complete four semesters to satisfy this requirement, selecting from 
a number of vertically organized workshop studios which offer on an optional basis a wide 
range of program emphases. 

215 



PVD 400 Intermediate Visual Design (Series). Preq: DF 102. May not be taken more 
than six times. 6(0-9) F,S. Investigations of visual environment through the agency of various 
materials and processes leading to professional competence. Students must complete four 
semesters to satisfy this requirement, selecting from a number of vertically organized 
workshop studios which offer on an optional basis a wide range of program emphases. 

Economics and Business 

(Also see Accounting.) 

EB 201 Economics I. 3(3-0) F,S. Development of the modern economy and the history of 
economic thought to help understand economic problems. The market system as a means of 
cooperation and as facilitator of individual choice and efficiency in resource use. Inflation, 
employment, and growth in the national economy and their management by fiscal and 
monetary policies. Economic theories are presented to clarify policy issues and empirically 
resolvable controversies. Staff 

EB 202 Economics II. Preq: EB 201. 3(3-0) F,S. Analysis of problems of contemporary 
national and international economics. Topics include the public economy, the financial 
system, industrial organization, pricing of factors of production, international trade, 
economic growth and development, and comparative economic systems. Staff 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture. Preq: MA 111. 3(3-0) F,S. The functioning of the 
agricultural economy including the allocation of resources in agricultural production, 
relationships between agriculture and other segments of the economy, and current problems 
within the agricultural sector. Staff 

EB 301 Production and Prices. Preq: MA 112 and EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. The 
functioning of the market economy. The role of prices in determining the allocation of 
resources, the functioning of the firm in the economy, and forces governing the production of 
economic goods. Staff 

EB 302 Aggregate Economic Analysis: Theory and Policy. Preq: EB 201 and MA 112. 
3(3-0) F,S. Factors determining the national income. Relates the economic behavior of 
households, business firms and government to the determination of total output, employ- 
ment, the price level and other aggregate economic variables. Problems of public policy- 
making in achieving full employment and a stable price level. Staff 

EB 303 Farm Management. Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(2-2) F,S. Basic economic principles 
including the use of budgeting, linear programming, systems analysis and other techniques 
in determining what, how and how much to produce under various economic conditions. 

Neuman 

EB 304 Financial Institutions. Preq: EB 201. 3(3-0) F,S. The flow-of-funds among the 
principal financial institutions in the American economy; the behavior of the money and 
capital markets; and the allocation of savings flows into investment expenditures. 

Jones, Poindexter, Lapp 

EB 307 Business Law I. Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. The main principles of law af- 
fecting the conduct of trade as it is affected by contracts, agency and property ownership. 
Major areas include criminal law, tort law, contract, agency, real and personal property, wills 
and estates. Holcomb 

EB 308 Business Law II. Preq: EB 307. 3(3-0) F,S. The main principles of law affecting 
the conduct of trade and industry including real and personal property, mortgages, in- 
surance, wills and estates, sales, business organizations and bankruptcy. Pinna 

EB 310 Economics of the Firm. Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. The economic setting 
within which the business firm makes decisions and an application of economic analysis to 
these decisions. Economics in managerial decision making. Harrell, Holthausen, Loeb 

EB 311 Agricultural Markets. Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) S. The agricultural marketing 
system and the current economic forces affecting its structure and efficiency; decision mak- 
ing by agricultural business firms including integration and interfirm relationships; effects of 
monopoly in marketing relative to government policies of control. Visits to marketing firms 
and practical problems illustrating firm decisions. A laboratory period in alternate weeks 
beginning with the second full week of classes. Students examine individually the marketing 
problems associated with the commodity of their choice. Staff 

216 



EB 313 Marketing Methods. Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. The functions of marketing 
for goods and services in the consumer, industrial and government markets. Emphasis on the 
role of marketing in our free exchange economic system. Areas studied are the activities of 
market research, advertising, pricing, channels of distribution, agricultural marketing, inter- 
national marketing, and the marketing of services. "Consumerism," its causes and its 
probable future. Leonard 

EB 325 Industrial Management. Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. Principles of manage- 
ment and the management process within the industrial organization. The relation of the 
financial, marketing, organization, and communication systems to the operations function. 
Quantitative decision methods for operations planning, organizing, and control. The student 
manages the operations system of a firm in a simulated environment. Loeb 

EB 326 Personnel Management. Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. The scientific manage- 
ment of manpower from the viewpoint of the supervisor and the personnel specialists; a study 
of personnel policy and a review of the scientific techniques regarding the specific problems 
of employment, training, promotion, transfer, health and safety, employee service and joint 
relations. Clark, Wessels 

EB 332 Industrial Relations. Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. The nature and functions of 
collective bargaining. The objectives and tactics of both labor and management within 
public policy guidelines. An examination of labor contracts and their implications for labor 
and management. Emphasis of the impact of change, economic and technological. Fearn 

EB (ST) 350 Economics and Business Statistics. Preq: MA 112, EB 201 and 202 or 

equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. An introduction of statistical application to economics and business 
problems. Included are such topics as probability, sampling, statistical estimation, in- 
ference, index numbers and linear regression. Wilson, T. Johnson 

EB (HI) 370 The Rise of Industrialism. Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F.S. The pattern of 
historical development of modern industrial economy. Capitalism origins in 16th century 
England are related to succeeding developments in the overseas colonial empire and in other 
areas influenced by that development. Sylla 

EB (HI) 371 Evolution of the American Economy. Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F.S. Ad- 
vances of modern industrialization are related to the development of America. Contemporary 
problems and issues are analyzed with reference to their origins in the historical growth of the 
economy. Sylla 

EB 401 Economic Analysis for Nonmajors. Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. Intermediate 
economic theory of firm, household and market behavior primarily for graduate students 
desiring an economics minor at the master's level. Students with adequate background in 
economics and mathematics elect EB 501 instead. Topics include demand, production and 
cost theory, market equilibrium under competitive and non-competitive conditions, an in- 
troduction to input-output and general equilibrium theory, the spatial arrangement of 
economic activity and problems of economic efficiency. Grennes 

EB 410 Public Finance. Preq: EB 301. 3(3-0) F. A micro-economic analysis of the 
rationale for public expenditure and taxation. Topics include externalities, pollution and 
public policy, income redistribution and public welfare, public goods, collective choice and 
political institutions, public budgeting techniques and cost-benefit analysis, taxation and 
tax policy, state-local finance and fiscal federalism. Hyman, Knoeber 

EB 413 Competition, Monopoly and Public Policy. Preq: EB 301. 3(3-0) S. The effect of 
modern industrial structure on competitive behavior and performance, considering theories 
of contemporary price and workable competition. Evaluation of the legislative content, 
judicial interpretation and economic effects of the anti-trust laws. Erickson. Flath 

EB 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance. Preq: EB 303 or 310. 3(2-2) F. The earnings, market 
and cost approaches to real estate valuation with practice in the application of current ap- 
praisal procedures to rural property. Criteria and techniques for the financial management of 
a farm. Topics include existing sources and terms of capital, forms of business organization 
and methods of credit analysis. Neuman 

EB 420 Corporation Finance. Preq: EB 201 or 212, and ACC 260. 3(3-0) F.S. The prin- 
cipal areas of managerial finance including the techniques necessary to make decisions. At- 
tempts to integrate finance and other functional areas that a corporation must deal with. 

217 



Relevant macro economics topics. Cases and problems dealing with important topics are 
analyzed and discussed. Jones 

EB 422 Investments and Portfolio Management. Preq: EB 201 and 350 or ST 311. 3(3-0) 
F.S. Analysis of investment process problems including security analysis and emphasizing 
porfolio management. Brief explanation of traditional thinking and an examination of the 
modern revolution in investments which emphasizes a quantitative framework to achieve the 
goal of performance. After describing what an individual investor faces in making decisions, 
the question of professional management as an alternative is viewed critically. Jones 

EB 430 Agricultural Price Analysis. Preq: EB 301. 3(3-0) F. Principles of price forma- 
tion; the role of price in the determination of economic activity; the interaction of cash and 
future prices for agricultural commodities; methods of price analysis, construction of index 
numbers, analysis of time series data including the estimation of trend and seasonal varia- 
tions in prices. Gardner, Schrimper 

EB 431 Labor Economics. Preq: EB 301. 3(3-0) F,S. An economic approach to the labor 
market and its problems including unemployment and the determination of wages, hours 
and working conditions under various labor market structures. The economic effects of trade 
unions. Introduction to human capital theory. Clark, Fearn 

EB 435 Urban Economics. Preq: EB 301. 3(3-0) S. Application of land use and location 
theory to urban structure and centralized economic activity. Analysis of trends in urbaniza- 
tion and suburbanization. Urban poverty, housing, transportation, pollution and financial 
problems. Diamond 

EB 436 Environmental Economics. Preq: EB 301. 3(3-0) S. The usefulness of economics 
in understanding pollution, congestion, conservation and other environmental problems. 
Relevant economic tools such as pricing schemes, abatement cost curves, damage functions 
and benefit-cost analysis. Pollution taxes, regulations and subsidies considered in designing 
alterations in the incentive system. Public policy alternatives examined in the context of 
non-market decision making. Carlson 

EB 442 Evolution of Economic Ideas. Preq: EB 202 or 212. 3(3-0) F. The general develop- 
ment of economic ideas from ancient times through Keynes. Emphasis on the classical school 
and developments thereafter. Though chronological in presentation, the course will review 
the evolution of economic ideas in the context of the changes in technology and the increasing 
complexity of economic activity. Turner 

EB 448 International Economics. Preq: EB 301. 3(3-0) F,S. Trade, investment, monetary 
relations and certain aspects of economic development. Emphasis on analytical and policy 
approaches with some study of specific international organizations. Ball 

EB 451 Introduction to Econometrics. Preq: EB 301, 302 and 350 or ST 311. 3(3-0) F. The 
measurement, specification, estimation and interpretation of functional relationships 
through single equation least-square techniques. Simple and multiple regression, curvilinear 
regression and various transformations will be used to measure: demand, cost, production, 
consumption and investment relationships. Wilson 

EB 475 Comparative Economic Systems Preq: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. Concentration 
on capitalist or market economies which will be contrasted with collectivist types of systems. 
Emphasis on the Soviet economy. Turner 

EB (TX) 482 Sales Management for Textiles 3(3-0) S. (See textile technology, page 
000.) 

EB 490, 491 Senior Seminars in Economics. Preq: EB 301 and 302 and 350 or ST 311 

(plus two courses from list of restricted EB electives). 3(3-0) F,S. The terminal EB courses in 
which undergraduates are assisted in summarizing training, and improving capacity to 
recognze problems and select logically consistent means of solving problems. This is done on 
a small-group and individual basis. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EB 501 Price Theory. Preq: MA 112 and EB 301. 3(3-0) F,S. An intensive analysis of the 
determination of prices and of market behavior, including demand, cost and production, 
pricing under competitive conditions and pricing under monopoly and other imperfectly 
competitive conditions. Sylla, Chappell, Ball, Holthausen 

218 



EB 502 Income and Employment Theory. Preq: MA 1 12 and KB 301 and 302. 3(3-0) F,S. 
The methods and concepts of national income analysis with particular reference to the role of 
fiscal and monetary policy in maintaining full employment without inflation. 

Poindexter, Lapp 

EB (RRA) 503 Economics of Recreation. 3(3-0) F. (See recreation resources administra- 
tion, page 307.) 

EB 515 Water Resources Economics. Preq: EB 401 recommended. 3(3-0) F. Applying 
economic principles to water resources allocation. Attention to how to effect maximum 
economic efficiency in the use of a resource that is no longer a free good, under the considera- 
tion of the goals of the public and private sectors of the enterprise economy. Both economic 
and political consequences of decision-making. Seagraves 

EB 520 The Theory of Finance. Preq: EB 301 or 401 3(3-0) F. An analysis of the current 
state of the related financial areas of portfolio theory, the theory of capital markets, and the 
theory of firm finance. Emphasis is placed upon the optimum financial choice by both the 
firm and the individual. Basic topics include decision making under uncertainty, firm invest 
ment and financing decisions, portfolio theory and analysis, capital asset pricing models, and 
the theory of capital market equilibrium. Jones 

EB 521 Markets and Trade. Preq: EB .301 or 401 3(3-0) F. Emphasizes the space, form 
and time dimensions of market price and the location and product combination decisions of 
firms. Consideration to the ways in which non-price factors and public-policy choices in- 
fluence firm behavior and the efficiency of marketing systems. Application of these models to 
agricultural, industrial and public-service questions, including the relationship between 
resource availability and the spatial arrangement of economic activity. King 

EB 523 Planning Farm and Area Adjustments. Preq: EB 310, 303, or 401. 3(2-2) S. The 
application of economic principles to producion problems on typical farms in the state; 
methods and techniques of economic analysis of the farm business; application of research 
findings to production decisions; development of area agricultural programs. Liner 

EB 525 Management Policy and Decision Making. Preq: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) F. 
Modern management processes used in making top-level policies and decisions; an evalua- 
tion of economic, social and institutional pressures and of the economic and noneconomic 
motivations, which impinge upon the individual and the organization. The problem of coor- 
dinating the objectives and the mechanics of management. Erickson, Flath 
EB 533 Agricultural Policy. Preq: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) S. The agricultural policy and ac- 
tion programs of the federal government as regards both input supply and commodities, 
analysis of objectives, principal means and observable results as regards resource use and in- 
come distribution within agriculture, and between agriculture and the rest of the economy. 
Appraisal of alternative policy proposal effects on domestic and foreign consumption. 

Mangum 

EB 535 Social Science Concepts in Managerial Processes. Preq: Six hours KB. 3(3-0) S. 

Interrelationships among economic concepts and social sciences concepts in managerial 
processes of clarifying goals, discovering alternatives and choosing courses of action. Cases 
used to compare contributions of theoretical concepts from economics, political science, 
social psychology, sociology and management science to managerial processes. Theoretical 
concepts are drawn from readings in the various disciplines. Staff 

EB 540 Economic Development. Preq: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) F. An examination of the 
problems encountered in promoting regional and national economic development. Con 
sideration is given to the structural changes required for raising standards of living. Some 
basic principles of economics are applied to suggest ways of achieving development goals. 
Topics include planning strategies, policies and external assistance. Olsen 

EB 550 Mathematical Models in Economics. Preq: EB 301. 302, MA 212 and MA 105 

recommended but not required 3(3-0) F. Formal properties of economic models. The theory 
of individual economic units as a special case in the theory of inductive behavior. 
Mathematical discussion of the theories of the consumer and of the firm and welfare 
economics shows the relevance of constrained maxima and minima, set theory, partially and 
simply ordered systems, probability theory and game theory to economics. Stafl 

EB 551 Agricultural Production Economics. Preqs: MA 112 and EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) F. 

219 



An economic analysis of agricultural production including: production functions, cost func- 
tions, programming and decision-making principles. Application of these principles to farm 
and regional resources allocation and to the distribution of income to and within 
agriculture. Perrin 

EB 555 Linear Programming. Preqs: MA 231 or 405 and EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) F. Recent 
developments in the theory of production, allocation and organization; optimal combination 
of integrated productive processes within the firm; applications in the economics of industry 
and of agriculture. Staff 

EB (ST) 561 Intermediate Econometrics. Preqs: EB 501 and ST 513. 3(3-0) S. 
Emphasizes the formalization of economic hypotheses into testable relationships and the ap- 
plication of appropriate statistical techniques with attention to procedures applicable for 
single equation stochastic models expressing microeconomic and macroeconomic 
relationships. Statistical considerations that are relevant in working with time series and 
cross-sectional data in economic investigations. Survey of simultaneous equation models and 
the available estimation techniques. P. Johnson, T. Johnson 

EB 570 Analysis of American Economic History. Preq: EB (HI) 371 or grad. standing. 
3(3-0) S. Stresses the application of economic analysis to the formulation and testing of 
hypotheses concerning economic growth and development in the historical context. Problems 
analyzed drawn primarily from American economic history. Sylla 

EB (SOC) 574 The Economics of Population. Preq: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) S. Pre- 
Malthusian thought through contemporary population theories. Introduction to data 
sources, statistical tools and methodology for economic analysis in demography. There 
follows an intensive treatment of microeconomic models of fertility. In macroeconomics 
economic demographic models are examined and implications for public policy are 
developed. Underpopulation, overpopulation, optimum growth rate and incentive 
schemes. El-Kammash 

EB (TX) 585 Market Research in Textiles. 3(3-0) S. (See textile technology, page 320.) 

EB 590 Special Economics Topics. Preq: CI. Maximum 6. An examination of current 
problems on a lecture-discussion basis. Course content varies as changing conditions require 
new approaches to deal with emerging problems. Staff 

EB 598 Topical Problems in Economics. Preq: CI. 1-6. An investigation of topics of par- 
ticular interest to advanced students under faculty direction on a tutorial basis. Credits and 
content vary with student needs. Staff 

Education 

ED 100 Introduction to Industrial Education. 2(2-0) F. The framework of vocational 
education as it relates to the historical and legislative development, programs and purposes 
in industrial and technical education. Emphasis upon the current status of industrial and 
technical education in the nation, state and community. Program visitations and 
observations. Parker 

ED 101 Orientation. 0(1-0) F. New freshmen and transfer students (Math Science Educa- 
tion) are required to attend one hour per week during the fall semester. Activities help es- 
tablish good study habits and adjust to university life. Staff 

ED 102 Objectives in Agricultural Education. 1(1-0) F,S. Helps understand the purpose 
of agricultural education at North Carolina State. Also, develops an understanding of pur- 
poses of vocational agriculture and other programs of education in agriculture. Clary 

ED 203 Introduction to Teaching Mathematics and Science. 3(2-3) F,S. For prospective 
teachers of mathematics/science at the secondary school level. Emphasis on different modes 
of instruction and instructonal strategies. Each prospective teacher designs and teaches a 
lesson to students in the school at which he is a teacher assistant. (Offered S only for science 
education majors.) Simpson, Watson 

ED 205 Introduction to Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences. 3(2-3) F,S. For 
prospective teachers in the school curricular areas of social studies, English, speech, and 
modern languages. Emphasis on differing aspects and procedures of instruction and an 
analysis of the competencies required of teachers. Lab. observation and work with children 

220 



and youth in a variety of educational settings, including an extended period in one curricula 
area. Parramore, Staff 

ED 242 Introduction to Teaching Industrial Arts. Preq: Nine semester hours in in- 
dustrial arts. 3(4-2). S. To provide in-school experience for sophomore students. This will 
consist of observation, instructing individual students and small groups or providing aid to 
the local teachers in laboratory management and maintenance. Lecture and discussion will 
correlate these activities with teaching theory and practice. Staff 

ED (PHI) 304 Philosophy of Education. 3(3-0) F,S. (See philosophy, page 288.) 

ED 305 Analysis of Technical Education Programs and Course Construction. Preq: 
ED 100 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Selecting and analyzing suitable teaching activities and 
arranging such material into a functional instructional order. Instructional units prepared 
will be based on an analysis of a technical occupation or activity. A detailed course of study 
will be prepared. Shore 

ED 313 Contemporary Vocational Agriculture. 3(3-0) F,S. The contemporary program 
is examined in relation to changing and expanding career opportunities in agricultural 
education. The continuing adjustment of the program objectives, curriculum organization, 
content of courses, teaching practices, instructional resources and evaluation emphasis in 
modern programs in vocational agriculture. Prerequisite for student teaching in agricultural 
education. Clary 

ED (SOC) 318 Introduction to the Sociology of Education. 3(3-0) F. (See sociology, 
page 310.) 

ED 327 History and Philosophy of Industrial and Technical Education. Preq: ED 100. 
3(3-0) F. Place, function and changing concepts of industrial and technical education in 
America. Economic, sociological and psychological aspects. Parker, Shore 

ED 344 School and Society. Preq: Jr. or sr. standing. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. The inter- 
relationship between the school and other institutions, values, and patterns of thought in 
American society. Beezer, Ivie 

ED 362 Curriculum and Methods in Industrial Arts. Preq: ED 344, PSY 304. 4(3-2). S. 
Study of philosophy and objectives for industrial arts education; design and development of 
ucrriculum models; comparative teaching methodologies and evaluation. Young 

ED 405 Industrial and Technical Education Shop and Laboratory Planning. Preq: Sr. 
standing, six hours of drawing and design. 3(3-0) F. Principles and techniques of planning 
and organizing shop and laboratory facilities. Problems of locating and equipping vocational 
schools; the planning and layout of shops and related technology laboratories and 
classrooms. Individual and group assignments on planning and layout of post-secondary 
school buildings. Staff 

ED 411 Student Teaching in Agriculture. Preq: ED 313, 344, PSY 304; senior standing, 
admission to teacher education. 8(2-15). F.S. During student teaching, prospective teachers 
develop skills and techniques involved in teaching vocational agriculture. Each student 
spends about 9 weeks full-time in a public school. In addition to teaching classes, the student 
teacher is expected to become familiar with the total program of the school and to participate 
in as many school activities as possible. Bryant. Miller 

ED 412 Teaching Adults. Preq: Admission to student teaching semester (ED 102 and 
313). 2(2-0). F.S. Principles of effective teaching applied to adults. Experience in organizing 
and conducting groups for discussion of local problems. Bryant, Miller 

ED 413 Planning Educational Programs. Preq: Admission to student teaching semester 
(ED 102 and 313). 2(2-0). F.S. Principles of program planning applied to educational 
programs in agriculture. Resources needed for adequate planning. Field work in planning 
programs. Bryant, Miller 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance. Preq: ED 344. 3(3-0) F.S. An overview of philosophies 
and principles of guidance services and of the classroom teacher's role in helping the school to 
realize the goals of developmental guidance programs. Topics include: philosophy, history 
and models of guidance, principles of counseling, accumulation and use of appraisal and in- 
formation data, career planning, and placement. Staff 
ED 421 Principles and Practices in Industrial Cooperative Training. Preq: ED 327. 

221 



344, 305. 3(3-0). F. Consideration of the concepts and principles, aims and objectives, 
developments, operation and evaluation of the industrial cooperative training program in the 
area of vocational education. Shore, Smith 

ED 422 Methods of Teaching Vocational Industrial/Technical Education. Preq: ED 
327, 305. 3(3-0). F,S,Sum. Study of effective methods and techniques of teaching industrial 
subjects. The course includes competencies needed by successful teachers and how to acquire 
and use them. Emphasis is given to the preparation of lesson plans, methods and techniques 
in the presentation of lessons, use of teaching aids and materials, class organization, shop 
safety, and evaluation. Smith 

ED 423 Methods and Materials in Teaching Modern Foreign Languages. Preq: ED 
205, 344, PSY 304; Coreq: ED 424, senior standing, admission to teacher education. 5(4-2). A 
study of the methods of teaching modern languages including the use of instructional media. 

Girardi 

424 Student Teaching in Modern Foreign Languages. Preq: ED 205, 344, PSY 304; 
Coreq: ED 423, senior standing, admission to teacher education. 8(2-15). S. Provides the 
prospective teacher of French or Spanish an opportunity to develop and practice the com- 
petencies essential for language teaching during 10-week practicum of full-time teaching in a 
selected off-campus center. Girardi 

ED 428 Organization of Related Study Materials in Vocational Education. Preq: ED 
327, 344. 3(3-0). S. The principles of selecting, preparing, and organizing related instruc- 
tional materials for trade preparatory and industrial cooperative training classes. 

Shore, Smith 

ED 440 Vocational Education. Preq: ED 444, PSY 304. 2(2-0) F. Comprehensive study of 
vocational education of less than college grade provided for through federal legislation and an 
evaluation of program effectiveness. Detailed study of the North Carolina Plan. Staff 

ED 444 Student Teaching in Vocational Industrial/Technical Education Preq: ED 344, 
PSY 304; senior standing, admission to teacher education. 8(2-15) F,S. Provides prospective 
teachers an opportunity to acquire experience in the techniques and skills involved in 
teaching vocational industrial/technical education curricula. Students will devote the 
semester to full-time off-campus teaching in selected schools. In addition to acquiring com- 
petencies essential for teaching vocational industrial/technical subjects, the student teacher 
will have an opportunity to become familiar with the total operation of a school program and 
with cooperating industries in the community. Smith 

ED 450 Methods and Materials in Teaching English. Preq: ED 205, 344, PSY 304; senior 
standing and admission to teacher education with a major in English. 3(3-0) F.S. A study of 
the purposes, curricula, materials, and methods of teaching literature and the skills of 
reading, writing, speaking, and listening in secondary schools, combined with opportunity for 
application and practice based on this study. Betts, Walters 

ED 451 Teaching Secondary School Reading. Preq: Admission to teacher certification 
program. 2(2-0) F,S. The nature of the reading process and principles, methods and 
materials for the development of effective reading attitudes and skills as applied both to 
developmental and remedial programs. Betts, Walters 

ED 454 Student Teaching in English. Preq: ED 205, 344, PSY 304, sr. standing, admis- 
sion to teacher education with a 2.1 overall average and 2.2 in English. 8 F,S. Provides the 
prospective teacher with experience in the techniques and skills involved in teaching 
English. Each student during the senior year will spend 10 weeks in a selected off-campus 
center. In addition to acquiring teaching competencies, the student teacher may become 
familiar with the total school program and may participate in as many school and com- 
munity activities as time permits. Betts, Walters 
ED 457 Organization and Management of Youth Club Activities. Preq: Jr. standing. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A study of the history and purposes of organized young adult activities in 
education. Emphasis upon organization and management of activities to prepare future 
teachers as competent advisers to the young adult groups in the school setting. Parker 

ED 460 Methods and Materials in Teaching Social Studies. Preqs: ED 205, 344, PSY 
304, sr. standing and admission to teacher education with a major in either history, sociology. 



222 



politics, or economics. 4(3-1) F,S. A study of the purposes, methods, materials, curricula and 
evaluation practices appropriate for teachers of social studies at the secondary level. 

Harper 

ED 464 Student Teaching in Social Studies. Preq: ED 205, 344, PSY 304; senior 
standing, admission to teacher education; Coreq: ED 460. 8(2-15). F.S. This course provides 
the prospective teacher an opportunity to acquire practical experience in using skills and 
techniques in teaching social studies in secondary schools. Each student during the senior 
year will spend eight weeks in a selected off-campus center. The student will demonstrate 
competencies essential for teaching social studies, become familiar with the total school 
program and participate in as many school and community activities as time will permit. 

Harper 

ED 470 Methods of Teaching Mathematics. Preq: Admission to teacher education. 3(3-0) 
F,S. A study of the purposes, methods, materials, curricula and evaluation practices appro- 
priate for teachers of mathematics at the secondary level. Kolb, Speece, Waters, Watson 

ED 471 Student Teaching in Mathematics. Preq: ED 203, 344, PSY 304, sr. standing, ad- 
mission to teacher education; Coreq: ED 470, 472. 8(2-15) F,S. Provides the prospective 
teacher with an opportunity to get experience in the skills and the techniques involved in 
teaching mathematics. Each student during the senior year will spend 10 weeks off-campus 
in a selected center. In addition to acquiring teaching competencies, the student teachers 
may become familiar with the total school program and may participate in as many com- 
munity activities as time permits. Kolb, Speece, Waters, Watson 

ED 472 Developing and Selecting Teaching Materials in Mathematics. Preq: Admis- 
sion to teacher education. Coreq: ED 470, 471. 2(0-6) F,S. Developing and selecting teaching 
material to effect new and changing concepts of the content and emphasis in high school 
mathematics. Course follows the class discussion and demonstration pattern. Study of latest 
instructional materials and devising materials and aids for increasing the effectiveness of the 
content and instruction. Kolb, Speece, Waters, Watson 

ED 473 Student Teaching in Industrial Arts. Preq. Admission to teacher education. 8(0- 
8). F. Students in industrial arts will devote eight weeks during the fall semester to full-time, 
off-campus student teaching in selected public schools throughout the state. They will be 
assigned to their teaching center in the preceding spring and will report to their supervising 
teachers when the public schools (to which they are assigned) open in the fall. During the 
remainder of the term, additional courses will be taken in concentrated form. Young 

ED 475 Methods of Teaching Science. Preq: ED 203, 344, PSY 304. 3(3-0) F. A study of 
the purposes, methods, materials, curricula and evaluation practices appropriate for 
teachers of physical and natural science at the secondary level. Anderson, Simpson 

ED 476 Student Teaching in Science. Preq: ED 203, 344, PSY 304; Coreq: Sr. standing 
and admission to teacher education, ED 475, 477. 8(2-15) F. Provides prospective teachers 
with an opportunity to get experience in the skills and techniques involved in teaching 
science. Each student during the senior year will spend 10 weeks off-campus in a selected 
center. In addition to acquiring competencies for teaching science, the student teacher may 
become familiar with the total program and may participate in as many community ac- 
tivities as time permits. Anderson, Simpson 
ED 477 Instructional Materials in Science. Preq: ED 203, 344, PSY 304; Coreq: ED 475, 
476, sr. standing and admission to teacher education. 2(1-3) F. Developing and selecting 
teaching materials in keeping with the new and changing concepts of the content and 
emphasis in high school science, particularly the experimental and laboratory approach. Stu- 
dents study the latest instructional materials and discover or devise materials and aids for in- 
creasing the effectiveness of the content and instruction. Anderson, Simpson 
ED 479 Industrial Arts Laboratory Planning. Preq: Junior standing in industrial arts 
education. 3(1-4) F. Industrial arts laboratory planning for efficient and safe operations, 
management of materials and supplies, budgeting, inventory, maintenance of common tools 
and equipment, safety equipment, and regulations and practices pertaining to laboratory 
operations are considered. Young 
ED 480 Methods and Materials in Teaching Speech. Preq: PSY 304, ED 344, sr. 
standing and admission to teacher education with a major in speech. 3(3-0) S. The purposes, 

223 



curricula, materials and methods of teaching speech, including public speaking, discussion, 
debate, speech improvement, oral reading and play production. Staff 

ED 481 Student Teaching in Speech. Preq: ED 205, 344, PSY 304, sr. standing and ad- 
mission to teacher education. 8 S. Provides the prospective teacher with an opportunity to 
acquire experience in the techniques and skills involved in teaching speech. Each student 
during the senior year will spend 10 weeks in a selected off-campus center. Staff 

ED 483 An Introduction to Instructional Media. Preq: Advanced undergrad. standing. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. The characteristics and utilization of media for instruction; study and im- 
plementation of the relationship between media and instructional objectives; and elemen- 
tary projects in designing, developing, and using instructional media materials. Gibson 

ED 490 Senior Seminar in Agricultural Education. 1(1-0) F,S. Analysis of opportunities 
and problems facing educational leaders in agriculture with emphasis upon current 
problems. Staff 

ED 495 Senior Seminar in Mathematics and Science Education. 1-3 F,S. An in-depth 
investigation of a teaching area in mathematics and/or science education by above-average 
department majors following their student teaching. Staff 

ED 496 Senior Seminar in Education. Preq: CI. 1-3 F,S,Sum. An in-depth investigation 
and discussion of a topic or set of problems in professional education. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 500 The Community College System. Preq: Grad. or advanced undergrad. standing. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Comprehensive community colleges and technical institutes and the state 
systems of which they are a part; underlying concepts, education needs they serve, role in 
meeting these needs, historical development, issues in the establishment and operation of 
state systems and individual institutions, unresolved issues and emerging trends. 

Gregg, Segner 

ED (SOC) 501 Leadership. 3(3-0) F,S. (See sociology, page 310.) 

ED 503 The Programming Process in Adult and Community College Education. Preq: 
ED 501, CI. 3(3-0) F,S. Principles and processes involved in programming, including basic 
theories and supporting concepts. Attention to the general framework in which programming 
is done, the organization needed and the program roles of professional and lay leaders. 

Boone, White 

ED 504 Principles and Practices of Introduction to Vocations. Preq: Twelve hours ED. 
3(3-0) F,S. Designed for North Carolina public school teachers of Introduction to Vocations. 
Emphasizes the place of the Introductioin to Vocations Program in the overall school 
curriculum, special methods of instruction, use of teaching aids and use of student evalua- 
tion instruments. An overview in community organization, job markets, group procedures, 
occupational and educational information, and the changing occupational structure in our 
society. Cox 

ED 506 Education of Exceptional Children. Preq: Six hours ED or PSY. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 
Principles and techniques of teaching the exceptional child, especially the mentally handi- 
capped and slow learner. Practice in curriculum instruction for groups of children, and in- 
dividual techniques for dealing with retarded children in the average classroom. Opportunity 
for individual work with an exceptional child. Mahmoud 

ED 509 Methods and Materials-Teaching Retarded Children. Preq: ED 506. 3(3-0) 
Emphasis on understanding and correlating developmental levels of mentally retarded 
children and appropriate educational methods and materials. Use of individual child's 
diagnostic data; consideration of long and short range education scheduling; teacher 
guidance of children toward social and emotional maturity. Mahmoud 

ED 511 Implications of Mathematical Content, Structure and Processes for the 
Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary School. Preq: Bachelor's degree in elemen- 
tary education, or CI. 3(3-0) Designed for teachers and supervisors of mathematics in the 
elementary school. Emphasis on implications of mathematical content, structure and 
processes in teaching arithmetic and geometry in the elementary school. Attention to use of 
logic and fundamental rules of inference, deductive and inductive reasoning, the field proper- 

224 



ties in the sets of integers and rational numbers, elementary number theory, metric and non- 
metric geometry. Watson 

ED 512 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School. Preq: ED 471 or equiv. 3(3-0) 
Emphasis on the laboratory approach to teaching mathematics and the use of the 
manipulative materials and activities of the Nuffield Project, the Madison Project, Dienes, 
Cuisenaire, and Gattegno. Attention to research supporting the laboratory approach using 
manipulative materials in the elementary school. Suggestions for designing activities for in- 
dependent and group study and in assessing individual progress. Watson 

ED (SOC) 513 Community Organization and Development. 3(3-0) F. (See sociology, 
page 310.) 

ED 514 Formative Ideas in American Education. Preq: Six hrs. ED or PSY or CI. 3(3-0) 
F.Sum. An analysis of the theory and practice of American education as a logical extension of 
the philosophical assumptions of different intellectual ages and how the present status of our 
educational system is grounded in the thought of the past. Beezer, Ivie 

ED 515 Teaching Disadvantaged Youth. Preq: Six hrs. ED or PSY; teaching experience. 
3(3-0) Alt. F,Sum. This course presents a theoretical structure for looking at and un- 
derstanding the problems of disadvantaged youth in our educational system. It offers a set of 
alternative teaching strategies for improving the quality of instruction in the classroom. 

Ivie 

ED 516 Community Occupational Surveys. Preq: Six hours ED, CI. 2(2-0) S. Methods in 
organizing and conducting local surveys and evaluation of findings in planning a program of 
vocational education. Shore, Hanson 

ED 517 Implications for Data Processing in Education. Preq: CSC 111; ED 529 or CI. 

3(3-0) S. Current attempts to apply new technologies to education. Attention to research 
findings related to Computer Assisted Instruction, gamed instructional simulation, ap- 
proaches to guidance and prescription learning. Administrative problems pertaining to stu- 
dent scheduling, pupil transportation and data reporting systems. Staff 

ED 518 Principles of School Law. Preq: Six hours graduate credit. 3(3-0) F. Intensive 
study of legal rights, duties, privileges and responsibilities entailed in the educational enter- 
prise. Covers the essentials of school law for both 1 ) the processes of law as they affect Amer- 
ican education and 2) specific legal aspects which affect vocational education. Included are 
the secondary, post-secondary and adult vocational education laws and their implications. 

Beezer 

ED 519 Early Childhood Education. Preq: PSY 475 or 576. 3(1-4) The plannings, selec- 
tion and utilization of human resources, activities, materials and facilities relating to the 
education of young children. Emphasis on student observation, participation and evaluation 
of educational experiences appropriate for the developmental level of individual children, in- 
cluding flexible grouping, curricula planning and instructional techniques for an optimum 
learning environment. A synthesis of the student's knowledge of human development, learn- 
ing theory and research findings as related to classroom application. Staif 

ED 520 Personnel and Guidance Services. Preq: Six hours in ED or PSY. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. The philosophies, theories, principles and practices of personnel and guidance ser- 
vices; the relationship of personnel services with the purposes and objectives of the school 
and the curriculum. Staff 

ED 521 Internship in Guidance and Personnel Services. Preq: Eighteen hours in 
department and CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. A continuous full-time internship of at least one- 
half semester. Framework of school and community. Work with students, teachers, ad- 
ministrators, guidance and pupil personnel workers, parents, and resource personnel in the 
community. Supervision of intern by school guidance personnel and course instructors. Staff 

ED 522 Career Exploration. Preq: ED 344, grad. status or CI. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. Designed 
for North Carolina public school teachers in career exploration programs. Emphasizes the 
philosophy, theories and the place of career exploration programs in the overall school 
curriculum. Correlation of occupational information in academic subjects, sources of oc- 
cupational information and its use. and approaches to teaching. Cox 
ED 523 Orientation and Mobility of the Visually Impaired. 3(3-0) Sum. The sensors 
processes and cues on which independent mobility depends for the visually impaired person. 

225 



Various techniques and modes of travel considered. Emphasis on instruction and background 
which will enable persons not teaching orientation mobility as a skill to reinforce the learning 
that takes place in other situations. R. Rawls 

ED 524 Occupational Information. Preq: Six hours ED or PSY, ED 520 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Gives teachers, counselors, placement workers and personnel workers in 
business and industry an understanding of how to collect, classify, evaluate and use oc- 
cupational and educational information. Includes a study of the world of work, sources of oc- 
cupational information, establishing an educational-occupational information library, using 
educational, occupational and social information and sociological and psychological factors, 
influencing career planning. Hopke 

ED 525 Trade Analysis and Course Construction. Preq: ED 344, PSY 304. 3(3-0) F. 
Principles and practices in analyzing occupations to determine teaching content. Practice in 
the principles underlying industrial course organization based on occupational analysis 
covering instruction in skills and technology and including course outlines, job sequences, 
the development of industrial materials and instructional schedules. Shore, Hanson 

ED 526 Teaching in College. 3(3-0) F,S, Sum. Designed for graduate students not in 
Education. Focuses on developing competencies to perform the day-to-day tasks of a college 
teacher, long-range tasks such as course development and the university responsibilities of a 
professor. Students will make video tapes of their teaching, develop tests, design an introduc- 
tory course in teaching field, and engage in other similar types of activities. Simpson 

ED 528 Cooperative Occupational Education. Preq: CI. 3(3-0) F,S. Designed for in- 
dividuals preparing to be directors, administrators or supervisors of vocational education 
programs at the local, state and/or national levels. Emphasis on organization and operation 
of cooperative occupational programs. Covers the entire field of cooperative occupational 
education on secondary, post-secondary and adult levels with references to accepted essen- 
tials of cooperative education so details of planning, organization, establishment, and opera- 
tion of cooperative occupational programs will be practical and meaningful. Student visita- 
tions to existing quality programs in cooperative occupational education to study on-site con- 
ditions in specialized areas. Smith 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development. Preq: ED 525. 3(3-0) F. Selection and 
organization of curricula used in vocational-industrial and technical education; development 
of curricula and instructional materials. Hanson 

FD 530 Group Guidance. Preq: Six hours ED or PSY, ED 520 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
£,Sum. Designed to help teachers, counselors, administrators and others who work with 
groups, or who are responsible for group guidance activities, to understand the theory and 
principles of effective group work, to develop skill in using specific guidance techniques, and 
to plan and organize group activities in the secondary school and other institutions. Locke 

ED (PSY) 531 Mental Deficiency. Preq: Nine hours PSY and special education. 3(3-0) 
F,Sum. Description, causation, psychological factors and sociological aspects of mental 
retardation. Education methods for the mentally retarded. Course designed primarily for 
school psychologists and special-class teachers of retarded children, both educable and 
trainable. Mahmoud 

ED 534 Guidance in the Elementary School. Preq: Nine hours PSY or CI. 3(3-0) F. 
Designed for acquainting elementary school teachers, counselors and administrators with 
theory, practice and organization of elementary school guidance. Hopke 

ED 535 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education. Preq: Nine hours PSY or CI. 3(3- 
0) F,S. Examines practices in various areas of student personnel work. Studies both structure 
and function of personnel programs in higher education. McVay 

ED 536 Structure and Function of the Eye and Use of Low Vision. Preq: CI. 3(5-0) 
Sum. In this special institute participants spend a minimum of 45 hours in class and related 
activities. Medical and educational consultants discuss the structure and function of the eye, 
eye anomalies likely to affect children with low vision, methods of evaluating type and poten- 
tial use of residual vision, and methods of teaching children to use minimal vision effectively. 
Course for teachers and administrators either presently employed in or planning to par- 
ticipate in educational programs for low vision persons. R. Rawls 

ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function in Higher Education. Preq: ED 
226 



510. 3(3-0) S. The background, history, philosophy and contemporary nature of the extension 
and public service function of institutions of higher education in the United States. 
Emphasis on the adult education role of public and private universities and colleges. Specific 
focus on: general, industrial, engineering, and cooperative extension and continuing 
education. Compton, Trent 

ED 540 Individual and Group Appraisal I. Preq: ED 520, PSY 535, or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
Use of group tests of intelligence, interest and achievement in educational and career plan- 
ning and placement. Theories of intelligence and interest will be followed by laboratory in 
evaluating, administering and interpreting widely used group test. Emphasis on group test 
use in group guidance. Staff 

ED 542 Contemporary Approaches in the Teaching of Social Studies. Preq: Advanced 
undergrad. or grad. must have completed student teaching. 3(3-0) S.Sum. Analysis of princi- 
ples, strategies and applications of new teaching approaches. Team-teaching, programmed 
instruction, inductive and reflective oriented teaching, role-playing, simulation and gaming, 
independent study and block-time organization. Harper, Parramore 

ED 545 Improvement of Reading Abilities. Preq: Twelve hours ED or PSY. 3(3-0) 
S.Sum. Methods used in developing specific reading skills or in overcoming certain reading 
difficulties; methods used in developing pupil vocabularies and word analysis skills. How to 
control vocabulary burden of reading material. Fox, Mahmoud 

ED 546 Principles and Practices of Secondary School Reading Instruction. Preq: 
Twelve hrs. ED or PSY. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A study of principles and practices of teaching 
reading at the secondary school level including reading instruction in the content areas. Fox 

ED 547 Analysis of Reading Abilities. Preq: ED 545 or 546. 3(3-0) F,Sum. A study of 
tests and techniques in determining specific abilities; a study of reading retardation and fac- 
tors underlying reading difficulties. Fox, Mahmoud 

ED 548 Theory and Process in Reading and Language Arts. Preq: Twelve hrs. ED or 
PSY. 3(3-0) S, Alt. yrs. An investigation of theoretical models and processes in reading and 
language arts with emphasis on the translation of research findings to instructional 
practice. Fox 

ED 552 Industrial Arts in the Elementary School. Preq: Twelve hours ED, CI. 3(3-0) 
Sum. To help elementary teachers and principals understand how tools, materials and in- 
dustrial processes vitalize and supplement the child's experiences. Practical children's pro- 
jects along with the building of classroom equipment. Staff 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education. Preq: ED 41 1 or equivalent. 3(3- 
0) F,S. Consideration of the need for planning programs in education; objectives and evalua- 
tion of community programs; use of advisory group; organization and use of facilities in 
agricultural education. Bryant, Clary 

ED 555 Comparative Crafts and Industries. Preq: Advanced undergrad. or grad. 
standing, CI. 6. A travel seminar as a cultural appreciations course involving study of in- 
digenous crafts and industries, their materials, processes, products and design in foreign 
countries. Staff 

ED 559 Learning Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community College 
Education. Preq: Six hours ED. 3(3-0) F,S. Principles in adult education programs including 
theories and concepts undergirding and requisite to these programs. Emphasis on in- 
terrelationship of the nature of adult learning, the nature of the subject matter and the 
setting in which learning occurs. The applicability of relevant principles and pertinent 
research findings to adult learning. Glass. Knowles, Parsons 

ED (IA) 560 New Developments in Industrial Arts Education. 3(3-0) F.S. (See in 
dustrial arts, page 261.) 

ED 563 Effective Teaching. Preq: Twelve hours ED including student teaching. 3(3-0) 
F, S.Sum. Analysis of the teaching-learning process; assumptions that underlie course ap- 
proaches; identifying problems of importance; problem solution for effective learning; 
evaluation of teaching and learning; making specific plans for effective teaching. Staff 
ED 565 Agricultural Occupations. Preq: ED 411. 3(3-0) F.S. Career development in 
agricultural occupations is associated with curriculum development needs. Occupational ex- 
perience in agriculture is seen in relation to curriculum and placement. Miller 

227 



ED 566 Occupational Experience in Agriculture. Preq: ED 411. 3(3-0) F,S. Im- 
plementing new and expanded concepts of occupational experience including how to effect 
student learning experiences in a real and simulated employment environment. Study of 
theoretical foundations underlying the new developments in occupational experiences to 
stimulate individual growth and creativity in implementing further developments. Miller 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture. Preq: ED 411 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Designed for leaders in adult education. Basic problems and values in working with adult 
groups. Attention to the problem of fitting the education program for adults into the public 
school program and other educational programs as well as methods of teaching adults. Staff 

ED 570 Foundations of Mathematics Education. Preq: ED 471 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
Assumptions and justifications underlying prevailing practices in secondary mathematics 
teaching are identified and examined within the broader context of mathematics education. 
Judging pedagogical techniques and curricular innovations is based upon a historical over- 
view of the field, psychological considerations relating to mathematics learning, comparison 
in national and international mathematics education, and research evidence. Staff 

ED 575 Foundations of Science Education. Preq: ED 475 or equiv. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 
Philosophical, historical, sociological, political and economic relationships affecting science 
education in U. S. schools will be analyzed and evaluated. Psychological theory will be ap- 
plied to the teaching and learning processes. Emphasis will be directed toward developing 
skills in planning educational objectives, instructional strategies and evaluation procedures. 
Multiple positions will be examined regarding current trends, issues and problems in science 
education. Simpson 

ED 590 Individual Problems in Guidance. Preq: Six hours graduate work in department 
of equivalent and CI. Maximum 6 F,S. Intended for individual or group studies of problems 
in guidance and personnel work. Problems selected to meet individuals' interests. The 
workshop procedure will be used whereby special projects, reports, and research will be 
developed by individuals and by groups. Staff 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching. Preq: ED 471 or equivalent. 1-3 
F,S. Investigation of current problems in mathematics teaching, emphasizing curriculum, 
methodology, facilities, supervision and research. Specific problems will be studied in depth. 
Opportunities to initiate research studies. 

ED 593 Special Problems in Agricultural Education. Preq: ED 411 or equivalent. 
Credits Arranged. F,S. Study of current problems under staff guidance. Staff 

ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching. Preq: ED 476 or equivalent. 1-3 F,S. In- 
vestigation of current problems with emphasis on curriculum, methodology, facilities, super- 
vision and research. Specific problems will be studied in depth. Opportunities to initiate 
research studies. Staff 

ED (IA) 595 Industrial Arts Workshop. Preq: One or more years of teaching experience. 
3(3-0) Sum. A course for experienced teachers, administrators and supervisors of industrial 
arts. Primarily to develop sound principles and practices for initiating, conducting and 
evaluating programs. Enrollees will pool their knowledge and practical experiences and do 
intensive research on individual and group program. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 505 Public Area Schools. 3(3-0) F.Sum. 

ED 510 Adult Education: History, Philosophy, Contemporary Nature. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 527 Philosophy of Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 533 Organization and Administration of Guidance Services. Preq: ED 520 or equiv. 
3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and Community College Education. Preq: 
ED 559. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 550 Principles of Educational Administration. Preq: CI. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 591 Special Problems in Industrial Education. Preq: Six hrs. grad. cr., CI. Max. 6 
F,S. 

228 



ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and Community College Education. Credits 
Arranged F,S. 

ED 597 Special Problems in Education. Preq: CI. 1-3 F,S. 

ED 598 Concepts and Strategies of Understanding, Motivating and Teaching Disad- 
vantaged Adults. 3(3-0) S. 

Electrical Engineering 

EE 201 Electric Circuits I. Preq: PY 205, MA 201; Coreq: PY 208, MA 202. 4(3-3) F,S. In- 
troduction to analysis of electric circuits. Circuit elements and parameters, resistance, 
capacitance, inductance, impedance, admittance, charge, current, voltage, energy, power. 
Kirchhoffs voltage and current laws. Superposition, periodic functions, RMS values, 
phasors, resonance, Q, bandwidth. 

EE 202 Electric Circuits II. Preq: EE 201 4(3-3) F,S,Sum. Continuation of EE 201. 
Analysis of electric circuits by consideration of equivalent circuits which arise in the study of 
solid state electronics, digital circuits, and AC systems. Transistor equivalent circuits, am- 
plifier frequency response, operational amplifiers, logic gates. Magnetic circuits, transfor- 
mers, polyphase circuits. 

EE 211 Electric Circuits I, Theory. Preq: MA 102. 3(3-0). Theory part of EE 201. Offered 
only by correspondence. Enrollment subject to approval of EE undergraduate administrator. 

EE 213 Electric Circuits I, Laboratory. Preq: EE 211. 1(0-2) Sum. Laboratory part of EE 
201. Enrollment subject to approval of EE undergraduate adminstrator and limited to stu- 
dents who have passed EE 211. 

EE 301 Linear Systems. Preq: EE 202, MA 301. 3(2-2). F,S. Introduction to representa- 
tion and analysis of linear systems. Topics covered include impulse response and convolu- 
tion, Fourier analysis, and Laplace transforms. The techniques are illustrated by applica- 
tions from communications and control systems analysis. 

EE 302 Numerical Applications in Electrical Engineering. Preq: EE 202. 3(2-2) F. This 
course introduces the student to modern problem solving techniques in electrical engineering 
using the computer. The course consists of a series of analysis and design problem examples 
in electrical engineering. 

EE 303 Electromagnetic Fields. Preq: EE 202, MA 301. 4(3-2.5) F,S. Limitations of 
lumped constant circuit models and the necessity for distributed parameter models. Elec- 
tromagnetic wave propagation on transmission lines, in waveguides and in unbounded space. 
Introduction to antennas and propagation. 

EE 304 Electromagnetic Fields II. Preq: EE 303, MA 301. 3(2-3) S. (This course will be 
dropped Spring Semester, 1978). Vector and scalar retarded potentials. Generation and 
propagation of energy by electromagentic waves. Relationship between field theory and cir- 
cuit theory. Applications of electro-magnetic theory to devices and to distributed parameter 
systems. 

EE 305 Electric Power Systems. Preq: EE 202 or EE 331. 4(3-2.5) S. Principles perfor- 
mance and characteristics of direct-current and alternating current machinery. Considera- 
tion of the components, protective devices and power flow of a typical power distribution 
system for an industrial plant. Application of digital computers to fault calculations. 
EE 314 Electronic Circuits. Preq: EE 202. 4(2-5). F,S. Electronic design fundamentals, 
including circuit properties of active devices, linear and digital integrated circuits, power and 
industrial electronics. Emphasis is on the terminal characteristics and circuit applications of 
integrated circuits and solid-state devices. 

EE 331 Principles of Electrical Engineering. Preq: MA 201, PY 208. 3(3-0) F.S. Not 
available to EE undergraduates. Basic concepts, units and methods of EE analysis. Current - 
voltage characteristics of linear and nonlinear electrical devices, analysis of d-c and a-c cir- 
cuits, simple amplifiers and energy conversion devices. Demonstrations of equipment and 
procedures. 

EE 332 Principles of Electrical Engineering. Preq: EE 331. 3(3-0) S. Not available to BE 
undergraduates. Power distribution systems, motors, feedback, amplifiers, oscilloscopes, 

229 



voltage meters, digital information, measurement by digital means, presented from the 
user's viewpoint. Demonstrations of equipment and procedures. 

EE 333 Principles of Electrical Engineering Laboratory. Coreq: EE 332. 1(0-3) S. Not 
open to EE students. Laboratory work in the material covered in EE 332. 

EE 339 Principles of Electrical Engineering Laboratory. Coreq: EE 331. 1(0-3) F,S. Not 
open to EE students. Laboratory work in the material covered in EE 331. 
EE 340 Fundamentals of Digital Systems. Preq: Junior standing. 4(3-3). F,S. The basic 
concepts involved in the design of digital electronic networks. Topics include discussion of 
available packages and parameters, specification and design of combinational and sequen- 
tial networks, digital subsystems, and system organization. 

EE 350 Electric Power Utilization in Manufacturing Processes. Preq: PY 212, MA 201. 
3(2-3) F,S. Not available to undergraduates in EE. Basic electrical theory; d-c and a-c cir- 
cuits and measurements; study of d-c motors and of single-phase and polyphase utilization 
equipment; basic control systems and brief introduction to principles of automatic control. 
Examples drawn from the technologies of particular interest to current student. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 403 Electrical Network Design. Preq: EE 301 3(3-0) S. Design methods for such elec- 
tric networks as resonant systems, filters, feedback stabilizers, audio amplifier conpensation 
and dividing networks. 

EE 406 Dynamical Systems Analysis. Preq: EE 202 or 331, ESM 305, MA 301. 3(3-0) F. 
Dynamic systems in various branches of engineering and science emphasizing similarities 
among such integrated groups of devices. Analogous elements and quantities in these fields 
as determined from basic equations. Use of computers to solve systems problems. 
EE 431 Electronics Engineering. Preq: EE 314. 3(2-3) F. Design and analysis of discrete 
and integrated solid-state electronic circuits which include amplifiers, waveform generators, 
and feedback. Design is emphasized through projects and through analysis of contemporary 
electronic circuits. 

EE 432 Communication Engineering. Preq: EE 431. 3(2-3) S. Application of Electronic 
Circuits to Communication systems employing sine wave and pulse modulation. Elements of 
complete systems (modulators, demodulators, transmitters and receivers) are designed, 
analyzed and implemented. 

EE 433 Electric Power Engineering. Preq: EE 305 or 332. 3(2-3) S. Electric power supply 
for industrial and commercial applications. Control of electric motor drives. Principles of cir- 
cuit protection and safety. Laboratory experience in testing electric machines. 
EE 434 Power System Analysis. Preq: EE 305. 3(3-0) F. Problems encountered in the 
long-distance transmission of electric power with emphasis on load flow, economic dispatch, 
and fault calculations. Applications of digital computers to power-system problems. 
EE 435 Elements of Control. Preq: EE 314, 305. 3(2-3) F. Introductory theory of open- and 
closed-loop control. Dynamic analysis of error detectors, amplifiers, and motors. Component 
transfer characteristics and block diagram representation. Analog simulation of a control 
system. 

EE 438 Electronic Instrumentation. Preq: MA 301; EE 314 or 332. 3(3-0) S. Electrical- 
electronic measurement techniques and operating principles of electronic instruments. 
Signal sources and their equivalent circuits, basic electronics including junction and field ef- 
fect transistors, operational amplifiers, switching logic and data display. Applications in- 
cluding low-level phenomena and noise problems. Lecture demonstrations. 
EE 441 Introduction to Electron Devices. Preq: MA 301, PY 208. 3(3-0) F. The basic 
physical principles necessary for understanding modem electronic devices. Quantum and 
statistical mechanic concepts are introduced forming the basis for a discussion of a wide 
variety of devices used in modern engineering and instrumentation. 

EE 442 Introduction to Solid-State Devices. Preq: EE 441 or PY 407; MA 301. 3(3-0) S. 
The microscopic phenomena responsible for the operation of solid-state electronic devices. A 
qualitative description of the band model of solids. A description of the transport properties 
of charge carriers. P-n junction diodes and transistors, solar cells, controlled rectifiers, tunnel 
diodes and unijunction transistors, recently developed devices. 

230 



EE 443 Digital Systems Design. Preq: EE 340. 3(2-3). F. The practice of solving elec- 
tronic engineering problems using digital techniques. Includes the application of the con- 
cepts of problem specification, organization, and design. Introduction to current technology 
and state-of-the-art components. Experience in utilizing this background in the design, im- 
plementation and testing of a class project. 

EE 445 Introduction to Antennas. Preq: EE 303, 314. 3(2-3) F. Consideration of radiation 
from single-element radiators, radiation patterns, directive properties aperture concepts, 
gain and impedances. Multi-element antennas and arrays with various amplitude distribu- 
tions and phasings, and thin linear antennas. Antennas of current usage. 

EE 448 Introduction to Microwaves. Preq: EE 303, 314. 3(2-3) S. The elementary theory 
and special techniques required at microwave frequencies. Passive and active circuits. 
Transmission elements, special-purpose components, generators, to include klystrons, 
magnetrons, traveling wave tubes, and solid-state devices will be discussed. The description 
of microwave networks by the scattering matrix. 

EE 492 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. Preq: Jr. standing. 3(3-0 to 0-9) F,S. 
Offered as needed to cover new or special subjects. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 503 Computer-Aided Circuit Analysis. Preqs: EE 314, 301, B average in EE and MA. 
3(3-0) F. Analysis of electrical circuits with emphasis on computer methods. Steady-state 
and transient analysis of linear and nonlinear networks; tolerance analysis; programming 
considerations. Staudhammer 

EE 504 Introduction to Network Synthesis. Preq: EE 301, B average in EE and MA. 3(3- 
0) S. The properties of network functions and the development of the methods of network 
synthesis of one-port and two-port passive structures. 

EE 511 Electronic Circuits. Preq: EE 314, B average in EE and MA 3(3-0) F. Electronic 
devices and circuits in communications, power and industrial applications. Synthesis of cir- 
cuits to satisfy system requirements. Staff 

EE 512 Communication Theory. Preq: EE 301, B average in EE and MA. 3(3-0) F. Com- 
munication signals in the frequency and time domains. Probability and associated functions, 
random signal theory, modulation and frequency translation, noise, sampling theory, 
correlation functions, and information theory. Accent on methods and problems unique to 
the field of digital communication. (Offered F every year and S 1978.) Staff 

EE 516 Feedback Control Systems. Preq: EE 435, or 301 and B average in EE and MA. 
3(3-0) S. The feedback systems for automatic control of physical quantities such as voltage, 
speed and mechanical positon. Theory of regulating systems and servo mechanisms. Steady- 
state and transient responses. Evaluation of stability. Transfer function loci and root locus 
plots. Analysis using differential equation and operational methods. Systems compensation 
and introduction to design. Staff 

EE 517 Control Laboratory. Coreq: EE 516. 1(0-3) S. Feedback systems for automatic 
control of physical quantities such as voltage, speed and mechanical position. Characteristics 
of regulating systems and servomechanisms. The laboratory work contributes to un- 
derstanding theory developed in EE 516. Staff 
EE 520 Fundamentals of Logic Systems. Preq: EE 340, B average in EE and MA. 3(3-0) 
F. A study of algebraic structures as related to logic systems, models for switching circuit 
behavior and their relation to hardware implementation. Includes theoretical treatment of 
both combinational and sequential logic systems concepts. Staff 
EE 521 Digital Computer Technology and Design. Preq: EE 520. 3(3-0) S. The internal 
organization and structure of digital systems including gates, toggle circuits, pulse circuitry 
and advanced machine language theory. Analysis and synthesis of major computer compo- 
nents, including the logic section, storage devices, registers, input -out put and control. 

Staff 

EE 530 Physical Electronics. Preq: EE 304, B average in EE and M A.3(3-0) F. A study of 
the properties of charged particles under the influence of fields and in solid materials. Quan- 
tum mechanics, particle statistics, semi-conductor properties, fundamental particle 
transport properties and lasers. (Offered F every year, Sum. 1977 and S 1979.) Staff 

231 



EE 533 Integrated Circuits. Preq: EE 314, B average in EE and MA. 3(3-0) S. A study of 
the implementation of solid state circuits in integrated form. Includes thin film, bipolar and 
MOS technologies and their application to digital and linear systems. Manning 

EE 540 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves. Preq: EE 304, B average in EE and MA. 3(3- 
0) F. Laws and concepts of static electromagnetism. Fundamental equations and their ap- 
plications. Fundamentals, forms and applications of Maxwell's equations. Vector and scalar 
potentials, relativistic aspects of fields, energy and power. Waves in unbound and bounded 
regions, radiation, wave-guides and resonators. Geometrical and physical optics. (Offered F 
every year, S 1977 and Sum. 1979.) Staff 

EE 545 Introduction to Radio Wave Propagation. Preq: EE 304, B average in EE and 
MA. 3(3-0) S. Characteristics of a plan e electromagnetic waves in homogeneous and non- 
homogeneous media with application to tropospheric and ionospheric propagation. 
Relationships between electron density, collision frequency and complex refractive index, 
theory of the formation and dynamics of ionospheric layers and theorems for the prediction of 
ionospheric propagation. Flood 

EE (PY) 552 Introduction to the Structure of Solids. 3(3-0) (See physics, p. 293.) 

EE (MAE) 565 Gas Lasers. 3(3-0) F,S. (See mechanical and aerospace engineering, page 
275.) 

EE 591, 592 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. Preq: B average in technical sub- 
jects. 3(3-0) F,S. A two-semester sequence to develop new courses and explore areas of special 
interest. Staff 

EE 593 Individual Topics in Electrical Engineering. Preq: B average in technical sub- 
jects. 1-3 F,S. The student explores topics of special interest under faculty direction. 

Engineering 

GENERAL COURSES 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I. 2(1-2) F,S. Graphically representing and solving spatial 
problems. Emphasis on development of a logical and analytic approach to problem solution. 
Conventional methods of graphically describing size and shape, the representation of basic 
mechanical elements. Practical engineering applications utilized. Staff 

E 120 Engineering Concepts. Not open to jrs. and srs. in Engineering. 3(2-1) F.S. Stu- 
dents are involved in realistic freshman design projects. History, fields and functions of 
engineering, case studies, computational skills, and societal problems are covered. Staff 

E 201 Spatial Relations and Vector Applications. Preq: First courses in graphics and 
physics. 3(2-2) S. Spatial representation of points, lines, and planes and the determination of 
the lengths, sizes, and angles that exist between these elements, with the application of these 
studies to vector systems. Webb 

E 207 Engineering Graphics II. Preq: E 101. 2(1-3) F,S. Presentation of engineering data 
for use in the manufacturing process. Production dimensioning, detail and assembly produc- 
tion drawings, and free-hand sketching are covered. Special emphasis on sketching. Webb 

E 220 Engineering and Contemporary Society. 3(3-0) F. Investigation of the role of 
engineering technology in modern life, with emphasis on technological factors involved in 
solution of national and world problems. Major topics such as energy, communication, 
materials, and transportation examined in terms of cultural and economic goals for the 
future. Staff 

E 240 Furniture Graphics. Preq: E 101. 3(1-4) F. Furniture drawing and dimensioning. 
Special practices of furniture industry are covered. Free-hand sketching is empha- 
sized. Freeman 

E 301 Graphical Solutions for Numerical Data. Preq: A first course in calculus. 3(2-2) F. 
Study of available graphic methods to represent and manipulate numerical data. Topics in- 
clude: proper selection of coordinate systems and axes, empirical equations, curve fitting, 
graphical calculus, nomography, and design of special purpose slide rules. Computer ap- 
plications demonstrated. Hammond 

E (CSC) 321 Computer Graphics. Preq: MA 202 or 212 and CSC 101 or 111. 3(2-2) S. 
Presentation of computer-graphic methods of data manipulation; which computer-graphic 

232 



methods are available; when and how they can be applied. Three-demensional applications 
covered. Houck 

E 432 Patents, Trademarks and Copyrights. Preq: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) S. Review of these 
laws in relation to engineering, scientific and industrial pursuits; individual inventors, 
authors, and companies; and Patent Office procedures and practice. Mills 

E 492 Special Topics in Engineering. Preq: Jr. Standing. 1-3 F,S. Offered as needed for 
subject matter of a non-departmental nature. 

E (OR) 531 Dynamical Systems and Multivariate Control. 3(3-0) F. (See operations 
research, page 287.) 

Engineering Honors 

EH 346 Fluid Mechanics. Preq: ESM 200 or 205; membership in Eng. HP or CI.* 3(3-0) 
S. Equilibrium of liquids and gases, kinematics and dynamics of frictionless fluids. Motion 
of viscous fluids. Dynamics of gases. Flow measurement techniques. 

EH 371 Thermodynamics I. Preq: Membership in Eng. HP or CI.* 3(3-0) F. Basic princi- 
ples and concepts. Emphasis on first and second laws, their implications and applications. 
Properties of actual and real gases. Also inter-relationships between the properties as given 
by the general equations of thermodynamics. 

EH 372 Thermodynamics II. Preq: Membership in Eng. HP or CI.* 3(3-0) S. Statistical 
approach to thermodynamics and application to determination of specific heats. Entrophy 
and probability. Thermodynamics of fluid flow including supersonic flow. Basic laws of heat 
transfer. Ideal gas and vapor cycles. Introduction to chemical thermodynamics. 

EH 391 Contemporary Trends in Engineering and Science. Preq: Membership in Eng. 
HP or CI.* 1(1-0) F. Representatives from various fields of engineering or science discuss 
current topics. 

EH 491 Engineering Honors Seminar. Preq: Sr. standing in the Eng. HP or CI.* 1(1-0) 
S. Presentation by students of their projects. 

EH 496 Special Topics in Engineering. Preq: Membership in the Eng. HP or CI.* 1-4 

F,S. Individual projects of a research or design nature. 

EH 500 Engineering Analysis. 1.4 F,S. Students work in small groups or individually 
with faculty advisers to solve realistic problems requiring integration of knowledge from 
engineering fields, physical sciences, mathematics, and occasionally life sciences. Aimed at 
synthesis rather than mere analysis. 

Engineering Operations 

EO 491 Seminar in Engineering Operations. Preq: Sr. standing. 1(1-0) F. Assists 
seniors in EO in making the transition from a college environment to that of industry 
through lectures, guest speakers and class discussion. Schedule during the last fall semester 
in residence. Easter 

Engineering Science and Mechanics 

ESM 200 Introduction to Mechanics. Coreq: MA 202. 3(3-0) F,S. Principles and con- 
cepts which form the basis for students in dynamics, solid and fluid mechanics. The nature 
and properties of force systems and stress fields. The motion of particles and description of 
deformation of continuous media. The role of Newton's laws, the concepts of continuity and 
equilibrium, and the conservational principles in problems in mechanics. CE Staff 

ESM 205 Principles of Engineering Mechanics. Preq: PY 205; Coreq: MA 202. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Basic concepts, forces and equilibrium, distributed forces, virtual work, and inertial 
properties; application to machines, structures and systems MAE Staff 

ESM 206 Introductory Applications in Mechanics. Coreq: ESM 205. 1(0-2) F. Princi- 
ples of mechanics applied to practical problems of engineering science in which numerical 
techniques of computation are emphasized. MAE Staff 



*Eng. HP or CI— engineering honors program or consent of instructor. 

233 



ESM 211 Introduction to Applied Mechanics. Coreq: MA 212, PY 212. 3(3-0) F,S. The 
concepts of particle and rigid body mechanics. The fundamentals of equilibrium, kinematics 
and kinetics are applied to engineering problems involving structures and machines. 

CE Staff 

ESM 212 Mechanics of Engineering Materials. Preq: ESM 211. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. An in- 
troduction to the mechanics of solids. Analysis of the stresses, strains, and deformations oc- 
curring in loaded structural and machine members (including buckling loads). CE Staff 

ESM 301 Mechanics of Solids. Preq: ESM 200. 3(3-0) F,S. For CE students. Develop- 
ment of the equations which describe the linear elastic solid. Approximate solutions and 
comparison with the theory of elasticity to problems involving axial, torsional and flexural 
loading. CE Staff 

ESM 303 Fluid Mechanics I. Preq: ESM 200 or 205. 3(3-0) F,S. Development of the basic 
equations of fluid mechanics in general and specialized form. Application to a variety of 
topics including 1) fluid statics, 2) inviscid, incompressible fluid flow and 3) viscous, incom- 
pressible fluid flow. MAE Staff 

ESM 304 Fluid Mechanics II. Preq: ESM 303. 3(3-0) F,S. Further applications of the 
basic equations of fluid mechanics to 1) boundary layers and analysis, 2) laminar and tur- 
bulent flows and 3) compressible fluid flow. Introduction to experimental methods in fluid 
mechanics. MAE Staff 

ESM 305 Engineering Dynamics. Preq: ESM 205; Coreq: MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. Equations 
of motion; kinematics, kinetics of mass points and systems of mass points; kinematics and 
kinetics of rigid bodies; dynamics of nonrigid systems. MAE Staff 

ESM 307 Solid Mechanics I. Preq: ESM 205; Coreq: MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. Stresses, 
strains, constitutive laws, yield and fracture; application to axial, bending, torsional and 
plane stress states; deflection and stability analyses. MAE Staff 

ESM 308 Solid Mechanics II. Preq: ESM 301 or 307. 3(3-0) F,S. Equations for thin plates. 
Introduction to the theory of plasticity and experimental methods in solid mechanics. Plastic 
stress-strain relationships and two-dimensional problems in plastic behavior, and 
fracture. CE Staff 

ESM 311 Experimental Engineering Science I. Coreq: ESM 303, 305, 307. 3(1-6) F. The 
experimental analysis concept starting with the question of how observations and measure- 
ments are made. Illustrations of experimental methods which enable the inference of one 
physical variable by the observation of another but related one. Bingham 

ESM 312 Experimental Engineering Science II. Preq: ESM 311. 3(1-6) S. The ESM 311 

background is utilized in broader problems which require the synthesis from several ex- 
perimental methods as well as mathematical and/or numerical methods of an analytical 
system. Bingham 

ESM 411, 412 Engineering Cybernetics I, II. Preq: Sr. standing in ESM or equivalent 
background. 3(1-4) F,S. A year course of formal lectures on topics which include dynamics of 
linear and nonlinear systems; hereditary and feedback couplings; continuous, discrete, ran- 
dom and stochastic inputs; system stability; reliability; optimization; and the ultra-stable 
autonomous system. Student participation, in either individual or collective form, in extra- 
class work of personal character in the design of particular engineering systems. McDonald 

ESM 415 Engineering Science in Contemporary Design. Preq: Sr. standing in ESM. 
2(1-3) S. Draws upon student's background in engineering science to analyze current 
problems. Case histories and evaluation of selected designs. Bingham, Douglas 

ESM 495 Special Studies in Mechanics. 1-3 F,S. Offered as needed to treat new or 
special subject matter. CE & MAE Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ESM 501, 502 Continuum Mechanics I, II. Preq: ESM 307, ESM 303, MAE 301, MA 405. 
3(3-0) F,S. The concepts of stress and strain are presented in generalized tensor form. 
Emphasis on the discussion and relative comparison of the analytical models for elastic, 
plastic, fluid, viscoelastic, granular and porous media. Underlying thermodynamic princi- 
ples presented, the associated boundary value problems formulated and selected examples 
used to illustrate the theory. Chang, McDonald 



234 



ESM 503 Theory of Elasticity I. Preq: ESM 307; Coreq: MA 511 or 401. 3(3-0) F. The fun- 
damental equations governing the behavior of an elastic solid are developed in various cur- 
vilinear coordinate systems. Plane problems, as well as the St. Venant problem of bending, 
torsion and extension of bars are covered. Displacement fields, stress fields, Airy and com- 
plex stress functions are among the methods used to obtain solutions. Bingham. Douglas 

ESM 504 Mechanics of Ideal Fluids. Preq: ESM 304; Coreq: MA 513. 3(3-0) F. Basic 
equations of ideal fluid flow; potential and stream functions; vortex dynamics; body forces 
due to flow fields, methods of singularities in two-dimensional flows; analytical determina- 
tion of potential functions; conformal transformations; free-streamline flows. MAE Staff 
ESM 505 Mechanics of Viscous Fluids I. Preq: ESM 304; Coreq: MA 532. 3(3-0) S. Equa- 
tions of motion of a viscous fluid (Navier-Stokes equations); general properties of the Navier- 
Stokes equations; some exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations; boundary layer equa- 
tions; some approximate methods of solution of the boundary layer equations; laminar boun- 
dary layers in axisymetric and three-dimensional flows; unsteady laminar boundary 
layers. MAE Staff 

ESM 506 Mechanics of Compressible Fluids I. Preq: ESM 304, MAE 302, Coreq: MA 
532. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to the flow of a compressible fluid: thermodynamics and one- 
dimensional energy equation for a compressible gas. Acoustics, normal shock waves and ex- 
pansion waves, shock tube theory, general one-dimensional flow and flow in ducts and 
channels. MAE Staff 

ESM 507 Systems Analysis. Preq: ESM 305, MA 405. 3(3-0) F. The principles and con- 
cepts underlying systems analysis. Major topics are: finite-dimensional vector spaces, 
matrices and linear operators, state space and state equations, linear differential systems, 
and equilibrium and stability. Illustrations and applications from the broad areas of 
engineering mechanics and dynamical systems theory. The state variable approach is 
emphasized. MAE Staff 

ESM 508 Systems Synthesis. Preq: ESM 507. 3(3-0) S. The design of engineering systems 
in which mechanics dominates. MAE Staff 

ESM 509 Space Mechanics I. Preq: ESM 305. Coreq: MA 511. 3(3-0) F. The applications 

of mechanics to the analysis and design of orbits and trajectories. Trajectory computation 
and optimization; space maneuvers; reentrv trajectories; interplanetary guidance. 

MAE Staff 

ESM 510 Space Mechanics II. Preq: ESM 509, MA 511. 3(3-0) S. The analysis and design 
of guidance systems. Basic sensing devices; the characteristics of an inertial space; the theory 
of stabilized platforms; terrestrial inertial guidance. MAE Staff 

ESM 511 Theory of Plates and Shells. Preq: ESM 307, MA 511. 3(3-0) F. Bending 
theory of thin plates; geometry of surfaces and stresses in shells. Methods of analysis dis- 
cussed and illustrated. Bingham, Gurley 

ESM 521, 522 Properties of Solids I, II. Preq: ESM 307, MAT 301, PY 413. 3(3-0) F.S 
Micro and macro principles are applied toward an introductory understanding of material 
properties. The concepts of kinetic distribution and ensemble average of atomic behaviors 
are employed to characterize and interrelate material properties. Phenomenological 
behaviors and coupled effects are described within the continuum concept. Horie 

ESM 551 Advanced Strength of Materials. Preq: ESM 307. 3(3-0) F. Stresses and strains 
at a point; rosette analysis; stress theories, stress concentration and fatigue: plasticity; in- 
elastic composite and curved beams; prestress energy methods; shear deflections; buckling 
problems and column design; and membrane stresses in shells. Gurley 

ESM 552 Elastic Stability. Preq: ESM 551, MA 301, MA 405. 3(3-0) S. Elastic and plast a 
stability. The stability criterion as a determinant. The energy method and the theorem of 
stationary potential energy. The solution of buckling problems by finite differences and the 
calculus of variations. The application of successive approximations to stability problems. 
Optimization applied to problems of aeroelastic and civil engineering structures. Gurley 
ESM 555 Dynamics I. Preq: ESM 305, MA 405. 3(3-0) F. The theory of vibrations from 
the Lagrangian formulation of the equations of motion. Free and forced vibrations with and 
without damping, multiple degrees of freedom, coupled motion, normal mode vibrations. 
wave propagations in solid bodies. MAP. Statt 

235 



ESM 556 Dynamics II. Preq: ESM 305, MA 405. 3(3-0) S. The dynamics of particles and 
rigid bodies by the use of formulations of the laws of mechanics due to Newton. Euler, 
Lagrange and Hamilton. Accelerated reference frames, constraints, Euler's angles, the spin- 
ning top, the gyroscope, precession, stability, phase space and nonlinear oscillatory 
motion. MAE Staff 



English 

FRESHMAN ENGLISH 

Required of AH Freshmen 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric. 3(3-0) F,S. Basic forms and principles of expository 

communication; conferences. Staff 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading. Preq: A grade of C or better in ENG 111. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Expository writing; introduction to literary types; collateral reading; conference. Staff 

NOTE: ENG 111 and 112 must be scheduled in successive semesters until they are com- 
pleted satisfactorily. 

NOTE: Qualified students will be allowed to register for ENG 112H and will be given credit 
for ENG 111 upon successful completion of the course. Eligibility for ENG 112H is based on 
the student's predicted grade in English, employing a formula determined by Counseling, 
plus a composition to be written at the first or second class meeting of the ENG 112H section. 

NOTE: The prerequisite for all advanced courses in writing, language, or literature is the 
completion of ENG 111 and 112. Desirable preparation for literature courses of the 300 level 
or above is ENG 205, 206, 207, 208, or any semester of ENG 261, 262 or ENG 265, 266. 

WRITING 

ENG 200 Composition Laboratory. 0(0-2) F,S. The Compositon Laboratory is a noncredit 
course in composition designed for upperclassmen in any curriculum who are deficient in 
spelling, mechanics, sentence structure, and general organization. The Laboratory is not a 
substitute for courses in advanced composition. 

ENG 214 Copyediting. 3(3-0) F. Basic writing and editorial skills needed to work effec- 
tively with material produced by others. It emphasizes mechanical editing (e.g., consistency 
and correctness of punctuation, capitalization, spelling, hyphenation, parallellism, 
bibliographical references, illustrations, and headings) and substantive editing (rewriting, 
reorganizing, or suggesting other ways to present material). Bolch 

ENG 215 Principles of News and Article Writing. 3(3-0) F,S. Introduction to the techni- 
ques of conducting interviews and writing news stories (including feature articles) for a 
variety of news media. Bolch 

ENG 298 Special Projects in English. 1-3 F,S. Staff 

ENG 315 Reporting and Editing. Preq: ENG 215. 3(3-0) S. A journalism course in techni- 
ques of analyzing sources and readership; planning, organizing, and writing various kinds of 
articles; and editorial processes such as copyediting headline writing, and page layout. Bolch 
ENG 321 The Communication of Technical Information. 3(3-0) F,S. Intensive training 
in the fundamentals of business and industrial expository and persuasive writing. 

Blackman, Dandridge, Spears, Seidel 

ENG 322 Advanced Expository Writing. 3(3-0) F. Examines the rhetoric of the sentence, 
the paragraph and the whole discourse in order to develop awareness of the relationship be- 
tween structure and effect in expository writing. Blackman 
ENG 323 Creative Writing. 3(3-0), Maximum 6. F,S. For students who have 
demonstrated ability. Emphasis on short prose fiction or poetry. Students may register in 
this course for a maximum of six hours. Barrax, Jeffers, Owen, Walters 

ENG 324 Modern English.3(3-0) F,S. A study of modern English primarily intended for 
candidates for teaching certificates. Attention given to problems of composition, dialect, and 
usage. Myers, Short 



236 



LITERATURE 

ENG 205 Studies in Great Works of Literature.* 3(3-0) F,S. Literary masterpieces from 
the Classical Period to the present. Emphasis on reading for understanding and enjoyment 
both of the works themselves and the cultural contributions to Western civilization of the 
periods from which the works are drawn. Staff 

ENG 206 Studies In Drama.* 3(3-0) F,S. Selected drama from the Classical Period to the 
present. Emphasis on reading for enjoyment as well as understanding theory and develop- 
ment of tragedy, comedy, and other modes of dramatic expression. 

ENG 207 Studies in Poetry.* 3(3-0) F,S. Analysis of poetry and the critical approaches to 
it. Emphasis on appreciation of the nature of poetry and the critical approaches to it. 
Emphasis on appreciation of the nature of poetry, and understanding features and techni- 
ques. The importance of both historical context and new criticla techniques. Staff 

ENG 208 Studies In Fiction.* 3(3-0) F,S. Representative examples from the Renaissance 
to the present, emphasizing understanding and appreciation of fiction as a genre, a 
knowledge of the features and techniques of fiction, and a sense of the historical development 
of this genre. Staff 

ENG 261 English Literature I. 3(3-0) F,S. Beginnings to 1660 Staff 

ENG 262 English Literature II. 3(3-0) F,S. 1660 to present. Staff 

ENG 265 American Literature I. 3(3-0) F,S. Beginnings to Civil War. Staff 

ENG 266 American Literature II. 3(3-0) F,S. Civil War to present. Staff 

ENG 290 Classical Backgrounds of English Literature. 3(3-0) F. Acquaints student 
with the central story-matter of the ancient world — Greek, Roman and Hebrew — which has 
exerted such a profound influence on the civilization, and especially on the literature, of the 
Western world. Moore, F. Moore, Wall 

ENG 305 Women in Literature: Female Characterization from Chaucer to the Pre- 
sent. 3(3-0) S. This course will explore the nature of female characters as artistic entities to 
see these characters as part of literary and social convention. Emphasis will be given to the 
feminist or antifeminist attitude of each work. Baines 

ENG (REL) 325 Religion and the Modern Literary Imagination. 3(3-0) F. (See religion, 
page .) 

ENG 346 Literature of the Western World I. 3(3-0) F,S. The Search for Self: Readings 
from the earliest Hebraic and Greek literature to Dante. Smoot, Smith 

ENG 347 Literature of the Western World II. 3(3-0) S. Crisis and Confrontation: 
Readings from the European Renaissance to Tolstoi. Smoot 

ENG 369 American Novel of the 19th Century. 3(3-0) F. Analysis of selected romantic, 
realistic and naturalistic novels. J. Clark, Kilby and West 

ENG 370 The British Novel of the 18th and 19th Centuries. 3(3-0) F. Background of the 
English novel from its beginnings to the end of the 19th century. Analysis of the novel as a 
form. C. Moore, Durant 

ENG 371 The Modern Novel. (3-0) S. Background and pattern, and an analysis of major 
examples of the 20th century novel. C. Moore, Reynolds 

ENG 372 Modern Poetry. 3(3-0) S. Defining the "modern temper" by comparison of con- 
temporary poetry with that of the past. Reading and analysis of individual poems. 

Owen, Reynolds 

ENG 375 The Film: A Literary Medium. Preq: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) Hargrave 

ENG 376 Fantasy and Science Fiction. 3(3-0) S. A study of representative works, both 
novels and short stories, in the genre of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Emphasis is placed on 
those works written in the twentieth century, although some attention is given to the history 
and development of the genre. Meyers 

ENG 391 Introduction to American Folklore. 3(3-0) S. Principal types of folklore, com- 
bined with field work in collecting and assimilating materials from various cultural tradi- 
tions. Emphasis on American folklore and its origins. Betts, Owen 

•The courses ENG 205, 206. 207 and 208 are designed for students not enrolled in Liberal Arts. 

237 



ENG 395 Black American Literature. 3(3-0) F,S. A survey from significant beginnings to 
the present. Lucas, Barrax, Jeffers 

ENG 397 Literature of the Non-Western World. 3(3-0) F. Translations from the 
literature of Persia, India, China and Japan. Owen 

ENG 398 Contemporary Literature I (1900 to 1940). 3(3-0) F. Imaginative literature from 
the period 1900-1940 with emphasis upon themes and techniques rather than genre or 
nationality. Knowles, Reynolds 

ENG 399 Contemporary Literature II (1940 to present). 3(3-0) S. Representative 
French, American and British writers of the period 1940 to the present. Knowles, Reynolds 

ENG 439 17th Century English Literature. 3(3-0) S. Major nondramatic literary figures 
in England during the period 1600-1700. F. Moore, White, Wall 

ENG 449 The Renaissance. 3(3-0) F. Nondramatic prose and poetry of the 16th century, 
with consideration of literary types and movements. Emphasis on the works of major 
authors. Blank, Hester 

ENG 451 Chaucer. 3(3-0) F,S. Introduction to the study of Chaucer through an intensive 
reading of The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde. Holley, Koonce, Short 

ENG 453 The Romantic Period. 3(3-0) F. The poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, 
Shelley and Keats, with reading in the prose of Lamb, DeQuincey and others. 

P. Williams, Hargrave, Harrison, Engel, Lentz, King 

ENG 462 18th Century English Literature. 3(3-0) F. The major figures in English 
literature between 1660 and 1790 in the light of social, cultural, and religious change. 

Durant, White 

ENG 463 The Victorian Period. 3(3-0) S. Major poets and selected prose writers studied 
against the social, economic, scientific, and theological background of the century. 

Hargrave, Harrison, Lentz, King, Engel 

ENG 468 American Romanticism. 3(3-0) F. Major American writers from 1825 to 1865. 

E. Clark, J. Clark, Stein, West, Grimwood 

ENG 469 American Realism and Naturalism. 3(3-0) S. Major American writers from 
1865 to 1935. E. Clark, J. Clark, Stein, West, Grimwood 

ENG 480 Modern Drama. 3(3-0) F. Major plays from Ibsen to Albee. 

Halperen, Reynolds 

ENG 485 Shakespeare. 3(3-0) F,S. Principal plays with emphasis on the development of 
the playwright. Blank, Hester, Wall, P. Williams, M. Williams, Baines 

ENG 486 Shakespeare, The Earlier Plays. 3(3-0) F. May be taken (in conjunction with 
ENG 487) as alternate for ENG 485 in LAN and LTN curricula. A study of Shakespeare's 
major works before 1600 with emphasis on the development of the playwright. Credit will not 
be given for both ENG 485 and 486. 

Baines, Blank, Hester, Wall, M. Williams, P. Williams 

ENG 487 Shakespeare, The Later Plays. 3(3-0) S. May be taken (in conjunction with 
ENG 486) as alternate for ENG 485 in LAN and LTN curricula. A study of Shakespeare's 
major works after 1600 emphasis on the development of Shakespeare's tragedy and the end of 
his career. Credit will not be given for both ENG 485 and 487. 

Baines, Blank, Hester, Wall, M. Williams, P. Williams 

ENG 496 Seminar in Literature. Preq: Junior standing and consent of department. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Designed to provide closely supervised small-group study of a topic in literature 
resulting in a substantial essay or series of essays by each student on an aspect of the topic. 
Topics vary each semester; consult department for details. Staff 

ENG 498 Special Topics in English. Preq: Six hours ENG above the fr. level. 1-6 F,S. 
Detailed investigation of a topic in language or literature. Topic and mode of study deter- 
mined by faculty member in consultation with English department head. Staff 



238 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENG 504 Problems in College Composition. Preq: Appointment as a teaching assistant 
in English. 0(0-0) F. Directed study of the development of rhetorical skills in composition in 
classroom situations. Smith 

ENG 524 Modern English Usage. Preq: Upper division or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. 
English grammar, with attention to new developments in structural linguistics and with 
emphasis on current usage. Meyers, Short 

ENG 526 History of the English Language. Preq: Upper division or grad. standing. 3(3- 
0) S. Growth and development of the language from its Indo-European beginnings to the pre- 
sent. Offered in alternate years. A section designated 526H, restricted to Teacher Certifica- 
tion English majors, will be offered every semester. Holley, Meyers, Short 

ENG 561 Milton. Preq: Upper division or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Intensive reading of 
Milton with attention to background materials in the history and culture of 17th-century 
England. F. Moore, White 

ENG 575 Southern Writers. Preq: Upper division or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Contribu- 
tion of the South to American literature, with intensive study of selected major figures. 

Lucas, MacKethan, Reynolds 

ENG 578 English Drama to 1642. Preq: Upper division or grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. 
English drama from its liturgical beginnings to the closing of the theatres, excluding 
Shakespeare. Meyers, M. Williams, Baines 

ENG 579 English Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century.Preq: Upper divi- 
sion or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. English drama from 1660 to 1800. Durant, F. Moore 

ENG 590 Literary Criticism. Preq: Upper division or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. The critical 
process as it leads to the definition and analysis of literature, together with attention to the 
main literary traditions and conventions. Holley, P. Williams 

Entomology 

ENT 201 Insects and Man. 2(2-0) F. The ways in which insects affect our lives today and 
how man deals with them, how they have altered the course of history, and how we may learn 
from them in studying their ability to adapt to their changing environments. The aesthetic 
and avocational aspects of insects. Intended for students not in biological sciences. 

Moore 

ENT 301 Introduction to Forest Insects. Preq: FOR 264. 3(2-2) F. Covers the fundamen- 
tals of classification, development, habits and control of forest insects. Farrier 
ENT 312 Introduction to Economic Insects. 3(2-2) F,S. The fundamentals of insect 
classification, development, food habits and controls. 

Moore 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT (ZO) 401 Bibliographic Research in Biology. Preq: Advanced undergraduate or 
graduate standing. 1(1-0) F. A general course intended to acquaint students with literature 
problems of the scientist, mechanics of the library book classifications, bibliographies, 
abstract journals, taxonomic indexes and preparation of scientific papers in agriculture, 
forestry, biology and their subdivisions. Farrier 

ENT (BS) 410 Biology of Insects. Preq: ZO 201 or 202. 3(2-2) F.Sum. Brings together 
current knowledge concerning major functional, behavioral, adaptive characteristics of in- 
sects, stresses the underlying biological principles. Yamamoto 
FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT 502 Insect Diversity. Preq: Twelve hours of biology. 4(2-4) F. The external 
morphology of insects and a survey of the biology and identification of immature and adult 
insects. Evolutionary relationships of insects and other arthropods, speciation, nomen- 
clature, and classical and recent approaches to systematics considered. 

Baker, Neunzig, Young 

ENT 503 Functional Systems of Insects. Preq: Twelve hours of biology, nine hours of 
chemistry, three hours of biochemistry, ENT 301 or equivalent. 4(2-6) S. The morphology, 

239 



histology and function of the organ systems of insects. Sensory and general physiology lead 
into basic elements of insect orientation and behavior. Campbell, Hodgson, Yamamoto 

ENT 504 Insect Morphology. Preq: ENT 502. 3(1-4) F. External morphology, primary 
and comparative phases, with emphasis on knowledge and techniques which can be applied 
to specific problems. (Offered F 1977 and alt. years.) Young 

ENT 511 Systematic Entomology. Preq: ENT 301 or 312 or equivalent. 3(1-4) F. A 
detailed survey of the orders and families of adult insects, to acquaint the student with those 
groups and develop ability in the use of the taxonomic literature. (Offered F 1978 and alt. 
years.) Young 

ENT 520 Insect Pathology. Preq: Introductory entomology and introductory micro- 
biology. 3(2-3) S. A treatment of the noninfectious and infectious diseases of insects, the 
etiological agents and infectious processes involved, immunological responses and applica- 
tions. (Offered S 1977 and alt. years.) Brooks 
ENT 531 Insect Ecology. Preq: ENT 502. 3(2-2) F. The environmental relations of insects, 
including insect development, habits, distribution and abundance. Rabb, Stinner 

ENT 541 Immature Insects. Preq: ENT 502 or equivalent. 2(1-3) F. An advanced study of 
the immature stages of selected orders of insects with emphasis on generic and specific taxa. 
Primary consideration of the larval stage, but a brief treatment of eggs and pupae. (Offered F 
1978 and alt. years.) Neunzig 

ENT 542 Acarology. Preq: ENT 301 or 312, or ZO 201. 3(2-3) S. A systematic survey of the 
mites and ticks with emphasis on identification, biology and control of the more common and 
economic forms attacking material, plants and animals including man. (Offered S 1977 and 
alt. years.) Farrier 

ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect Control. Preq: ENT 312 or 301. 3(2-2) F. The principles 
underlying modern methods for protecting food, clothing, shelter and health from insect 
attack. Guthrie 

ENT 562 Agricultural Entomology. Preq: ENT 301 or 312. 3(2-3) S. The taxonomy, 
biology and ecology of beneficial and injurious insects and mites of agricultural crops. Ad- 
vantages and limitations of the advanced concepts for controlling insect and mite popula- 
tions on different crops. (Offered S 1977 and alt. years.) Bradley, Rock 
ENT (PHY, ZO) 575 Physiology of Invertebrates. 3(3-0) F. (See zoology, page 329.) 
ENT (ZO) 582 Medical and Veterinary Entomology. Preq: ENT 301 or 312 and ZO 315 
or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. The morphology, taxonomy, biology and control of the arthropod 
parasites and disease vectors of man and animals. The ecology and behavior of vectors in 
relation to disease transmission and control. (Offered S 1978 and alt. years.) Axtell 
ENT 590 Special Problems. Preq: CI. Credits Arranged F,S. Original research on special 
problems in entomology not related to a thesis problem. Provides experience and training in 
research. Staff 

Food Science 

FS 201 Food Science and Man's Food. 3(3-0) F,S. An introduction to the science and 
practice of providing man with a wholesome, nutritious, economical and readily available 
supply of basic and processed foodstuffs. Topics will include: man's struggle for food; 
chemical nature of foods; microorganisms and foods; safety of foods; principles of food preser- 
vation and processing; organic and health foods; nutrition and the consumer; world food 
problem. Warren 

FS (ANS, NTR) 301 Nutrition and Man. 3(3-0) F,S. (See animal science, page 189.) 
FS 331 Food Engineering. Preq: PY 211 or 221. 3(2-3) F. Engineering concepts applica- 
tion to the food industry. Principles of thermodynamics, fluid flow, heat transfer, refrigera- 
tion and electricity. Jones 
FS 400 Foods and Nutrition. Preq: CH 220. 3(3-0) S. The sources and properties of 
nutrients for man will be studied. Factors affecting the supply and availability of foods will 
also be considered. Methods of handling, procuring and preserving foods and the changes in 
the values and characteristics of nutrients resulting from these processes will be 
emphasized. Aurand 

240 



FS 402 Food Chemistry. Preq: CH 220 or 221. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to the biochemistry 
of foods emphasizing basic composition, structure, properties and nutritive value. The 
chemistry of changes occurring during processing and utilization of foods. Giddings 

FS (PO) 404 Poultry Products. Preq: CH 220 or 221. 3(2-3) F. The composition, quality, 
processing and preservation of poultry meat and eggs. Ball 

FS (MB) 405 Food Microbiology. Preq: MB 401. 3(2-3) F. The micro organisms of impor- 
tance in foods, and their cultural and metabolic activities. The physical and chemical 
destruction of microorganisms in foods and kinetics involved. The conversion of raw foods by 
microorganisms into altered foods, and the nutrition, growth and preservation of the culture 
involved. Foods as vectors of human pathogens. The evolution of microbiological standards 
for foods. Speck, Gilliland 

FS (ANS) 409 Meat and Meat Products. Preq: CH 220. 3(2-3) S. The basic principles in- 
volved in processing beef, pork and lamb from the live animal to the various representative 
cured, fresh, canned and comminuted meat items currently produced. Blumer 

FS (BAE) 432 Food Engineering II. Preq: FS (BAE) 331. 3(2-3) S. The theory and prin- 
ciples of evaporation, drying and distillation with emphasis on applications in food process- 
ing. Instrumentation and control systems used in the food industry. Jones 

FS 490 Food Science Seminar. Preq: Sr. standing. 1(1-0) F. A review and discussion of 
scientific articles, new developments and topics of current interest. Roberts, Warren 

FS 491 Special Topics in Food Science. Preq: Sr. standing or CI. 1-6 F,S,Sum. Topics are 
selected or assigned. Study of current topics and/or problems to gain additional knowledge 
and interpretative experience in a specific area. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FS 503 Food Analysis. Preq: CH 315, BCH 351, FS 402. 3(1-6) S. The principles, methods 
and techniques necessary for quantitive physical and chemical analyses of food and food 
products. Results of analyses studied and evaluated in terms of quality standards and gover- 
ning regulations. Staff 

FS 504 Food Proteins and Enzymes. Preq: FS 402 or BCH 351. 3(2-3) F. An advanced 
course in food chemistry with emphasis on proteins and enzymes of particular importance to 
foods will be presented. Protein interactions and their effect on the physical-chemical 
characteristics of a product will be discussed. Particular emphasis will be given to the 
preparation and kinetic properties of immobilized enzymes and their use as biochemical 
reactors in processing operations or as specific electrodes for analytical purposes. Swaisgood 

FS (MB) 506 Advanced Food Microbiology. Preq: FS 405 or equivalent. 3(1-6) S. The in- 
teractions of microorganisms in foods and their roles in food spoilage and bioprocessing. 
Cellular and molecular relationships in bacterial injury, repair and aging resulting from en- 
vironmental stresses. Bacterial sporulations, germination, and physiological properties of 
bacterial spores. Gilliland 

FS 51 1 Food Research and Development. Preq: FS (BAE) 331, FS 402, FS (MB) 405. 3(2- 
3) S. A study of the scientific principles underlying the development of new and improved 
food products and processes. The study of scientific food industry problems by the case 
method. Special emphasis on the application of research and development principles to 
meat, poultry, and fisheries industries. Webb 

FS 516 Quality Control of Food Products. Preq: FS 331, 402, 405. 3(2-3) S. Quality con- 
trol fundamentals in the food industry including specifications and standards, testing 
procedures, sampling, statistical and quality control and organization. Food products and in- 
dustry problems used in the presentation with emphasis on dairy products. Hansen 

FS (HS) 521 Food Preservation. Preq: MB 401 or FS 405. FS 402 or BO 421. 3(2-3) F. 
Principles and methods in food preservation. Emphasis on thermal, freezing, drying and fer- 
mentation processes and their relationship to physical, chemical and organoleptic changes in 
product. The relationship of these preservation techniques t<> the development of an overall 
processing operation. ( ""roll 

FS (HS) 562 Post-Harvest Physiology. 3(3-0) S. (See horticultural science, page 259.) 
FS (BAE) 585 Biorheology. (See biological and agricultural engineering, page 193.) 

241 



FS 591 Special Problems in Food Science. Preq: Grad. or sr. standing. 1-6 F,S,Sum. 
Analysis of scientific, engineering and economic problems of current interest. The scientific 
appraisal and solution of a selected problem. Problems designed to provide training and ex- 
periences in research. Staff 

Foreign Languages 

NOTE: All students with precious knowledge of French, German or Spanish must take the 
placement test upon entering the University. They will be given advanced standing and 
receive credit according to their score. 

CLASSICS 

GRK 101 Elementary Greek I. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to Classical Greek. A study of the 
Greek alphabet, three declensions, conjugation of regular and some irregular verbs. Readings 
based on Greek mythology, philosophy and literature. 

GRK 102 Elementary Greek II. Preq: GRK 101. 3(3-0) S. After a brief review of conjuga- 
tions and declensions, this course takes up the study of the middle voice, uses of optative and 
subjunctive, infinitive, aorist, future tenses and genitives, plus other syntactical and 
morphological phenomena. Readings from Plato, the New Testament, Xenophen, 
Herodotus. 

GRK 201 Intermediate Greek I. Preq: GRK 102. 3(3-0) F. An introduction to Greek prose, 
with emphasis on increasing reading skill through vocabulary acquisition and the study of 
complex grammatical structures. Plato's Apology, Crito, and selections from the Phaedo are 
read. The relationship of the Platonic writings to other Greek literature is examined through 
reading in translation selections from the Greek orators, historians, poets, and playwrights. 
GRK 202 Intermediate Greek II. Preq: GRK 201 3(3-0) S. A study of the techniques of 
oral poetry, the use of myth, and the literary and historical significance of Homer's Iliad and 
the New Testament. An analysis of differences between classical and Koine Greek. 

GRK 320 Greek Tragedy in Translation. 3(3-0) S. A study of the tragedies of Aeschylus, 
Sophocles, and Euripides in translation. Discussions of the literary and social aspects of the 
individual plays and of the tragic genre in the fifth century. Examination of selections in 
Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and Seneca which discuss or reflect Greek tragedy. 

LAT 101 Elementary Latin I. 3(3-0) F. Introduction Classical Latin. Study of five declen- 
sions, present and perfect systems of four conjugations, some irregular verbs and basic syn- 
tax. Readings from Roman and Greek mythology. 

LAT 102 Elementary Latin II. Preq: LAT 102. 3(3-0) F. Continuation and expansion of 
LAT 101. Various subjunctive uses, active and passive periphrastic conjugations, conditional 
sentences. Readings from various classical writers. 

LAT 201 Intermediate Latin I. Preq: LAT 102. 3(3-0) F. An introduction to Latin prose 
and poetry. The emphasis is on increased reading skill. A review of grammar fundamentals 
and an introduction to more complex syntactical structures. The cultural significance of the 
various readings is examined. An oral report, short paper, and translation exercise are 
required. 

LAT 202 Intermediate Latin II. Preq: LAT 201. 3(3-0) S. A study of the lyric poetry of 
Catullus and Horace emphasizing vocabulary, syntax, and techniques of Latin verse. The 
traditions and the evolution of lyric poetry and the social role of the Roman poet are 
discussed. 

NOTE: Following courses conducted in the target language, except where otherwise stated. 

FLF301, 302; FLG 301, 302; FLR 303, 304; FLS 301, 302, 303, 304 may be used to satisfy the 
literature requirement in undergraduate degrees. FL 250 courses may be used to satisfy the 
area elective in Liberal Arts. 

ENGLISH FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS 

FLE 101 Foreign Language English: Review Grammar. Preq: Departmental placement 

tests. 3(3-1) F,S. Emphasis is on pronunciation, grammar and comprehension of American 

English. 



242 



FLE 102 Foreign Language English: Writing. Preq: Departmental placement tests. 3(3- 

1) F,S. Emphasis is on writing, through the study of American English syntax with extensive 
written exercises; additional practice in spelling. 

FLE 103 Foreign Language English: Conversation. Preq: Departmental placement 
tests. 3(3-1) F,S. For foreign students who have studied English but need additional conver- 
sational practice. Emphasis on correct pronunciation, intonation and idiomatic expressions. 
Oral drills, class discussions and laboratory practice. 

FLE 104 Foreign Language English: Reading Improvement. Preq: Departmental 
placement tests. 1(1-0) S. This course is designed for foreign students who need to improve 
their reading speed and comprehension in order to perform effectively in other academic 
courses. Timed drills and practices teach the students to respond rapidly and accurately to 
increasingly longer units of writing. Use of the dictionary and vocabulary building exercises 
are also included. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

FL 101 Self-Instructional Elementary Language I. Preq: Consent of coordinator. 3(6-2) 
F,S,Sum. Study through self-instructional methods of a foreign language not otherwise 
taught in the department. Students work with native speakers and proceed at their own 
pace. Admission to the program is limited to highly motivated students and is determined by 
a language aptitude test and an interview with the program coordinator. 

FL 102 Self-Instructional Elementary Language II. Preq: Consent of coordinator. 3(6-2) 
F,S,Sum. (See course description under FL 101). 

FL 201 Self-Instructional Intermediate Language II. Preq: Consent of coordinator. 3(6- 

2) F,S,Sum. (See course description under FL 101). 

FL 202 Self-Instructional Intermediate Language II. Preq: Consent of coordinator. 
3(6-2) F,S,Sum. (See course description under FL 101). 

FL 298 Special Topics in Foreign Languages and Literatures. Preq: Consent of depart- 
ment. 1-3 F,S. A special projects course to be utilized for supervised work in language and 
literature when no scheduled course is appropriate. 

FL 498 Special Topics in Foreign Languages and Literatures. Preq: Consent of depart- 
ment. 1-6 F,S. A detailed investigation of a special topic in language and/or literature. Topic, 
mode of st'idy and variable credit to be determined by the faculty member in consultation 
with the head of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

FRENCH 

FLF 101 Elementary French I. 3(3-0) F,S. The beginning course for developing language 

skills. Oral and written practice in classroom and language laboratory. 

FLF 102 Elementary French II. Preq: FLF 101 3(3-0) F,S. A continuation of FLF 101, 
with oral and written practice in classroom and language laboratory. 
FLF 201 Intermediate French I. Preq: FLF 102. 3(3-0) F,S. The third of four consecutive 
courses to build skills of speaking, understanding, reading and writing French. Oral and writ- 
ten practice in classroom and language laboratory. 

FLF 202 Intermediate French II. Preq: FLF 201. 3(3-0) F,S. Last of the foundation 
courses in French. Greater emphasis on reading and writing. 

FLF 203 French Conversation. Preq: FLF 102. 1(1-0) F,S. Practice in spoken French, 
emphasizing active use of the language in a variety of situations. The student is encouraged 
to increase vocabulary, while developing greater fluency and ease in the structural patterns 
of the language. May be repeated to a maximum of three credit hours. 
FLF 251 Exoticism and the Fantastic in French Literature. Preq: FLF 102. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Readings in English and in French translation of selected works, with stress on critical, 
philosophical and entertainment value. Detailed explication de texte of short passages. 
FLF 257 Conventional and Avant-Garde in Contemporary French Drama. Preq: FLF 
102. 3(3-0) F,S. Readings in English and in French translation of selected plays of the 20th 
century, with stress on works assimilated from Greek Tragedy, the Avant-Garde and Con- 
ventional Theater. 

243 



FLF 301 Survey of French Literature, Origins to 1800. Preq: FLF 202. 3(3-0) F. 
Readings of representative works with analytical and critical emphasis. Lectures, written 
and oral reports. 

FLF 302 Survey of French Literature, 1800 to Present. Preq: FLF 202. 3(3-0) S. 
Readings of representative works with analytical and critical emphasis. Lectures, written 
and oral reports. 

FLF 309 Advanced French Conversation and Phonetics. Preq: FLF 202. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Study of sound production and phonological terminology. Daily conversational practice in 
classroom. Prose and poetry readings. 

FLF 310 Advanced French Grammar. Preq: FLF 202. 3(3-0) F.S. Thorough and in-depth 
study of French syntax with extensive written practice. Required of French majors. 

FLF 315 French Civilization and Culture. Preq: FLF 202. 3(3-0) F. Taught in French. 
This course provides a background in French civilization and culture, through reading, dis- 
cussion and presentation of the social, economic and political structures of France, along 
with its geography, history, music and art. 

FLF 322 French Novel Before World War II. Preq: FLF 202. 3(3-0) F,S. Readings of 
French novelists from 1900 to 1940. Lectures, written and oral reports. 

FLF 323 Contemporary French Novel. Preq: FLF 202. 3(3-0) F,S. Readings of French 
novelists from 1945 to the present. Lectures, written and oral reports. 

FLF 324 Contemporary French Theater. Preq: FLF 202. 3(3-0) F,S. Representative plays 
with stress on ideas, philosophies, and trends in France and other countries. 
FLF 350 Modern European Literary Criticism. Preq: Six hours of literature. 3(3-0) F,S. 
A study of modern European literary criticism paralleling the major modern philosophical 
systems, as theoretical bases, and based on an examination of major French critics, as ap- 
plied methods. These methods are applied to several texts by French authors covering 
various genres. Taught in English. 

FLF 411 French Literature of the 17th Century- Preq: CI. 3(3-0) F,S. Analytical and 
critical study of writings of French Classicism. Lectures, written and oral reports. 

FLF 412 French Literature of the 18th Century. Preq: CI. 3(3-0) F,S. Analytical and 
critical study of writings of the Age of Rationalism and Revolution. Lectures, written and oral 
reports. 

FLF 491 Special Topics in French Studies. Preq: Consent of the department. 3(3-0) F,S. 
A concentrated study of a special period, author or genre, to be determined as needed in the 
major program. 

FLF 492 Special Topics in French Studies. Preq: Consent of department. 3(3-0) F,S. A 
concentrated study of a special period, author or genre, to be determined as needed in the 
major program. 

FOR GRADUATE CERTIFICATION 

This course does not carry undergraduate credit. 

FLF 401 French for Graduate Students. 3(3-0) F. Designed to prepare students for 
graduate certification, this course will introduce students to basic vocabulary and structures. 
Frequent practice in translation. Certification is granted on satisfactory completion of the 
course. 

GERMAN 

FLG 101 Elementary German I. 3(3-0) F,S. The first in a four-course sequence intended 
to teach the student to understand, speak, read and write everyday German. Emphasis on 
speaking and understanding with additional reading of cultural materials. Intensive practice 
in the language lab. 

FLG 102 Elementary German II. Preq: FLG 101. 3(3-0) F,S. Strong emphasis is placed on 
understanding and speaking, but increasing attention is given to syntax and vocabulary 
building. 

FLG 201 Intermediate German I. Preq: FLG 102. 3(3-0) F.S. The third of four con- 
secutive courses. Intensive conversational drill to build the students' ability to understand 
and speak everyday German. Supplementary readings in German literature. 

244 



FLG 202 Intermediate German II. Preq: FLG 201. 3(3-0) F,S. Last of four sequential 
courses. Continued use of everyday spoken German but greater emphasis on reading and 
writing. 

FLG 254 The Novelle From Goethe to the First World War. Preq: FLG 102. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Study of a major form of German prose fiction from Goethe to Thomas Mann. Class conduc- 
ted in English with readings in German and in English translation. 

FLG 255 Twentieth Century Germanic Drama. Preq: FLG 102. 3(3-0) F,S. Significant 
plays of Central and Northern Europe during the 20th century especially as they reflect 
socio-economic changes. Class conducted in English with readings in German and in English 
translation. 

FLG 301 Survey of German Literature: Middle Ages to 1800. Preq: FLG 202. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Readings of representative works with analytical and critical emphasis. Lectures, class dis- 
cussions, papers. 

FLG 302 Survey of German Literature: 1800 to World War I. Preq: FLG 202. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Readings of significant authors, including the Romantic, Realist and Impressionist periods. 

FLG 309 Advanced German Conversation and Phonetics. Preq: FLG 202. 3(3-0) F,S. In- 
tensive conversational practice in class and language laboratory based on current topics, and 
a study of sound production and linguistic terminology. 

FLG 310 Advanced German Syntax and Composition. Preq: FLG 202 or equivalent. 3(3- 
0) F. A study of advanced points in German syntax not normally studied in depth during the 
two years of beginning and intermediate courses. Students write controlled exercises and 
assigned and free compositions. Includes a bibliographical practicum. 

FLG 322 Major German Modern Writers. Preq: FLG 202. 3(3-0) F. A study of major 
authors of the 20th century whose reputation was established prior to World War II, in- 
cluding Hauptman, Schnitzler, Hofmannstahl, Hesse, Mann, Kafka, Brecht. 

FLG 323 Contemporary German Literature. Preq: FLG 202. 3(3-0) S. A study of 
German-speaking authors whose reputation has been established since the Second World 
War and those whose works are now gaining attention. 

GRADUATE CERTIFICATION 

TTii's course does not carry undergraduate credit. 

FLG 401 German for Graduate Students. Not open to undergrads. 3(3-0) F. Designed to 
prepare students for graduate certification, this course will introduce students to basic 
vocabulary and structure. Completion of the course will certify the student's reading 
knowledge. 

ITALIAN 

FLI 101 Elementary Italian I. 3(3-0) F,S. Concentrating on listening and speaking, this 
course begins the development of a balanced foundation on all four language skills. 
Idiomatic, everyday Italian is emphasized. Class and laboratory practice, written homework. 

FLI 102 Elementary Italian II. Preq: FLI 101. 3(3-0) F,S. Emphasis mainly of acquisiton 
of oral skills through class practice and use of audio aids. Readings of simple Italian prose. 

FLI 201 Intermediate Italian I. Preq: FLI 102. 3(3-0) F,S. The third of four consecutive 
courses. Its principal aim is to teach everyday, idiomatic Italian. Selected readings from con- 
temporary Italian authors. 

FLI 202 Intermediate Italian II. Preq: FLI 201. 3(3-0) F,S. Study of more advanced 
aspects of Italian, completing the learning of the foundation of the language. Readings from 
contemporary Italian authors; practice in intermediate composition. 

PORTUGUESE 

FLP 105 Elementary Intensive Portuguese. 6(6-0) F. Intensive introduction to Brazilian 

Portuguese, with emphasis on the speaking and listening skills. 

FLP 205 Intermediate Intensive Portuguese. Preq: FLP 105. 6(6-0) S. Intensive study of 

Brazilian Portuguese on the intermediate level with refinement of the listening and speaking 

skills and introduction of the reading and writing skills. 

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RUSSIAN 

FLR 101 Elementary Russian I. 3(3-0) F,S. The first of four sequential courses. Students 
are introduced to the basic language skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. In- 
itial emphasis is on the two first, or oral, skills. Class and laboratory practice; written 
assignments. 

FLR 102 Elementary Russian II. Preq: FLR 101. 3(3-0) F,S. Main emphasis on acquisi- 
tion of basic oral skills, with complementary reading and writing exercises. Class and 
laboratory practice; written assignments. 

FLR 201 Intermediate Russian I. Preq: FLR 102. 3(3-0) F,S. The learning of basic skills 
is continued. More emphasis than previously will be given to writing, but conversational 
practice is essential. Readings in Russian prose of intermediate level. Class and laboratory 
practice; written assignments. 

FLR 202 Intermediate Russian II. Preq: FLR 201. 3(3-0) F,S. Study of more advanced 
aspects of Russian syntax through reading of prose of Russian writers. Continued attention to 
conversational practice and vocabulary building. 

FLR 303 Russian Literature in Translation I. 3(3-0) F,S. This course offers an introduc- 
tion to Russian writers of the 19th century, such as Turgenev, Gogol, Lermontov, Pushkin, 
Dostoevsky, Tolstoy. Class conducted in English. 

FLR 304 Russian Literature in Translation II. 3(3-0) F,S. An introduction to Russian 
writers of the 20th century: Gorky, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, Babel, Sholokov, Maiakovsky, 
etc. Class conducted in English. 

SPANISH 

FLS 101 Elementary Spanish I. 3(3-0) F,S. Concentrating on listening and speaking, this 
course begins the development of a balanced foundation in all four language skills. Idiomatic, 
everyday Spanish is emphasized. Class practice, laboratory and written homework. 

FLS 102 Elementary Spanish II. Preq: FLS 101. 3(3-0) F,S. This course expands use of 
Spanish through past tenses, regular and irregular, and various morphological and syntac- 
tical aspects. Emphasis on oral skills. Written work and laboratory practice assigned daily. 

FLS 201 Intermediate Spanish I. Preq: FLS 102. 3(3-0) F,S. The third of four consecutive 
courses. As with 101 and 102, its aim is mainly to teach idiomatic, spoken Spanish. Reading 
and writing skills receive greater attention than previously. Class practice, laboratory and 
written assignment. 

FLS 202 Intermediate Spanish II. Preq: FLS 201. 3(3-0) F,S. Last of four sequential 
courses, completing the learning of the foundations of the language. Writing will receive 
greater attention. 

FLS 203 Spanish Conversation. Preq: FLS 102 1(1-0) F,S,Sum. Practice in spoken 
Spanish. The student is required to actively use the language in a variety of situations and is 
encouraged to acquire a wide range of immediately practical words and expressions suitable 
for business or travel purposes. The course may be repeated to a maximum of three times for 
credit. 

FLS 252 The Theme of Desengano in Spanish Literature. Preq: FLS 102. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Comprehensive study of theme of desengano in its different manifestations, mainly through 
the picaresque novel, barogue poetry and drama, Don Quixote, Unamuno and A. Machado. 
Course conducted in English with readings in Spanish and in English translation. 

FLS 256 Alienation in the Modern Hispanic World. Preq: FLS 102. 3(3-0) F,S. A study 
of cultural attitudes in the Hispanic countries through readings of selected Spanish and 
Spanish-American essays, novels and stories. Course conducted in English with readings in 
Spanish and in English translation. 

FLS 301 Survey of Spanish Literature Through Golden Age. Preq: FLS 202. 3(3-0) F. 
Analysis of major literary works through 1700. The study will have two main projections: 
aesthetic, through consideration of elements of artistic creation, criticism and genres; 
cultural, in relating works to spatial and temporal circumstance. 

FLS 302 Survey of Spanish Literature: 1700 to Present. Preq: FLS 202. 3(3-0) S. In- 
troduction to the study of Spanish Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and subsequent 
literary production. Special attention to the quest for new values in contemporary literature. 

246 



FLS 303 Latin American Literature I. Preq: FLS 202. 3(3-0) F. Survey of literary pro- 
duction in Spanish-American countries from pre-Hispanic to 1800. Special attention to the 
Baroque and the Romantic periods to 1800. Lectures, class discussions, papers. 

FLS 304 Latin American Literature II. Preq: FLS 202. 3(3-0) S. Introduction to the 
study of American literature in the Spanish language from Modernism to Garcia Marquez. 
Lectures, class discussions, papers. 

FLS 309 Spanish Phonetics and Advanced Conversation. Preq: FLS 202. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Through discussions on relevant topics, class will concentrate on improving students' fluency 
in spoken Spanish. Study of main phenomena of sound production and relevant linguistic 
terminology. 

FLS 310 Spanish Syntax and Composition. Preq: FLS 202. 3(3-0) F.S. A thorough study 
of the more advanced aspects of the grammar of the Spanish language, with extensive prac- 
tice in writing. Lectures, discussion, compositions. 

FLS 315 The Culture and Civilization of Spain and Portugal. Preq: FLS 202. 3(3-0) F. 
Taught in Spanish. The study of the Iberian Peninsula as a crossroads of civilization from 
early times to the present. The emergence of Spain as a nation, the rise and fall of the 
Spanish Empire, the contemporary political situation in Spain and Portugal. Films, 
recordings, slides, and visiting speakers illustrate those cultural characteristics unique to the 
Iberians. 

FLS 316 The Culture and Civilization of Latin America. Preq: FLS 202. 3(3-0) S. 
Taught in Spanish. This course surveys the rich cultural traditions of Latin America. 
Through readings, slides, films, and recordings, the variety and complexity of the Latin 
Americans' cultural heritage is demonstrated. 

FLS 323 Contemporary Spanish Literature. Preq: FLS 302. 3(3-0) F. An in-depth study 
of Spanish prose writing from the Generation of 98 through the present. Special attention to 
post-Civil War authors such as Laforet, Cela, Goytisolo, etc. Lectures, discussions, term 
paper. 

FLS 403 Cervantes. Preq: CI. 3(3-0) F. Around the central consideration of Don Quixote's 
definition of his role as knight errant, this course considers the works of Cervantes and 
related writers. The development of the novel as a genre is examined as part of the question 
of human personality and of its social determinants in the Renaissance. 

FLS 404 Drama of the Golden Age. Preq: CI. 3(3-0) S. After a brief introduction to 
medieval and early Renaissance drama, this course considers the rise and development of the 
Spanish stage from Lope de Vega to the late 17th century. Lectures, discussion, term paper. 

FLS 491 Special Topics in Hispanic Studies. Preq: FLS 309, 310 or consent of the depart- 
ment. 3(3-0) F. A concentrated study of a special period, author or genre, to be determined as 
needed in the major program. 

FLS 492 Special Topics in Hispanic Studies. Preq: FLS 309, 310 or consent of the depart- 
ment. 3(3-0) A concentrated study of a special period, author or genre, to be determined as 
needed in the major program. 

GRADUATE CERTIFICATION 

This course does not carry undergraduate credit. 

FLS 401 Spanish for Graduate Students. Not open to undergrads. 3(3-0) F. Designed to 
prepare students for graduate certification, this course introduces students to basic 
vocabulary and structures. Frequent practice in translation. Certification is granted on 
satisfactory completion of the course. 

Forestry 

FOR 101 Introduction to Forestry. 1(1-1) F. Introduction to the School of Forest 
Resources, to the profession of forestry and to career opportunities in forestry. Staff 

FOR 201 Introduction to Forest Mensuration. 2(1-2) F,S. Theory, principles and techni- 
ques of instrumentation relative to the collection and presentation of forest data. Staff 
FOR 204 Silviculture. Summer camp. Preq: Jr. standing in FOR. 2(0-6) Sum. Field exer- 
cises to enable the student to describe and measure factors of the forest environment, the 

247 



ecology of forest communities, tree structure and growth, and tree and stand response to 
treatments which are normal parts of forest management operations. Staff 

FOR 210 Dendrology-Gymnosperms. Preq: BO 200. 2(1-2) S. Identification, relation- 
ships and distribution of gymnosperm trees, emphasizing characteristics of genera and 
higher taxonomic groups. Duffield 

FOR 211 Dendrology- Angiosperms. Preq: BO 200. 2(1-2) F. Identification, relationships 
and distribution of angiosperm trees, emphasizing characteristics of genera and higher tax- 
onomic groups. Staff 
FOR (WPS) 219 Forest Economy and its Operation. Preq: EB 212 or 201. 3(2-2) F. Mul- 
tiple use concept of forestry; economic principles underlying production; investment 
problems; factors which influence demand for forest products. Steensen 
FOR 263 Dendrology. Summer camp. Preq: FOR 210, 211. 1(0-3) Sum. Identification of 
trees, shrubs and woody vines of the Piedmont and mountain regions of North Carolina, prin- 
cipally by bark, foliage, flowers and developing fruits. Staff 

FOR 264 Forest Protection. Summer camp. Preq: Jr. standing in FOR. 2(0-6) Sum. Iden- 
tification and control of forest insects and diseases. Behavior of fire and the meteorological 
factors affecting fire behavior, suppression of a large simulated fire, including use of modern 
ground equipment, aircraft and communications systems. Staff 

FOR 272 Forest Mensuration. 3(2-2) S. Scientific basis for the measurements and es- 
timates required in forest resources management and goods and services derived from forest 
land. Includes theory of measurements, the required procedures, instrumentation and 
statistical prerequisites, with emphasis on sampling problems. Steensen 

FOR (WPS) 273 Quantitative Methods in Forest Resources. Preq: Soph, standing. 3(2- 
2) F,S. Problem solving techniques in forestry, wood technology, pulp and paper technology 
and recreation resources. Historical development of past techniques, assessment of present 
technology, and an evaluation of problem solving tools, including an introduction to 
computers. Gemmer 

FOR 274 Mapping and Mensuration. Summer camp. Preq: FOR 272. 4(0-12) Sum. Use 
of surveying instruments and graphic methods in preparation of topographic and planimetric 
maps of forested areas. Measurement of height, diameter, bole form and age of trees. Study 
of stand density, growing stock levels and financial maturity. Stem analysis sampling and 
site index determination. Jervis, Steensen 

FOR 284 Utilization. Summer camp. Preq: Jr. standing in FOR. 1(0-3) Sum. Inspection 
of wood industries; expositions on manufacturing processes. Staff 

FOR (PP) 318 Forest Pathology. 4(3-2) S. (See plant pathology, page 297.) 
FOR 353 Air Photo Interpretation. Preq: Jr. standing. 3(2-3) S. Theory, principles and 
techniques of utilizing air photos as data sources for planning and management of renewable 
resources. Particular attention to stereoscopic identification and examination of the 
bioecological factors of terrain, plants, growing conditions, water, wildlife and the changes 
brought about by man's activities. Lammi 

FOR 405 Forest Land Management. Preq: FOR 272, 452. 5(2-6-2) F. Management of 
forest lands for multiple benefits. Principles and techniques in regulating regeneration, 
species composition, growth and quality of woody vegetation; use of planting, seeding, 
cutting, herbicides and fire in vegetation management. Application of financial principles to 
decisions regarding investments in forest management. Bryant 

FOR 406 Forest Land Inventory and Planning. Preq: FOR 405. 6(2-12) S. Applications 
of land management systems, including silviculture, protection, utilization and related 
problems in evaluation of assigned forest areas. Students complete a resource inventory and 
submit individual plans for management of the assigned tract. Bryant 

FOR 411 Forest Tree Improvement. Preq: Junior or senior standing in forestry. 3(3-0) F. 
Emphasis is on the value and implementation of tree improvement in forest management. 
Study is made of genetics of forest trees, natural variation and evolution of plants, use of in- 
digenous vs. exotic species, tree selection and propagation, seed orchard establishment and 
management, progeny testing, hardwood regeneration and management, site preparation, 
variation in wood properties and methods of maximizing fiber production. Kellison 

248 



FOR (WPS) 423 Logging and Milling. 3(2-3) F. (See wood and paper science, page 326.) 

FOR (WPS) 435 Systems Analysis in Forest Products. 3(3-0) S. (See wood and paper 
science, page 326.) 

FOR 452 Silvics. Preq: BO 200, CH 103, PY 221 or 212, mathematics through calculus. 
4(3-2) S. Forest production can be increased by manipulating the physical environment, the 
genotype and plant competition. The theoretical bases for these manipulations in applied 
ecology. p err y 

FOR 462 Artiflcal Forestation. 2(1-2) S. Biology of seed production by forest trees; forest 
tree seed collection, extraction, storage and testing; biology of tree seedling growth; soil 
aspects of nursery management; forest nursery operation; soil aspects of site preparation, 
planting and direct seeding; reforestation operations. (Offered S 1978 and alt. years.) 

Davey 
FOR 472 Renewable Resource Management. Preq: A basic course in biology and 
economics; jr. or sr. standing. 3(3-0) S. Concepts and problems of coordinated use and 
management of renewable resources — soil, water, vegetation and fauna. Man as a biological 
factor interacting with other components of terestrial ecological systems, particularly forests 
and related communities. Consideration of interrelationships of forests, water, range-land, 
wildlife and outdoor recreation and their aesthetic and economic values. Inventory and 
management techniques and economic policies relating to renewable resources. (Not open to 
FOR majors.) Staff 

FOR 491 Senior Problems in Forestry. Preq: Consent of department. Credits Arranged. 
Faculty-approved problems in management or technology. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FOR 501 Forest Influences and Watershed Management. Preq: Advanced undergrad. 
or grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. The effects of vegetation on climate, water and soil, with applica- 
tions of forest influences to management of forest land resources, including conservation and 
yield of water, stabilization of streamflow and soils, reduction of sedimentation and general 
improvement of the environment. Maki 

FOR 512 Forest Economics. Preq: Basic course in economics. 3(3-0) S. The setting and 
functioning of the forest economy. Topics include: supply and demand of industrial forest 
products and timber raw material; competition and pricing in the forest industries; com- 
petitive advantage of major forest regions; optimum rotation decision and financial returns 
to forest management; problems of timber production on non-industrial woodlands; 
economic analysis of non-timber forest products. Holley 

FOR 571 Advanced Forest Mensuration. Preq: FOR 272, ST 311. 3(2-2) S. The develop- 
ment of mathematical models to describe forest resources phenomena; criteria for evaluating 
the "goodness" of such models; and methods of data collection for use in the evaluation. 

Hafley 
FOR 572 Conservation Policy Issues. Preq: Advanced undergrad. or grad. standing. 3(3- 
0) S. Analysis of attitudes of selected private groups and public agencies toward multiple 
resource development. Attention to trends in development of forest resource policies, timber 
management objectives, private industry activity in forest development, recreation and mul- 
tiple use, education, research, watersheds, governmental activity, interaction in inter- 
national forestry affairs and the role of professional foresters and related specialists in multi- 
ple use resource management. Lammi 

FOR 591 Forestry Problems. Preq: Advanced undergrad. or grad. standing. Credits 
Arranged. Assigned or selected problems in silviculture, harvesting operations, lumber 
manufacturing, wood science, pulp and paper science, wood chemistry or forest manage- 
ment. Staff 

FOR 599 Methods of Research in Forestry. Preq: Advanced undergrad. or grad. 
standing. Credits Arranged. Research procedures, problem analysis, working plan prepara- 
tion, interpretation and presentation of results; evaluation of studies by forest research 
organizations; techniques and constraints in sample plots use. Staff 



249 



Genetics 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs. 3(3-0) F,S. Fundamental principles of genetics 
presented at a level not requiring courses in biological sciences but sufficient for un- 
derstanding the relation of genetics to society and technology. A survey of current knowledge 
of inheritance of human traits. McKenzie 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics. Preq: BS 100, Jr. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. An introduc- 
tory course. The physical and chemical basis of inheritance; genes as functional and struc- 
tural units of heredity and development; qualitative and quantitative aspects of genetics 
variation. Mettler 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory. Preq. or Coreq: GN 411. 1(0-2) F,S. Experi- 
ments and demonstrations provide an opportunity for practical experience in crossing and 
classifying a variety of genetic materials, particularly Drosophila. 

Mettler, Graduate Assistants 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 504 Human Genetics. Preq: GN 301 or 411, or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The basic princi- 
ples needed for an understanding of the genetics of man. Current knowledge and important 
areas of research in human genetics. Schaffer, McKenzie 

GN 505 A,B»C,L Genetics I. Preq: GN 411 or equivalent. 1-4 F. Lectures in genetic princi- 
ples presented as a series of five-week minicourses: GN 505A, qualitative genetics; GN 505B, 
microbial and biochemical genetics; GN 505C, cytogenetics. The laboratory, GN 505L, will 
involve experimental techniques in genetics, and will extend throughout the semester. Ma- 
jors and minors must enroll for the entire series. Others may enroll for specific minicourses, 
and attend first lecture of semester for schedule. Staff 

GN 506 A,B,C,L Genetics II. Preq: GN 411 or equivalent. 1-4 S. Lectures in genetic prin- 
ciples presented as a series of five-week minicourses: GN 506A, developmental genetics; GN 
506B, quantitative genetics; GN 506C, population genetics. The laboratory, GN 506L, will 
involve experimental techniques in genetics and will extend throughout the semester. Majors 
and minors must enroll for the entire series. Others may enroll for specific minicourses, and 
attend first lecture of semester for schedule. Staff 

GN (ANS) 508 Genetics of Animal Improvement. 3(3-0) S. (See animal science, page 
189.) 

GN (PO) 520 Poultry Breeding. 3(2-2) F. (See poultry science, page 302.) 

GN (ZO) 532 Biological Effects of Radiations. Preq: BS 100 or GN 301 or CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Qualitative and quantitative effects of radiations (other than the visible spectrum) on 
biological systems, to include both morphological and physiological aspects in a considera- 
tion of genetics, cytology, histology, and morphogenesis. Grosch 

GN (ZO) 540 Evolution. Preq: Nine credits in biological sciences. 3(3-0) F. The facts and 
theories of evolution in plants and animals. The causes and consequences of organic 
diversity. Smith 

GN (CS, HS) 541 Plant Breeding Methods. 3(3-0) F. (See crop science, page 210.) 

GN (CS, HS) 542 Plant Breeding Field Procedures. 2(0-4) Sum. (See crop science, page 
210.) 

GN (CS) 545 Origin and Evolution of Cultivated Plants. 2(2-0) S. (See crop science, 
page 210.) 

GN (ZO) 550 Experimental Evolution. Preq: GN 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. Processes examined 
at the inter- and intra-population levels. A review of the results from experimental popula- 
tion studies and analyses of natural populations concerning variation patterns and adapta- 
tion, natural selection, polymorphism, hybridization, introgression, population breeding 
structure, isolating mechanisms, etc., is made and interpreted in relation to Darwinian and 
modern concepts of the origin of species. (Offered 1975-76 and alt. years.) Staff 

GN (BCH, MB) 561 Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. Preq: BCH 351 or 551, GN 
250 



411 or 505, MB 401 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The development of the fields of biochemical 
genetics and microbial genetics emphasizing both techniques and concepts currently used in 
research. Lectures and discussions of current research publications. Armstrong 

Geology 

GY 101 General Physical Geology. Credit may not be considered for both GY 101 and 
120. 3(3-0) F,S. Systematic consideration of processes operating on and below the earth's sur- 
face and the resulting features of landscape, earth structures, and earth materials. Oc- 
currences and utilizatioon and below the earth's surface and the resulting features of 
landscape, earth structures, and earth materials. Occurrences and utilization of the earth's 
physical resources. Recommended that GY 110 be taken concurrently. 

GY 110 Physical Geology Laboratory. Coreq: GY 101 or 120. 1(0-2) F.S. The common 
rock forming minerals, the common rocks, topographic maps, geological structures and 
geologic maps. Field trips. 

GY 120 Elements of Physical Geology. Credit may not be obtained for both GY 101 and 
120. 2(2-0) F,S. Basic principles of physical geology. Major earth processes, principal geologic 
features, earth materials, and their interrelationships. Primarily intended for majors in dis- 
ciplines requiring a minimum practical working knowledge of geology. Recommended that 
GY 110 be taken concurrently. 

GY 208 Environmental Physical Geography. 3(3-0) F,S. Study of man's physical en- 
vironment and his relation to it. Topics include atmospheric and oceanic structure and cir- 
culation; weather and climate soils and landforms; volcano and earthquake hazards; interac- 
tion of air, sea and land; interaction of man and his environment; air and water pollution. 

GY 222 Historical Geology. Preq: GY 101 or 120. 3(2-2) S. Chronologic account of the 
geologic events during the development of the earth's crust, mainly in North America. Evolu- 
tion and environmental significance of the principal fossil animal and plant groups. Field 
trips. 

GY 323 Paleontology. Preq: GY 222. 3(2-3) F. Fossil life forms, with emphasis on 
classification and structure of the invertebrate animals and their application to problems of 
correlation of strata. Lecture, laboratories and field trips. 

GY 330 Crystallography and Mineralogy. Coreq: GY 101 or 120. 3(2-3) F. The elements 
of morphological crystallography. Space lattices, crystal symmetry, systems and classes. 
Stereographic projection of common forms. Identification of minerals by crystallographic 
features, cleavage, fracture, luster, color, streak, hardness, specific gravity, etc. Chemical 
composition, varieties, occurrence, associations, important localities and uses. Crystal struc- 
tures of selected minerals. 

GY 331 Optical Mineralogy and X-Ray Diffraction. Coreq: GY 101 or 120. 4(2-4) S. 
Techniques and underlying optical theory for identifying minerals with the polarizing 
microscope. Determination of index of refraction and birefringence; isotropic, uniaxial or 
biaxial character, optical sign and orientation. Adjunct apparatus for statistical and 
petrographic studies. Generation of x-rays, techniques and underlying theory for identifying 
by x-ray diffraction. 

GY 351 Structural Geology. Preq: GY 222 and 330. 3(2-3) S. Basic principles of rock 
mechanics; stress-strain analysis of deformed rocks. Nature and mechanisms of formation of 
joints, cleavage, faults, folds and other structural features of the earth's crust. Introduction 
to geotectonics. Field trips. 

GY 400 Environmental Geology. Preq: GY 101 or 120. 3(2-1) S. Man's effect upon and in- 
teraction with such processes as mass-wasting soil development, erosion, transport and 
deposition of sediments, surface waters, groundwater, volcanism and earthquakes. Environ- 
mental aspects of mineral and petroleum usage and waste disposal as affected by geologic 
processes and materials. 

GY 415 Mineral Exploration and Evaluation. Preq: GY 440, 452. 3(2-3) S. Application of 
the principles of geology, geophysics and geochemistry to the discovery and evalution of 
mineral deposits. Design of mineral exploration and development programs based on 
knowledge of the unique thermodynamic, geochemical and tectonic features that control 

251 



mineral formation and concentrations in well-known mining districts, especially those yield- 
ing ferrous, base and precious metals. Review of economic and technological factors govern- 
ing the value of mineral deposits. Field trips. 

GY 440 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. Preq: GY 331. 4(3-3) F. Rocks that are 
formed at high temperatures and pressures by crystallization or solidification of molten 
magma or by solid-state recrystallization of older rocks. Application of principles of phase- 
rule chemistry, and of the results of modern high pressure-temperature laboratory research 
on the stability fields of crystalline phases to an understanding of igneous and metamorphic 
rocks. Identification, classification, occurrence, and origin of the principal igneous and 
metamorphic rocks. 

GY 452 Sedimentary Petrology. Coreq: GY 331. 4(3-3) S. Identification, classification, 
geologic occurrences, origin and economic value of minerals, rocks and mineral deposits 
formed by physical, chemical and biological processes at low temperatures and pressures at 
and near the earth's surface. Hydrodynamics of sediment transport and deposition, settling 
velocities, and size sorting, chemical and biochemical precipitation from aqueous solutions. 
Principles of divisions of stratified terrains into natural units, correlation of strata, iden- 
tification of depositional environments, and facies analysis. 

GY 461 Engineering Geology. Preq: GY 101 or 120. 3(3-0) F. Applying geologic principles 
to engineering practice; analysis of geologic factors and processes affecting specific engineer- 
ing projects. (Offered F 1977 and alt. years.) 

GY 462 Field Geology. Preq: GY 351. 3(1-5) F. Methods of collecting geologic data and 
samples in the field. Introduction to the use of geologic surveying instruments. Basic geologic 
mapping. Preparation of geologic maps, cross sections, and geologic reports. 

GY 465 Geologic Field Camp. Preq: GY 351, 440, 452. 6. Sum. Six weeks summer field 

course. Field procedures and geologic instruments. Geological mapping of various geologic 

structures and terrains. Field trips. 

GY 491, 492 Seminar on Selected Geologic Topics. 1-3 F,S. Reports and discussion of 

geological topics of current interest with attention to methodology, bibliography and research 

techniques. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GY 500 Regional Geology of North America. Preq: GY 101 or 120, sr. standing. 1-6. Field 
study of classic geologic localities and geomorphic processes not indigenous to North 
Carolina. Typical areas are New England and adjacent Canada, northern Mexico and 
southwestern United States, and the Pacific Northwest. Representative subjects include the 
Canadian Shield, Precambrian mineral deposits, the San Andreas fault, desert 
geomorphology, Grand Canyon stratigraphy, modern and ancient reefs, and glaciated 
volcanoes. Mineral, rock, and fossil collecting. Student reports required. 
GY 521 Introduction to Subsurface Well Evaluation. Preq: CH 103, GY 120. 3(2-3) F, 
Alt. yrs. Principles, uses and interpretation of commonly used wireline technique for struc- 
tural, lithologic and fluid evaluation of wells. Oriented towards petroleum 
reserve/evaluations. 

GY 522 Petroleum Geology. Preq: GY 452. 3(3-0) S. Properties, origin, and modes of oc- 
curence of petroleum and natural gas. Geologic and economic features of the principal oil and 
gas fields, mainly in the United States. (Offered S 1978 and alt. years.) 
GY 524 Continental Evolution. Preq: GY 222, 351, 440, 452. 3(3-0) F. The stratigraphic 
and tectonic events which have shaped the continents, with emphasis upon North America; 
field trips. (Offered F 1978 and alt. years.) 

GY 532 Ore Microscopy. Preq: GY 331. 3(0-6) F. The theory and technique of microscopic 
investigation of opaque ore minerals, ores and mill products produced by benefication of ores. 
Studies of compositions and textures of materials in polished surfaces are based on observa- 
tions of optical and physical properties, etch reactions and microchemical tests. (Offered F 
1977 and alt. years.) 

GY 542 Microscopic Petrography. Preq: GY 440. 3(1-4) F. Systematic study by 
microscopic techniques of the constitution and origin of consolidated rocks. 



252 



GY 545 Advanced Igneous Petrology. Preq: GY 440. 3(2-2) S. Physico-chemical princi- 
ples related to igneous pedogenesis. General principles and specific problems including the 
origin, differentiation and emplacement of magmas and the possible relationships of igneous 
processes to global tectonics. (Offered S 1977 and alt. years.) 

GY 546 Advanced Metamorphic Petrology. Preq: GY 440. 3(3-3) S. The petrogenesis of 
metamorphic rocks including factors of metamorphism, metamorphic facies concept, 
metamorphic facies series, contact metamorphism, regional dynamothermal metamorphism, 
burial metamorphism. ACF-AKF diagrams and feldspars of metamorphic rocks. (Offered S 
1978 and alt. years.) 

GY 552 Exploratory Geophysics. Preq: GY 351, PY 208 or 212. 3(3-0) S. Fundamental 
principles underlying all geophysical methods; procedure and instruments involved in 
gravitational, magnetic, seismic, electrical and other methods of studying geological struc- 
tures and conditions. Spontaneous potential, resistivity, radioactivity, temperature, and 
other geophysical logging methods. Study of applications and interpretations of results. (Of- 
fered S 1977 and alt. years.) 

GY 563 Applied Sedimentary Analysis. Preq: GY 452, ST 361. 3(2-2) F. Extension of GY 
452, with emphasis on coarser grained detrital and chemical sedimentary rocks. Sampling of 
sedimentary population, critical study of assumptions underlying standard measurement 
techniques; treatment, testing and evaluation of sedimentary data; application to problems 
in sedimentology. (Offered F 1978 and alt. years.) 

GY 564 Sedimentary Environments of Deposition. Preq: GY 452 or grad. standing. 3(2- 
3) S. Fabric of large sedimentary basins in terms of the spatial distribution of component ma- 
jor rock facies; current litho-genetic models illustrating internal lithic relationships, 
variability, and predictability; evolution of litho-genetic units; comparison with recent 
equivalents; field trips. 

GY 565 Hydrogeology. Preq: GY 452. 3(3-0) S. Occurrence and sources of surface and sub- 
surface water. Relationships of surface water to subsurface water. Rock properties affecting 
infiltration, movement, lateral and vertical distribution, and quality of ground water. Deter- 
mination of permeability, capacity, specific yield, and other hydraulic characteristics of 
aquifiers. Principles of well design, legal aspects of water supplies. (Offered S 1977 and alt. 
years.) 

GY 567 Geochemistry. Preq: CH 331 or 433. 3(3-0) F. The quantitative distribution of ele- 
ments in the earth's crust, the hydrosphere and the atmosphere. Application of the laws of 
chemical equilibrium and resultant chemical reactions to natural earth systems. 
Geochemical application of Eh-pH diagrams. Geochemical cycles. Isotype geochemistry. 
(Offered F 1978 and alt. years.) 

GY 581 Geomorphology. Preq: GY 101 or 120 plus appropriate background. 3(2-3) F. Land 
forms and their relations to processes, stages of development, and adjustments to structure. 
Emphasis on mass-wasting, fluvial geomorphology of humid and arid climates, coasts, karst, 
and eolian processes. Lectures, map interpretations, and field trips. 

GY 582 Quaternary Geology. Preq: GY 101 or 120, sr. standing. 3(3-0) F. Glaciology, 
glacial geology. Pleistocene stratigraphy, periglacial geomorphology; Quaternary volcanism, 
tectonism, and sea-level fluctuations; late Cenozoic climate changes; field trips. (Offered S 
1977 and alt. years.) 

GY 583 Photogeology. Preq: GY 101 or 120. 3(2-2) S. The stereoscopic study of aerial 

photographs to obtain geologic information. The construction of bedrock and surficial 

geologic maps from aerial photographs. Aspects of remote sensing useful in geologic 

interpretation. 

GY (MAS) 584 Marine Geology. Preq: GY 452, or 101 or 120 plus appropriate 

background. 3(3-0) S. Morphology, structure and origin of ocean basins with their diverse 

features and their relations to the continents. Physical and chemical properties of the oceans, 

sedimentation in the marine environment and near-shore features. The economic potential of 

mineral resources derived from oceanic areas. (Offered S 1978 and alt. years.) 

GY 593 Advanced Topics in Geology. Preq: CI. 1-6 F,S. Special study of some advanced 

phases of geology. 



253 



History 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES: (200 level) Open to all students without prerequisite. 
Previous course work in any particular field of history is not necessary in order to take any in- 
troductory course. 

HI 204 Western Civilization to 1400. 3(3-0) F,S. A survey from earliest times to the end of 
the medieval era, treating the major civilizations which contributed to the development of 
Western Civilization. 

HI 205 Western Civilization Since 1400. 3(3-0) F,S. A survey of Western Civilization from 
the Renaissance to the present. 

HI 207 The Ancient World to 180, A.D. 3(3-0) F,S. The ancient cultures of the Middle 
East and Graeco-Roman civilization, including Egyptian, Minoan, Mycenean, Greek, and 
Roman societies and cultures. 

HI 208 The Middle Ages. 3(3-0) F,S. Medieval civilization as it emerged from the declin- 
ing Roman Empire through its apogee in the 13th century. The transition from the classical 
to the medieval world, the impact of the Germanic influx, and the political, economic, and 
social institutions of the High Middle Ages. 

HI 209 Renaissance to Waterloo 1300-1815. 3(3-0) F,S. A survey of all aspects of the 
period of transition from the medieval to the modern world. Includes the decline of medieval 
institutions, the Renaissance, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, rise of Absolutism, 
the English 17th-century revolution, the French Revolution and Napoleonic era. 

HI 210 Europe in the Nineteenth Century. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of the major political, 
economic and cultural developments in Europe from 1815 to World War I. 

HI 211 War, Revolution and Reconstruction: Europe Since 1914. 3(3-0) F,S. This course 
will stress the political, economic and social development of Europe from World War I to the 
present. Emphasis will be placed on the problems of creating stable political institutions un- 
der the impact of two world wars, left- and right-wing revolutions, the withdrawal from over- 
seas empires and technological and industrial growth. 

HI 215 Latin America to 1826. 3(3-0) F,S. The origins and development of social, 
political, economic and religious institutions from pre-conquest times to the achievement of 
independence. The ancient American cultures; Spain and Portugal before 1492; the conquest 
and settlement; Spanish rule in theory and practice; economic life; the Church; land and 
labor; the African contribution; the Portugese in Brazil; the independence movements. 

HI 216 Latin America Since 1826. 3(3-0) F,S. Social, political, economic and intellectual 
life in the 19th and 20th centuries. Major attention to Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Peru and 
Cuba. Topics include the social structure of the new nations; 19th century liberalism; the 
force of tradition; relations with Europe and the United States; the Monroe Doctrine and 
U.S. intervention; economic change; caudillo rule; 20th century upheavals; the Mexican 
Revolution; Peron's Argentina; Castro and Latin America. 

HI 233 The World in the 20th Century. 3(3-0) F,S. National and international problems 
in the Western and non-Western World, including institutions and ideas at the turn of the 
century, origins and effects of the First World War, the post-war challenge to Western 
democratic supremacy from within and without, the Second World War, and problems of the 
post-war period. 

HI 241 United States to 1783. 3(3-0) F,S. The European background of American history; 
establishment of English colonies in America; colonial historical development; the conflict 
with England, the securing of independence and the establishment of independent 
government. 

HI 242 United States 1783-1845. 3(3-0) F,S. Inauguration of the new nation; territorial ex- 
pansion and the westward movement; growth of democracy and social reform; development 
of national feeling and sectional tensions. 

HI 243 United States 1845-1914. 3(3-0) F,S. The coming of the Civil War; the war and the 
reconstruction; the rise of industrialism and the Populist and Progressive response; the 
emergence of the United States as a world power. 
HI 244 United States, Since 1914. 3(3-0) F,S. The United States and the First World 

254 



War; the society in the 1920's; the Great Depression and the New Deal; the Second World 
War and post-war international problems; the Truman and Eisenhower years; America in 
the 1960's and 1970's. 

HI 263 Traditional East Asia: Prehistory to 1800. 3(3-0) Introduction to the civilizations 
of China, Japan and Korea prior to the penetration of Western institutions and ideas. 

HI 264 Modern East Asia: 1800 to Present. 3(3-0) The western impact and the responses 
in China, Japan and the smaller nations of East and Southeast Asia. 
HI 265 Introduction to South Asian Civilizations. 3(3-0) A general introduction to the 
traditional civilizations of South Asia using a broad cultural approach. Concentration is on 
religious and social institutions and values. 

HI 266 Modern South Asia 1700 to Present. 3(3-0) Deals with the history of South Asia 
from the British conquest to the present. Emphasis is on the rise of nationalism and changes 
in society in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh since independence. 

HI 272 The Afro-American in America. 3(3-0) A brief consideration of his African 
background, and the particular role, experience and influence of the Afro-American at 
various stages in the development of the United States. 

HI 281 Introduction to the History of Science and Technology. 3(3-0) An Introduction 
to the study of the history of science and the history of technology; consideration of the basic 
methods and types of data used by historians in each field; examination of problems and 
schools of historical interpretation through selected case studies. 

HI 298 Special Projects in History. 1-3 F,S. Utilized for guided research or experimental 
classes at the soph, level. Staff 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NOTE: Prerequisite for 300 and 400 level courses: Three hours of history. 

HI 321 Ancient and Medieval Science. 3(3-0) F. Selected topics to examine how pre- 
modern "science" differed from the science that emerged after the "Scientific Revolution" of 
the 17th century. The relations of science to social and economic factors, technology, magic, 
and religion. Examples from pre-history, Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, India, Greece, Rome, 
Islam and the Medieval and Renaissance West. Sylla 

HI 322 Rise of Modern Science. 3(3-0) F,S. The "Scientific Revolution" of the 16th and 
17th centuries. Analysis of Newton's System. The origins of modern chemistry, geology and 
evolution theory. The radical revision of Newtonian theory in the 20th century. These 
developments are considered within the context of the great historical movements of their 
time. Mulholland, Sylla 

HI 341 Technology in History. (3-0) S. The role of technology in society from earliest 
times to the present. The achievements of technology and their impact on society as a whole 
are examined along with the social status, education, sources of support, and relationships to 
church and government of scientists and engineers in various periods. Mulholland 

HI 351 English History (to 1688). 3(3-0) The evolution of the English constitution and the 
political, social and economic background of English cultural development. 

Carlton, Downs 

HI 352 English History (since 1688). 3(3-0) The evolution of the English constitution and 
the political, social, and economic background of English cultural development. 

Carlton, Downs 

HI (EB) 370 The Rise of Industrialism. 3(3-0) F. (See economics and business, page 

216.) 

HI (EB) 371 Evolution of the American Economy. 3(3-0) F. (See economics and 

business, page 216.) 

HI 400 Civilization of the Ancient Near East. 3(3-0) The civilization of Mesopotamia 

and Egypt from earliest times to the fall of Babylon in 539 B.C. Sack 

HI 403 Ancient Greek Civilization. 3(3-0) The history of the Hellenes from the Minoan 

civilization through Alexander's legacy, with readings in Herodotus and Thucydides.Sack 

HI 404 Rome to 180 A.D. 3(3-0) Roman development from the Estruscans through Em- 

255 



porer Marcus Aurelius (180 A.D.). Examines through readings in Livy and Tacitus the great 
political achivement which saw Rome rise from a cattletown on the Tiber to the head of an 
Empire. Riddle 

HI 406 From Roman Empire to Middle Ages. 3(3-0) Using primarily translated Latin 
sources the course deals with the decline of Imperial Rome, and its succession by new Chris- 
tian, Germanic, and Islamic civilizations. Riddle, Newby 

HI 410 Italian Renaissance. 3(3-0) Renaissance humanism, an educational ideal and an 
awareness of man as the sole creator in the historical world, will be examined in its 
relationship to the Italian republics and princedoms of the 14th through the 16th 
century. Banker 

HI 41 1 The Protestant and Catholic Reformation of the Sixteenth Century. 3(3-0) The 
conditions and criticisms which led to reform and the nature of the institutional and 
theological changes affected by the various churches and sects. Special attention to Luther 
and Calvin. Banker 

HI 414 The Age of Absolutism. 3(3-0) Concentrates on the development of royal ab- 
solutism in 17th century Europe, the nature of the institutions which supported it, the par- 
ticular cultural forms and patterns which it generated, and the reasons for its decline in the 
18th century. Greenlaw 

HI 415 Revolutionary Europe. 3(3-0) A broadly based analysis of Europe's first 
revolutionary era. The revolution in thought called the Enlightenment, the causes and 
character of the Revolution in France, the impact of these events in France and Europe. 

Greenlaw 

HI 416 The Social Transformation of Europe, 1750-1850. 3(3-0) An historical examina- 
tion of social traditions and change in Europe (esp. England, France and Germany) from the 
mid-eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth century, including both rural and urban life. The 
course emphasizes population growth and its effects, changes in lower and middle class 
family life, the evolution of labor, the experience and perception of poverty, types of popular 
protest. LaVopa 

HI 418 Fascism in Germany and Italy, 1919-1945. 3(3-0) Hitler and Mussolini: Two 
aspects of European Fascism in the interwar period. Suval 

HI 425 Tudor and Stuart England. 3(3-0) The permanent political crisis set into motion 
by the Reformation culminating in the English Civil War. Emphasis on certain key develop- 
ments in social, political and economic life such as the development of a new concept of 
kingship, the growing independence of Parliament, the search for religious uniformity and 
the changing status of the aristocracy and gentry. Carlton 

HI 428 England in the Age of the American Revolution. 3(3-0) English political, 
economic, social and imperial ideas and institutions between 1763 and 1783 with emphasis on 
how these affected and were affected by the War of the American Revolution. Downs 

HI 429 Twentieth Century Britain. 3(3-0) British political, social and economic history 
since 1914, with reference to the effects of two world wars, the growth of the welfare state, 
British decline as a power, and the search for a new role in the world. Carlton 

HI 430 Modern France. 3(3-0) The major trends since the downfall of Napoleon I with a 
short preliminary survey of the old regime and the revolutionary period 1789-1815. Cultural, 
economic, social and intellectual trends are stressed as well as the political. The ways in 
which France has been a seedbed for new movements in Europe. Brown 

HI 432 Germany Since 1848. 3(3-0) German history from the revolutions of 1848 to the 
present, concentrating on problems of nationalism and political and social reform. Suval 

HI 436 European Thought and Society, 1750-1900. 3(3-0) A study of major figures in 
European thought and letters since the Enlightenment and their influence on European and 
world culture, society and politics. Staff 

HI 438 History of Russia to 1881. 3(3-0) F. The social, political, economic and cultural 
history of Kiev Rus., Muscovy and Imperial Russia through the emancipation of the serfs and 
the fundamental reforms that followed. Emphasis on internal developments; some attention 
to foreign policy. Wheeler 

HI 439 History of Russia Since 1881. 3(3-0) S. The history of Russia and the Soviet Union 
256 



from the great reforms of the 19th century to modern times, emphasizing political, religious, 
and cultural trends that underlie the development of the Russian state and society and the 
position of the U.S.S.R. in the world today. (Some attention to foreign policy with emphasis 
on Soviet period.) Wheeler 

HI 441 The United States: The Colonial Period. 3(3-0) An intensive analysis of the 
English Colonization of the New World, the motives for settlement, the growth of political in- 
stitutions, the development of imperial-colonial relations, the rise of slavery, the role of 
religion and ideas in colonial life, and the process of Americanization from 1606 to 
1763. Constantin 

HI 442 The United States: Revolution to Constitution. 3(3-0) The conflict with Great 
Britain after 1763 leading to the declaring of independence; the war for American indepen- 
dence in its military and diplomatic aspects; the domestic problems; the foreign relations in 
the post-war years; the establishment of government in the new nation. 

Constantin, Elliott 

HI 443 The Age of Jefferson. 3(3-0) The political, social, economic, intellectual and 
diplomatic aspects of United States history from the adoption of the Constitution in 1789 
through the second Madison administration. Establishment of the federal government; im- 
plementation of Hamilton's financial system; foreign affairs during the Wars of the French 
Revolution; rise of political parties; triumph of the Jeffersonian Republicans; territorial ex- 
pansion of the United States; War of 1812. Wishy 

HI 444 The Age of Jackson, 1815-1850. 3(3-0) Political, social, cultural and economic 
developments from the Era of Good Feelings to the Compromise of 1850. Readings organized 
around four major interpretations of the period. King 

HI 445 American Social Ideals and Institutions Before the Civil War. 3(3-0) F. In- 
vestigation in selected periods before the Civil War of the structure and role of the American 
family, organization of voluntary societies (such as reform groups) of professions and occupa- 
tions and the development of social ideals and attitudes in both workaday and highbrow 
culture. Readings include diaries, letters and advice manuals. Scott 

HI 446 Civil War and Reconstruction. 3(3-0) S. The period of sectional strife and war. 
Examination of the impact of the war on the United States and the efforts to reconstruct the 
South on a national basis. . Harris 

HI 447 American Social Ideals and Institutions Since the Civil War. 3(3-0) S. Study of 
American social and cultural life since the Civil War and focusing on changes in the nature of 
social ties, in the institutions surrounding work, in sex roles and the function of the family, 
and in agencies of education and communication. Scott 

HI 448 Populism and Progressivism. 3(3-0) The two most important general reform 
movements in the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the "agrarian 
crusade" and the Progressive movement, are examined in the context of the economics, 
politics, society, and ethics of their time. O'Brien 

HI 450 The United States in Prosperity and Depression, 1919-1939. 3(3-0) F. The 
domestic history of the United States between the World Wars, emphasizing the social and 
political responses to economic, demographic, and organizational change. Collins 

HI 452 Recent America. 3(3-0) Some of the major problems in American life since 1939. 

Hobbs 

HI 454 U.S. Foreign Relations. 3(3-0) F. The origins of American foreign policy and the 
conduct of diplomacy in the era since the United States became a world power. Stresses com- 
plex array of personalities, ideas, institutions and forces involved in shaping and im- 
plementing policy. Beers 
HI 455 Christianity and Its Critics in American History- 3(3-0) Analysis of major 
challenges to conventional or established belief and orthodoxy from Anne Hutchinson and 
Roger Williams to the age of Darwin. Concentration on the major intellectual debates about 
the foundations of traditional faith as well as on alterantives to Christianity and attempts to 
restate its claims. Constantin 
HI 458 Significant Figures in 20th Century America. 3(3-0) The impact on American 
life in the 20th century of important people in fields of politics, war and peace, sports and 
various forms of communication. Hobbs 

257 



HI 461 Civilization of the Old South. 3(3-0) The distinctive features of the Old South as 
part of the regional development of United States history. Consideration of colonial factors in 
the making of the South, development of the plantation system and Negro slavery, Southern 
social order, intellectual and cultural life, economic development, and rise of Southern 
nationalism. Elliott, Crisp 

HI 463 North Carolina to 1860. 3(3-0) F. North Carolina history from the earliest explora- 
tions through the 1850's. Elliott 
HI 464 North Carolina Since 1860. 3(3-0) S. North Carolina history from the eve of the 
Civil War to the present. O'Brien 

HI 465 The American West. 3(3-0) A history of the American frontier with emphasis on 
the trans-Mississippi West. The course surveys the cycles of exploration, conquest, and set- 
tlement of this region, giving special attention to the contracts and conflicts among the 
native American Indians and the various European cultures which penetrated the continent. 
This survey is supplemented by an examination of the Turner thesis and other theories of 
Western and frontier influence on the development of the United States. Crisp 

HI 467 Modern Mexico. 3(3-0) F. Major developments in Mexican national life since 1821. 
The 19th century: the era of Santa Anna, the war with the United States, the Reform, the 
French intervention, and the dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz. The 1910 Revolution and the 
resulting transformation of Mexico's political, social and economic institutions. Reading 
knowledge of Spanish helpful, but not required. Beezley 

HI 469 20th Century Latin American Revolutions. 3(3-0) The variety of revolutionary 
changes in certain 20th century Latin American republics. Concentrates on Argentina, 
Bolivia, Peru and Cuba, but includes some other nations. Examines movements dedicated to 
the overthrow of traditional liberal institutions and their replacement by other political, 
social and economic systems. Beezley 

HI 471 Revolutionary China. 3(3-0) The failure of traditional Chinese society to find 
means of accommodation with the West. The emergence of the revolutionary Communist 
state and society. Staff 

HI 472 Modern Japan, 1850 to Present. 3(3-0) Japan's emergence as a nation and world 



power. 



Staff 



HI 473 20th Century Asian Revolutionaries. 3(3-0) Use of psycho-historical techniques 
fcr the comparative study of the lives and works of great figures in 20th century Asia: Sun 
YaSsen, Mao Tse-tung, Mohandas Gandhi and Jawarharlal Nehru. Staff 

HI 477 British Empire and Commonwealth. 3(3-0) The evolution of colonial self- 
government and the transformation of imperial relationships in the former British dependen- 
cies in Canada, the West Indies, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Downs 

HI 491 Seminar in History. 3(3-0) F,S. Open to srs. in history, other srs. and grad. stu- 
dents with departmental permission. Staff 

HI 492 Seminar in History. 3(3-0) F,S. Open to srs. in history, other srs. and grad. stu- 
dents with departmental permission. Staff 

HI 498 Special Topics in History. 1-6 F,S. Extensive readings on predetermined topics 
focused around a central theme. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NOTE: Prerequisite for all history courses at the 500 and 600 level is six hours of advanced 
history or equivalent. 

HI 515 High Middle Ages. 3(3-0) An analysis of medieval culture. Topics such as the 
revival of the Roman Empire, monastic and papal reform, the rise of universities, the evolu- 
tion of representative bodies, the Gothic style, troubadour and goliardic poetry, 
scholasticism, and the revival of Roman law. Riddle 

HI 530 Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon. 3(3-0) Aspects of the French 
Revolution and the Napoleonic era which are currently subject to differing interpretations. 

Greenlaw 



258 



HI 532 History of Great Britain, 1820-1914. 3(3-0) Great Britain from the Regency of 
George IV to the outbreak of World War I with emphasis on the most significant develop- 
ments in constitutional, religious, and economics ideas and institutions. Downs 
HI 536 History of International Relations Since 1870. 3(3-0) European diplomatic 
history and world international relations from the Franco-Prussian War through both World 
Wars up to the present. Emphasis on policies and attempts to solve international 
problems. Brown 

HI 545 The American Civil War. 3(3-0) F. Events that led to the disruption of the union 
and intensive study of the war, emphasizing non-military aspects. Only the major military 
campaigns are discussed. Harris 

HI 546 Reconstruction of the American Union. 3(3-0) S. The difficulties involved in the 
restoration and readjustment of American society after the Civil War. Attention to social and 
economic conditions in the defeated South, military reconstruction and Republican ascend- 
ancy in the region. Harris 

HI 548 The American Response to Industrialism. 3(3-0) The industrialization of the 
American economy and efforts to deal with the ensuing transformation of American life 
through politics, social institutions and ideals. O'Brien 

HI 551 History and Principles of the Administration of Archives and Manuscripts. 

3(3-0) F. The nature, importance and use of original manuscript resources; the history and 
evolution of written records, and the institutions administering them. Mitchell 

HI 552 Application of Principles of Administration of Archives and Manuscripts. 

Preq: HI 551. 3(3-0) S. Internship training applies principles and practices of archival 
management. Mitchell 

HI 561 U.S. Far Eastern Relations. 3(3-0) S. American expansion into the Pacific and in- 
volvement in Asian affairs. Both official diplomatic relations and unofficial contacts (by mis- 
sionaries, educators, businessmen, and the like) which influenced Americans. Beers 

HI 565 The History of Urban Life in the U.S., 1607-1865. 3(3-0) F. Designed to give the 
student an understanding of the historical background of today's urban problems. 

King 

HI 566 The History of Urban Life in the U.S., 1865-Present. 3(3-0) S. Designed to give 
the student an understanding of the historical background of today's urban problems. King 

HI 572 History of Soviet Russia Since 1930. 3(3-0) An analysis of the domestic and 
foreign policies of the Soviet Union since 1930 with emphasis on the position of the Soviet 
Union in the world since 1945. Wheeler 

HI 598 Special Topics in History. 1-6 F,S. Topics of interest to advanced students under 
faculty direction on a tutorial basis. Staff 

Horticultural Science 

HS 101 Plants for Home and Pleasure. 3(2-3) F,S. A general course concerned with the 
basic uses of plants and flowers in and around the home. Topics studied will be indoor plants, 
flower arranging, home landscaping, and flower, vegetable and fruit gardening. Kimmins 

HS 201 Principles of Horticulture. 3(3-0) F,S. Basic principles of production, processing 
and utilization of fruit, vegetable, flower, and ornamental crops. The economic importance 
and distribution of horticultural enterprises. The roles of horticulture in world nutrition and 
food supply, improvement of environmental quality in the landscape, aesthetic values, and 
medicinal uses. Cochran 

HS 211, 212 Ornamental Plants. Preq: BS 100. 3(1-5) F(211), S(212). Identification, dis- 
tribution, growth characteristics, adaptation, and usage of ornamental trees, shrubs, vines, 
and herbaceous plants in the landscape. Southall 

HS 301 Plant Propagation. Preq: BS 100, or BO 200. 3(2-2) F,S. The principles, methods, 
and practices in seedage, cuttage, division, budding, grafting, and other methods of propaga- 
tion. Influence of hereditary, environmental, and pathological variations on the plant pro- 
ducts. Staff 

259 



HS 342 Landscape Horticulture. 3(2-3) F,S. Application of design principles to landscap- 
ing small properties and selecting and planting trees, shrubs, flowers, and lawn grasses. Stu- 
dents will work out detailed landscape plans. Field trips to homes and gardens. Staff 
HS 411 Nursery Management. Preq: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F,S. Principles and prac- 
tices of production, management, and marketing of field-grown and container-grown nursery 
plants. Field trips. . Raulston 

HS 414 Residential Landscaping. Preq: HS 211, 212, SSC 200. 4(2-6) F,S. Landscape 
planning and development of residential properties to create an aesthetic and functional 
composition to complement the home. Required completion of planting plans including 
design, plant lists, planting details, and technical specifications. Staff 

HS 421 Tree Fruit Production. Preq: BS 100 or BO 200, SSC 200, HS 201. 3(2-3) F. 
Identification, adaptation, production and marketing methods of the principal tree fruit and 
nut crops of the United States. Fundamental principles underlying perennial plant culture 
will be applied to the production of specific fruit crops with emphasis on the crops of com- 
mercial importance in North Carolina. Ballington 
HS 432 Vegetable Production. Preq: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. The origin, importance, 
distribution, botanical relationships, and principles of production and marketing of the ma- 
jor vegetable crops. Commercial production stressed. (Offered F 1976 and alt. years.) Miller 
HS 441 Floriculture I. Preq: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. Greenhouse site selection and 
construction. The influence and control of environmental factors affecting growth and flower- 
ing of floricultural crops. Larson 
HS 442 Floriculture II. Preq: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) S. Cultural requirements and 
marketing procedures for floricultural crops. Acquaintance with these crops through 
classroom and laboratory experiences. Larson 
HS 471 Arboriculture. Preq: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) S. Principles and practices for care 
and maintenance of ornamental trees and shrubs. Transplanting, fertilization, control of in- 
sects and diseases, bracing and cabling, and control of tree growth by chemical or pruning 
techniques. Staff 
HS 491 Senior Seminar in Horticultural Science. Preq: Consent of department. 1(1-0) 
F. Presentation of scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems in 
horticulture and related fields. Department Head 
HS 495 Special Topics in Horticultural Science. 1-6 F,S. Study in one or more of the 
following: an intensive literature review, experimental investigation with instructor 
guidance, or new course development on a trial basis. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

HS (CS) 514 Principles and Methods in Weed Science. Preq: CS 414 or equivalent. 3(2- 
2) S. Losses caused by weeds, the ecology of weeds, biological control, basic concepts of weed 
management, herbicide-crop relationships and herbicide development. Introduction to 
greenhouse and bioassay techniques used in herbicide work and to field research techniques 
supplemented by laboratory and field exercises. Monaco 

HS (FS) 521 Food Preservation. 3(2-3) F. (See food science, page 240.) 
HS 531 Physiology of Landscape Plants. Preqs: BO 421 or CI. 3(2-3) F. Designed to cover 
relationships of plants to landscape environments. Study of plant function, basic climatology 
and plant physiological principles involved in the selection, utilization and maintenance of 
physical landscape environments in exterior and interior landscape plantings. Raulston 
HS (CS, GN) 541 Plant Breeding Methods. 3(3-0) F. (See crop science, page 210.) 
HS (CS, GN) 542 Plant Breeding Field Procedures. 2(0-4) Sum. (See crop science, page 
210.) 

HS 552 Growth of Horticultural Plants. Preq: BO 421. 3(2-3) F. Exercises in tissue 
culture principles and techniques as they relate to horticulture. Emphasis on endogenous 
controls of plant growth and the role of growth regulating compounds in horticultural 
research and production. Graduate Staff 

HS (FS) 562 Post-Harvest Physiology. Preq: BO 421. 3(3-0) S. Chemical and 
physiological changes that occur during handling, transportation, and storage which affect 

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the quality of horticultural crops. Preharvest and postharvest conditions which influence 
these changes. Graduate Staff 

HS 599 Research Principles. Preq: CI. 1-6 F,S. Investigation of a horticultural problem 
under faculty direction. Practice in experimental techniques and procedures, critical review 
of literature and scientific writing. The problem may last one or two semesters with credits 
determined by the nature of the problem. A written report and final oral exam are 
required. Graduate Staff 

Industrial Arts 

IA 111 Introduction to Industrial Arts. 1(1-0) F,S. A basic course designed to orient the 
student to the philosophy, objectives, and scope of industrial arts as related to teacher educa- 
tion and industrial employment. A study of the problems and opportunities in the 
profession. Staff 

IA 1 13 Technical Drawing I. Credit will not be allowed for students who have credit in E 
101. 3(1-4) F,S. This course covers theory and practice in the area of technical communica- 
tion through the sketching and drafting media. The student will get practice in both 
sketching and instrument drawing in orthographic projection, pictorial drawing, sections, 
revolutions and sheet metal development. Troxler 

IA 1 15 Wood Processing I. 3( 1-4) F,S,Sum. An introductory course in the design and con- 
struction of wood products. The uses of basic hand tools, basic woodworking machines, 
fasteners and finishes, and the nature of wood as a construction material are included. 

Leeper 

IA 122 Metal Technology I. 3(1-4) F,S,Sum. An introductory course in the basic design 
and construction of metal products. Sheet metals, bench metals, foundry, welding, turning, 
drilling, and cutting are included. Emphasis is upon the nature of the materials with respect 
to design and machining practices. Baker 

IA 231 Industrial Arts Design. Preq: E 101 or IA 113; IA 115 and 112. 3(1-4) F,S. Princi- 
ples of design, functional and aesthetic, as applicable to the creation of products in 
materials. Emphasis is on individual student experiences and expression. Troxler 

IA 233 Metal Technology II. Preq: IA 122. 3(1-4) F,S. This course derives its content from 
the concepts of machining metals based on the five basic chip-removal metalworking arts of 
planing, turning, drilling, milling, and grinding. Baker 

IA 246 Graphics Technology. Preq: High school technical drawing course. 3(1-4) 
F.S.Sum. An introductory course providing basic experiences in letterpress, offset printing, 
silk screen printing, photography, binding, and finishing. Leeper 

IA 351 General Ceramics. 3(1-4) F,S,Sum. This course is designed to give the student an 
opportunity to work with ceramic materials as a medium of expression and to get experience 
in the basic manufacturing processes of the ceramic industry. Emphasis will be given to a 
study of the sources of clay, designing, forming, decorating, and firing of ceramic products. 

Troxler 

IA 359 Electrical Technology I. Preq: MA 111, PY 212 or 221. 3(1-4) F,S,Sum. A beginn- 
ing course in electricity-electronics with special emphasis upon understanding the basic con- 
cepts of the phenomena of electricity-electronics, technical vocabulary and symbols; the use 
of formulas in reasoning and computation; securing, organizing, and treatment of data; and 
the methodology of logical problem solving are stressed. Young 

IA 360 Electrical Technology II. Preq: IA 359. 3(2-2) F.S. Continuation of electricity- 
electronics with special emphasis upon the application of electrical principles in consumer 
and industrial products. Each student is required to design, develop, and construct at least 
one product as a part of the laboratory experience. Fault analysis will be stressed. Young 

IA 364 Wood Processing II. Preq: IA 115. 3(1-4) F.S. Advanced study of woods technology 
with emphasis on machine processes, materials, and techniques of furniture production. Stu- 
dent work will be concerned with problem-solving activities in design, construction and fur- 
niture finishing. Leeper 
I A 368 Technical Drawing II. Preq: E 101 or IA 113. 3(1-4) F.S. The second course in a 

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two-course sequence to provide the industrial arts education student with the additional con- 
tent and skill necessary to teach drawing courses with confidence and flexibility at the mid- 
dle school or senior high school level. Troxler 

IA 476 Power Technology. Preq: MA 111, PY 221. 3(1-4) F,S. Power technology is concer- 
ned with the development of an understanding of the principles of the creation, transfer and 
utilization of power. Special emphases are given to both physical concepts and application. 
Included are: electrical generators and motors, electrical controls, internal combustion 
engines, hydraulic systems and pneumatic systems. General analysis of faults and their 
corrections is included. Staff 

IA 480 Modern Industries. Preq: Junior standing. 3(3-0) S. An overview of the function 
and organization of modern industry. Principles of work simplification, motion economy, 
processing and scheduling are reviewed. The effects of technological change on labor, 
management, and the consumer are considered. Attention is focused on contributions of 
technology to specific industrial processes in machining, forming and fabricating. Young 

IA 490 Special Problems in Industrial Arts. Preq: Junior standing; CI. 6 max. F,S,Sum. 
This course enables the student to obtain additional competence in particular areas of in- 
dustrial arts. The student is assigned an advisor who has special knowledge and skill in the 
area. The student is expected to define his special interest and to outline the procedures he 
will follow in meeting it. The advisor approves or asks for modification of the proposal, makes 
arrangements for laboratory time, and holds regular conferences with the student for pur- 
poses of counsel, demonstration and evaluation. Staff 

IA 510 Design for Industrial Arts Teachers. Preq: Six hours drawing, IA 205 or 
equivalent. 3(2-2) Sum. New developments in design emphasizing the relationship of 
material and form in the selection and designing of industrial arts projects. Staff 

IA (ED) 560 New Developments in Industrial Arts Education. Preq: 12 hours ED, 
teaching experience. 3(3-0) F,S. Assists teachers and administrators in developing new con- 
cepts and new content based on the changes in technology. They will be required to 
reevaluate their programs considering new concepts and content. Staff 

IA 590 Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts. Preq: Sr. standing, CI. Maximum 6. 
Based on individual problems and designed for advanced majors in industrial arts education. 
An opportunity to broaden or intensify knowledge and abilities through investigation and 
research in metals, plastics or ceramics. Staff 

IA 592 Special Problems in Industrial Arts. Preq: One term of student teaching or 
equivalent. Maximum 6. Purpose is to broaden the subject matter experiences in industrial 
arts. Problems involving experimentation, investigation and research in one or more in- 
dustrial arts areas will be required. Staff 
IA (ED) 595 Industrial Arts Workshop. Preq: One or more years of teaching experience. 
3(3-0) Sum. For experienced teachers, administrators and supervisors of industrial arts to 
develop sound principles and practices for initiating, conducting, and evaluating programs. 
Enrollees will pool their knowledge and practical experiences and will do intensive research 
work on individual and group programs. Staff 

Industrial Engineering 

IE 200 Introduction to Industrial Engineering. 2(1-3) F. Introduction to industrial and 
management engineering practice and concepts, including activity planning and control, 
human performance, resource allocation, operations improvement, and management 
systems. Illustrations of such functions in manufacturing, commercial, government or service 
organizations. Site visits, discussions and problems which relate to the design and operation 
of integrated systems of humans, machines, information and materials. Problem analysis, 
logic and application of the computer. Staff 

IE 241 Furniture Manufacturing Processes I. Preq: E 240. 3(3-0) S. Survey of furniture 
manufacturing technology, emphasizing equipment and its relationship to furniture product 
engineering. Clark 

IE 301 Engineering Economy. Preq: MA 111. This course not open to students scheduling 
IE 311. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. Criteria and techniques for management and engineering decisions 

262 



in relation to economy of design, selection and operation. Effects of depreciation policies and 
machine replacement consideration. Problem solving and development of detailed project 
economy studies. Canada, Myers 

IE 308 Control of Production and Service Systems. Preq: IE 321, ST 372; Coreq: IE 352. 
4(3-1) S. An intensive study of the strategy for planning and control of production and service 
system. Taught from a total systems viewpoint, drawing on student's prior experience in 
statistics, information processing, and cost accounting. Topics include production organiza- 
tion, flow and inventory accumulation. Quality control as well as quantity control is stressed. 
Emphasis on applications. Blair, Llewellyn 

IE 311 Engineering Economic Analysis. Preq: Soph, standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Engineering 
and managerial decision making. The theory of interest and its uses. Equivalent annual 
costs, present worths, internal rates of return, and benefit/cost ratios. Accounting deprecia- 
tion and its tax effects. Economic lot size and similar cost minimization models. Sensitivity 
analysis. Cost dichotomies: fixed vs. variable, and incremental vs. sunk; use of accounting 
data. Replacement theory and economic life. Engineering examples. Bernard, Canada 

IE 321 Business Data Processing. Preq: Course in computer programming. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Introduction to data processing principles and functions. Analysis and representation of data 
flow, logic, and procedures. Development of computer-based business applications; process- 
ing modes and controls; administrative methods and procedures. Llewellyn 

IE 328 Manufacturing Processes. Preq: MAT 201. 3(2-3) F,S. Manufacturing operations 
for mechanical component parts and assembled products emphasizing: 1) capabilities and 
limitations of the various processes; 2) the concept of manufacturability, i.e. the interaction 
between product design, material, process, machine, man, and cost. These points illustrated 
experimentally. Harder 

IE 332 Motion and Time Study. Preq: ST 361. 4(3-3) F,S. Principles and methodology of 
operation process charting; methods and analysis; motion and micromotion study; and man- 
machine relationships. Use of predetermined time data; time study procedures, including 
performance rating, determination of allowances based on workplace, and environmental 
factors; and applications of wage incentives. Blair 

IE (PSY) 338 Human Factors in Equipment Design. Preq: PSY 337 or IE 332. 3(2-2) F. 
Methodology including equipment design, biomechanics, and accident study. Man's sensory, 
motor, and decision-making abilities are related to problems of systems design, operator ef- 
ficiency, and safety as these involve displays, controls, work-place layout, and environmental 
stressors. Pearson 

IE 340 Furniture Manufacturing Processes II. Preq: IE 241 and WPS 205. 4(2-6) F. Sur- 
vey of technology, emphasizing sequence of operations, production rate and the integration of 
many types of equipment into a manufacturing system. Prak 

IE 341 Furniture Plant Layout and Design.Preq: IE 340. 3(1-6) S. Problems in furniture 
manufacturing plant design; building structures, equipment location, space utilization, 
layout for operation and control, allied topics in power utilization light, heat, ventilation and 
safety. Myers 

IE 343 Plant Layout and Materials Handling. Preq: IE 328, 332. 3(1-4) F,S. Location 
and design of a production facility, considering factors affecting production and impact on 
environment and community. A major design project based on an operational situation. In- 
cludes market analysis; plant location, manufacturing process layout, and economic 
analysis. Alvarez 

IE 345 Principles of Upholstery- Preq: IE 241. 2(2-0) F,S. An examination of product 
function, frame design principles, upholstery constructions, material properties, and 
manufacturing processes. A study of the unique problems of upholstery merchandising, order 
processing, labor utilization, inventory control and costing. Clark 

IE 346 Furniture Design and Construction. Preq: IE 340. 2(2-0) S. Selected topics. 
Emphasis is on panel construction, panel manufacturing and finishing methods and the ap- 
plication in knock down furniture construction (Offered in alt. years.) Prak 
IE 351 Manufacturing Engineering. Preq: MAT 201. 3(2-3) F. Operations employed in 
the manufacture of mechanical component parts and assembled products with emphasis on: 
1) capabilities and limitations of the various processes in practice; 2) the concept of manufac- 

263 



turability, i.e. the interaction between product design, material, process, machine, man and 
cost; and 3) the theories associated with these processes. Laboratory periods illustrate and 
verify points. Harder 

IE 352 Work Analysis and Design. Preq: Course in mathematical statistics. 3(1-4) S. 
Work methods and production processes to improve operator effectiveness and reduce 
production costs. Techniques studies include those successfully applied in industry such as 
operation analysis, notion study, value engineering, predetermined time systems, time study 
and line balancing. The engineering approach to man-machine relationships, methods im- 
provement, standardizing work procedures, and accurate measurement of labor content. 
Data obtained provide the basis for managerial controls. Blair 

IE 355 Introduction to Occupational Safety & Health. Preq: Soph, standing. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Provides a basic understanding of safety and health practices of contemporary concern to the 
plant manager, safety engineer, etc. Emphasizes the applications of human factors, 
biomechanics, work physiology, toxicology, statistics, and engineering in accident prevention 
and control. Specific instruments used in the measurements of safety and health 
problems. Ayoub 

IE 361 Deterministic Models in Industrial Engineering. Preq: MA 202. 3(3-0) F. In- 
troduction to mathematical modeling, analysis techniques, and solution procedures ap- 
plicable to decision-making problems in a deterministic environment. Methodologies 
covered are classical optimization, linear, and dynamic programming. Applications relate to 
problems in inventory control, production planning and scheduling, project planning, 
resource allocation, transportation, and personnel assignment. Magazine, Nuttle 

IE 371 Furniture Quality and Production Control. Preq: IE 321, 340; ST 361. 4(3-3) S. 
An introduction to statistical techniques applied to industrial problems. Control chart 
techniques, sampling plans, design of quality standards. Forecasting, inventory control, 
production planning and scheduling. Organization of quality control and production control. 
Examples from the furniture industry will be used throughout. Prak 

IE 401 Stochastic Models in Industrial Engineering. Preq: An introductory course in 
probability and/or math statistics. 3(3-0) F,S. Introduction to mathematical modeling, 
analysis, and solution procedures applicable to decision-making problems in an uncertain 
(stochastic) environment. Methodologies covered include dynamic programming, simula- 
tion. Markov chains, and classical optimization. Applications relate to problems such as in- 
ventory control, waiting lines, and system reliability and maintainability. Stidham 

IE 402 Quantitative Methods and Optimization. Preq: IE 361. 3(3-0) F. Treatment of 
decision-making problem structures and quantitative methods beyond those covered in IE 
361. Topics covered include linear programming, non-linear programming, integer program- 
ming, implicit enumeration, game theory, flow networks, and activity networks, presented 
from a problem-solving orientation. Nuttle, Stidham 

IE 403 Quantitative Methods Practicum. Preq: IE 361, 401. 3(1-2) S. Application of 
quantitative methods in industrial engineering to problems originating via case studies, site 
visits, and/or visits from practitioners. Emphasis on modeling or realistic decision-making 
problems with every attempt made to analyze and solve problems using quanititative techni- 
ques. When applicable, computer codes used as aid to solution. Communication of results of 
studies an integral part of the course. Stidham, Nuttle 

IE 420 Manufacturing Controls. Preq: IE 301. 3(3-0) F,S. Theory and methodology for 
developing and maintaining profitable manufacturing operations. Development of principles 
and procedures for control of materials, manpower and costs. Special attention to production 
and inventory control, equipment utilization, wage classification and cost reduction 
programs. Staff 

IE 421 Information and Control Systems. Preq: Senior standing, course in computer 
programming. 3(1-4) F,S. Investigation, analysis and development of integrated information 
processing systems, including management requirements, economic justification, and im- 
plementation approaches. Emphasis is on team projects which require analysis of manage- 
ment functions and specification of computer-based procedure design. Llewellyn 

IE 432 Methods Engineering. Preq: IE 352. 3(2-3) S. Intensive study of methods analysis 
and work-design procedures used in manufacturing and service industries. Micro-motion 



264 



study techniques and development of basic time data. Derivation of standard data and ap- 
plication to work load determination; use of the computer for setting time standards. Ap- 
plications to assembly line balancing, machine tending assignments, and managerial con- 
trols of production operations studied through the use of real-world production problems in 
project work. Staff 

IE 440 Furniture Management Analysis. Preq: IE 341. 3(1-4) F. Economic decision mak- 
ing applied to the furniture industry. The selection of equipment, materials, methods and 
strategy, from several feasible alternatives is studied with the aid of actual case histories. 

Prak 
IE 443 Quality Control. Preq: ST 361. 3(2-2) F,S,Sum. Statistical methods in quality con- 
trol; control charts for variables and attributes; inspection sampling plans and procedures. 
Industrial applications. Prak 

IE 452 Ergonomics. Preq: Senior standing. 3(2-2) F. Introduction to man-machine- 
environment systems design and evaluation; applications to consumer products, tools, 
equipment, and the workplace. Overview of ergonomic research methodologies. Considera- 
tion of man's anatomical, physiological, and psychological capabilities and limitations as 
related to systems design and human performance. Use of anthropometric data in design. 
Display and control systems design. Effects of environmental stress upon work performance, 
safety, and health. Pearson, Ayoub 

IE 453 Facilities Design. Preq: Sr. standing in IE. 3(1-4) F. Project of an industrial plant 
to be designed by small groups of students taking complete initiative and responsibility in 
procuring the information required by the realistic design for industrial enterprise. Charts of 
the facilities and a report justifying the design feasibility from the technical, economic, and 
environmental impact viewpoint produced by each group. Tompkins 

IE 454 Modeling of Man-Machine Systems. Preq: IE 401. 3(2-1) S. Design, improve- 
ment, and installation of man-machine systems with emphasis upon the integration of opera- 
tions research, engineering economy, and ergonomics for the analysis and assessment of 
systems performance. Analysis of systems typically found in industry; health care and safety 
fields; and government. Ayoub 

IE 470 Furniture Manufacturing Organization. Preq: IE 371. 2(2-0) F. The course is a 
summary of how management of a furniture company organizes for the most efficient com- 
bination of people, materials, machines and financial resources. The emphasis is on 
organization, interrelations. Ekwall, Clark 

IE 471 Furniture Manufacturing Organization Laboratory. Coreq: IE 470. 3(0-6) F. 
Senior "capstone" project requiring the design of a detailed organization structure and infor- 
mation systems for a furniture manufacturing situation. Ekwall, Clark 

IE 495 Project Work in Industrial Engineering. Preq: Sr. standing. 2-6 F,S. Special in- 
vestigations and research related to furniture construction and processing, and other 
assigned problems. Staff 

FOR GRADUATE AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

IE (OR, MA) 505 Mathematical Programming I. Preq: MA 405. 3(3-0) F.Sum. 
Mathematical methods applied to problems of planning, especially linear programming. 
Rigorous and complete development of the theoretical and computational aspects; discussion 
of applications. Staff 

IE (OR) 509 Dynamic Programming. Preq: MA 405, ST 421. 3(3-0) S.Sum. Theory and 
computational aspects of dynamic programming and its application to sequential decision 
problems. Elmaghraby, Nuttle 

IE 511 Advanced Engineering Project Analysis. Preq: IE 311, ST 421. 3(3-0) F. Analysis 
of project economy models with certainty assumed; advantages and limitations of models, ef- 
fects of income tax and depreciation methods. Risk analyses employing probability concepts; 
sensitivity studies and measures of utility. Estimation techniques and use of accounting in- 
formation, time series analysis and judgment factors. Planning and use of capital 
funds. Canada 

IE 515 Advanced Manufacturing Processes. Preq: IE 351 and EE 331 or equivalent. 3(3- 
0) F. The course examines manufacturing processes which involve chemical, electrochemical, 

265 



electrical thermo-electric and non-conventional mechanical, energy modes. Each process is 
investigated as to its underlying theory, state-of-the-art technology, interaction with the 
workpiece material, geometric capability and economics. Harder 

IE 517 Computer-Aided Manufacturing. Preq: IE 351 or equivalent and computer pro- 
gramming. 3(3-0) S. This course is concerned with the integration of the elements of pro- 
duction processes into a Computer Aided Manufacturing system (CAM). Students will 
generate programs for parts production in the APT language, for plotter verification, and for 
3-axis machining. The benefits of computer aided design and graphics in designing products 
for CAM are stressed. Industry case examples of machining, assembly and continuous pro- 
cess operations are studied. Harder 

IE 521 Management Decision and Control Systems. Preq: IE 421, CSC 421 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The problems and techniques required for systematic control of the pro- 
duction process and the business enterprise. Determination of control factors; collection and 
recording of data; and processing, evaluation and use of data. Illustrations of the applications 
and use of data processing equipment. Case problems. Smith 

IE (OR) 522 Organizational Systems Dynamics. Preq: ST 371, IE 421. 3(3-0) F. A study 
of the behavior of large organizations as simulated on a large digital computer and driven by 
suitable exogenous inputs. Basic theory of feedback control of systems; methods of modeling 
for continuous simulation, including aspects of management policy. Projects cover study, 
modeling and simulation of industrial, business, political, social organizations and systems; 
methods of changing system behavior by modifying parameters and model 
structure. Llewellyn 

IE 523 Inventory Control Methods I. Preq: ST 421, ST 515, OR 501. 3(3-0) S. Inventory 
policy with respect to reorder sized, minimum points and production schedules. Simple in- 
ventory models, models with restrictions, price breaks, price changes, analysis of slow- 
moving inventories. The smoothing problem in continuous manufacturing. Applications of 
linear and dynamic programming. Alvarez 

IE 525 Organizational Planning and Control. Preq: Three credit hours in operations 
management (such as EB 325, IE 308). 3(3-0) S. Organization theory and systems approaches 
to administrative functions. Human and social influences on management systems for plann- 
ing and control of activity. Policy, structure and procedure related to industrial engineering 
activities. Effects of automation. (To be taught alt. years.) Smith 

IE (PSY) 540 Human Factors in Systems Design. Preq: IE (PSY) 338 or IE 452; Coreq: 
ST 507 or 515. 3(3-0) S. Problems of the systems development cycle, including man-machine 
function allocation, military specifications, display-control compatability, the personnel 
subsystem concept, and maintainability design. Man as an information processing 
mechanism. Pearson 

IE 541 Systems Safety Engineering. Preq: IE 452, ST 371. 3(3-0) F,Sum. Problems in oc- 
cupational safety and health; preventative aspects involving product and work design, and 
personnel selection. Consideration of the methods used in accident-injury study, including 
field investigation, experimental engineering and biomedical research, statistical studies, 
and fault tree analysis. Managerial aspects of safety accountability. (To be taught in alt. 
years.) Pearson, Ayoub 

IE 546 Advanced Quality Control. Preq: ST 421. 3(3-0) S. The statistical foundations of 
quality control and its economic implications. Mathematical derivations. Sampling tech- 
niques are treated extensively with applications. Staff 
IE 547 Engineering Reliability. Preq: ST 421. 3(3-0) S. Methodology including applica- 
tion of discrete and continuous distribution models and statistical designs; reliability estima- 
tion, structure models, demonstration and decisions, and growth models. Examples of 
reliability evaluation and demonstration program. Staff 

IE (OR) 561 Queues and Stochastic Service Systems. Preq: MA 421. 3(3-0) F. General 
concepts of stochastic processes. Poisson processes, Markov processes, and Renewal theory 
are used in the analysis of queues with varied parameters. Applications to engineering 
problems. Stidham 

IE (CSC, OR, MA) 562 Advanced Topics in Computer Simulation. 3(3-0) S. (See com- 
puter science, page 207.) 



266 



IE (OR, MA) 586 Network Flows. Preq: IE (OR, MA) 505 or equivalent 3(3-0) S. 
Problems in the determination of the shortest chain, maximal flow, and minimal cost flow in 
networks. The relationship between network flows and linear programming; problems with 
nonlinear cost functions, multicommodity flows, and network synthesis. (Offered in alt. 
years.) Staff 

IE 591 Project Work. Preq: Grad. or sr. standing. 1-6 F,S,Sum. Investigation and report 
on an assigned problem oriented to design and application issues. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

IE 542 Physiological Criteria in Work Measurement. 3(3-0) F. 

IE 544 Occupational Biomechanics. 3(2-2) F. 

IE (PSY) 593 Area Seminar in Ergonomics. 1(0-2) F. 

International Student Orientation 

ISO 100 International Student Orientation. 0(1-0) F,S. Recommended for all foreign 
students new to the United States. Aims to acquaint them with the Raleigh community, 
American culture, University academic procedures and U. S. Government regulations. 

Weaver 

Landscape Architecture 

(See Design.) 

Liberal Arts 

LA 298 Special Projects in Liberal Arts. 1-3 F,S. 

LA (ALS) 490 International Seminar. 1(1-0) S. (See agriculture and life sciences, page 
189.) 

Marine Sciences 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAS (OY) 200 Introduction to the Marine Environment. Preq: High school physics, 
chemistry, algebra, trigonometry and biology or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. The ocean as a part of 
our environment including interactions between atmosphere and ocean, ocean circulation, 
physical and chemical properties of sea water, marine geology and marine biology. 

MAS (MAE) 471 Undersea Vehicle Design. 3(3-0) F,S. (See mechanical and aerospace 
engineering, page 275.) 

MAS (CE, OY) 487 Physical Oceanography. 3(3-0) S. (See physical oceanography, page 
293.) 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAS (ZO) 529 Biological Oceanography. 3(3-0) F. (See zoology, page 329.) 

MAS (OY, CE) 541 Gravity Wave Theory I. Preq: ESM 303 or PY 411. 3(3-0) S. 

Emphasis on basic mechanics of wave motions, mass transport induced by waves and various 

conservation laws with their applications in wave study. 

MAS (OY) 551 Ocean Circulation. Preq: ESM 303 or PY 411. 3(3-0) S. The mechanics of 

ocean circulation with emphasis on various simple models of circulation systems. 

MAS (CE) 581 Introduction to Oceanographic Engineering. 3(3-0) S. (See civil 

engineering, page 203.) 

MAS (GY) 584 Marine Geology. 3(3-0) S. (See geology, page 251.) 

MAS 591, 592 Marine Sciences Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Seminar gives perspective in the 

field of oceanology; topics vary. In order to obtain credit a student must deliver a seminar. 



267 



Materials Engineering 

MAT 200 Mechanical Properties of Structural Materials. Preq: CH 105 and the first 
course in ESM. 2(1-3) F,S. The dependence of mechanical properties of structural materials 
on macro-, micro- and crystalline structure; control of structure through treatment. Staff 

MAT 201 Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials. Preq: CH 105. 3(2-3) F,S. 
The fundamental physical principles governing the structure and constitution of metallic 
and nonmetallic materials of construction, and the relation of these principles to the control 
of properties. Staff 

MAT 301 Equilibrium and Rate Processes in Materials Science. Coreq: MAE 301. 3(2- 
2) F. Application of thermodynamic and kinetic principles to engineering materials in the li- 
quid and solid states. Magor 
MAT 302 Materials Processing. Preq: MAT 301. 3(3-0) S. Techniques for the processing 
of ceramic, metallic, and polymeric materials to control properties form, and appearance 
through considerations of thermal, chemical, mechanical, electrical, magnetic and nuclear 
energy. Both traditional and exotic processes are covered utilizing fundamental materials 
science and engineering science principles. Staff 

MAT 310 Physical Examination of Materials. Preq: MAT 320 or 200 or 201. 2(0-6) S. Ex- 
periments designed to demonstrate basic techniques in crystallography, x-ray diffraction, 
optical and electron microscopy, and thermal analysis. Staff 

MAT 311 Ceramic Processing I. Preq: MAT 201. 4(3-3) F. The basic chemical and 
physical laws underlying the processes and behavior of diverse ceramic compositions in the 
sequential manufacturing operations required to produce ceramic materials with controlled 
properties. Staff 

MAT 312 Ceramic Processing II. Preq: MAT 311. 3(3-0) S. Basic principles underlying 
the thermal processing of ceramics. Appropriate subject materials in basic and engineering 
sciences with particular reference to obtaining desired microstructures. Staff 

MAT 320 Physical Principles in Materials Science I. Preq: PY 208. 3(3-0) F. Introduc- 
tion to the fundamental physical concepts of ceramic, metallic, and polymeric materials. Re- 
lation between properties and structure. Staff 

MAT 321 Physical Principles in Materials Science II. Preq: MAT 320. 3(2-2) S. Intro- 
duction to the fundamental physical concepts of ceramic, metallic, and polymeric materials. 
Relation between properties and structure. Staff 

MAT 322 Phase Diagrams in Materials Engineering. Preq: MAT 301. 2(2-0) S. Ap- 
plications of thermodynamic principles to the construction and use of phase equilibrium dia- 
grams in materials engineering systems. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of phase dia- 
grams with microstructures. Staff 

MAT 400 Metallic Materials in Engineering Design. Preq: MAT 200 or 201. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Relationship of microstructure to the properties of materials. Control of microstructure to 
meet engineering design requirements. Moazed 

MAT 417 Ceramic Subsystem Design. Preq: MAT 312. 3(2-3) S. Individual and team 
study involving the interdependence of plant layout, processes, equipment and materials in 
the economic design of engineering systems and subsystems. The interdependence of plant 
layout, processes, equipment and materials in the economic design of engineering systems 
and subsystems. Discussion of design principles, sources of data, creativity and economic 
analysis to encourage original solutions to engineering problems. Harrell 

MAT 423 Materials Factors in Design I. Preq: MAT 450. 3(1-6) S. Selection of materials 
for specific engineering applications. Manufacturing processes and their relation to product 
use. Austin 

MAT 424 Materials Factors in Design II. Preq: MAT 423. 3(3-0) F or S. Selection of 
materials for specific engineering applications. Manufacturing processes and their relation to 
product use. Austin 

MAT 431 Physical Metallurgy I. Preq: MAT 321. 3(2-3) F. Alloy design; control of 
properties through microstructures; principles of heat treatment, strengthening 
mechanisms. Staff 



268 



MAT 432 Physical Metallurgy II. Preq: MAT 431. 3(3-0) F,S. Alloy design; control of 
properties through microstructures; principles of heat treatment; strengthening 
mechanisms. Staff 

MAT 435 Physical Ceramics I. Preq: MAT 321. 3(2-3) F. The physicochemical nature of 
classical and newly discovered ceramic materials. The course emphasizes the thermo- 
dynamics, crystal structure, structural imperfections and non-stoichiometry of ceramic com- 
pounds coupled with binary and multiphase equilibria. Effects of these parameters on 
properties. Davis 

MAT 436 Physical Ceramics II. Preq: MAT 435. 3(2-3) S. The physicochemical nature of 
classical and newly discovered ceramic materials. The first course emphasizes the thermo- 
dynamics, crystal structure, structural imperfections and non-stoichiometry of ceramic com- 
pounds coupled with phase equilibria. The second course is a detailed study of the thermal, 
mechanical, electrical and electronic properties of ceramic materials. Davis 

MAT 437 Introduction to the Vitreous State. Preq: MAT 301. 3(3-0) S. The formation, 
structure, physical and chemical modifications of vitreous systems. Practical industrial cal- 
culations and the fabrication of glass. Catalyzed nucleation and crystallization of glasses in 
relation to physical poroperties. Davis 

MAT 450 Mechanical Properties of Materials. Preq: ESM 207, MAT 200 or 201 or 310. 
3(2-3) F. Elastic, plastic, and fracture phenomena in solids including yielding, strain harden- 
ing, brittle fracture, creep and fatigue. Staff 

MAT 491 Materials Engineering Seminar. Preq: Sr. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Literature sur- 
vey of selected MAT topics. Oral and written reports and discussions. Staff 

MAT 493, 494 Ceramic Field Exercises I, II. Preq: Sr. standing. 1(0-3) F,S. Plant visita- 
tions, lectures by practicing ceramic engineers, reports on industrial organizations engaged 
in manufacture or use of ceramics. Discussions of professional organizations and 
ethics. Harrell 

MAT 495 Materials Engineering Projects. Preq: Jr. or sr. standing. 1-6 F,S. Advanced 
engineering principles applied to a specific project dealing with metallurgy, materials or 
general experimental work. A seminar period is provided and a written report required. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNGRADUATES 

MAT 500 Modern Concepts in Materials Science. Preq: MAT 321. 3(3-0) F. Appli- 
cations of current theories such as crystal theory, continuum and quasi-continuum theories, 
phenomenological theories, etc., to the solution of materials problems. Staff 

MAT 503 Ceramic Microscopy. Preq: GY 331. 3(2-3) F. Transmitted and reflected light 
techniques for the systematic study of ceramic materials and products. Staff 

MAT 509 High Vacuum Technology. Preq: CH 433 or MAE 301. 3(2-3) F,S. Properties of 
low-pressure gases and vapors. Production, maintenance and measurement of high vacuum; 
design, construction and operation of high vacuum high temperature facilities. Properties 
and reactions of materials which are processed, tested and/or utilized in high vacuum en- 
vironments. Staff 

MAT 510 Structure of Crystalline Materials. Preq: MAT 411; Coreq: MAT 500. 3(3-0) 
F. The lattice structure of crystals, including group theory applications, reciprocal lattice 
concept and crystal structure as related to bonding. Staff 

MAT 520 Theory and Structure of Materials. Preq: MAT 510. 3(3-0) S. Structure of li- 
quids and crystalline and amorphous solids used in engineering systems. Crystallinity and 
thermal properties. Ionic crystals in ceramic systems. The metallic state and alloy behavior. 
Emphasis on the relation between fundamental materials parameters and engineering 
properties. Staff 

MAT 527 Refractories in Service. Preq: MAT 411. 3(3-0) S. The physical and chemical 
properties of the more important refractories in their environment in industrial and labo- 
ratory furnaces. Harrell 

MAT 529 Properties of High Temperature Materials. Preq: MAT 201 and MAE 301. 
3(3-0) S. Effects of temperature on the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of in- 
organic materials; relationships between microstructure and high temperature properties; 
applications of ceramics, metals and composites at elevated temperatures. Staff 

269 



MAT 530 Phase Transformations in Materials I. Preq: MAT 500. 3(3-0) S. Kinetic 
theory- of transformations, nucleation theory, homogenous and heterogenous nucleation, 
growth of crystals, epitaxial thin films. Moazed 

MAT (MAE) 531 Materials Processing by Deformation 3(3-0) F. (See mechanical and 
aerospace engineering, page 275.) Bailey 

MAT (MAE) 532 Fundamentals of Metal Machining Theory. 3(3-0) S. (See me- 
chanical and aerospace engineering, page 275.) Bailey 

MAT 533, 534 Advanced Ceramic Engineering Design I, II. Preq: MAT 417. 3(2-3) F,S. 
Analysis and design of ceramic products, processes and systems leading to original solutions 
of current industrial problems and the development of new concepts of manu- 
facturing. Palmour 

MAT 540 Glass Technology. Preq: MAT 437. 3(3-0) F. Fundamentals of glass manu- 
facture including compositions, properties and application of the principal types of com- 
mercial glasses. Davis 

MAT 541, 542 Principles of Corrosion I, II. Preq: MAT 201 or CH 431 or MAE 301. 3(2- 
3) F,S. Fundamentals of metallic corrosion and passivity. The electrochemical nature of cor- 
rosive attack, basic forms of corrosion, corrosion rate factors, methods of corrosion pro- 
tection. Laboratory work. Staff 

MAT 550 Dislocation Theory. Preq: MAT 450. 3(3-0) F. Structure, energetics, stress and 
strain fields, interactions and motion of dislocations in solids. Staff 

MAT 556 Composite Materials. Preq: MAT 450. 3(3-0) F. Basic principles underlying 
composite materials properties as related to individual constituents properties and their in- 
teractions. Emphasis on the design of composite systems to yield desired combinations of 
properties. Fahmy 

MAT (NE) 562 Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering. Preq: Advanced under- 
graduate standing. 3(3-0) F. Reactor design and operating considerations determined by 
materials properties. The interrelations among materials compatibility effects, corrosion ef- 
fects and radiation effects in fission and fusion reactors. Staff 

MAT (NE) 573 Computer Experiments in Materials and Nuclear Engineering. Preq: 
Advanced undergraduate standing. 3(3-0) F. How to design and use Monte Carlo and dy- 
namical computer experiments. Beeler 

MAT 595 Advanced Materials Experiments. Preq: Sr. or grad. standing. 1-3. Advanced 
engineering principles applied to a specific experimental project dealing with materials. A 
seminar period provided. Written report required. Staff 

Mathematics 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I. Preq: MA 111 or equivalent completed in 
high school. Credit in both MA 102 and MA 112 is not allowed. 4(3-2) F,S,Sum. First of three 
semesters of unified analytic geometry and calculus course. Functions and graphs, limits, 
derivatives of algebraic functions and applications, indefinite integral, definite integral and 
the fundamental theorem of calculus, areas and volumes, plane analytic geometry. 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry. 4(3-2) F,S, Sum. Sets and logic, the real number 
system, polynominals, algebraic fractions, exponents and radicals, linear and quadratic 
equations, inequalities, functions and relations, logarithms, plane trigonometry. (Students 
in Engineering, Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Design, Agricultural Engineering and 
Mathematics Education who are required to take this course will not receive credit hours for 
MA 111 toward graduation requirements). 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A. Preq: MA 111 or equiv. completed in high 
school. Credit in both MA 102 and MA 112 is not allowed. 4(4-0) F,S, Sum. Limits and 
derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications, logarithmic and exponential func- 
tions, higher derivatives, definite integral, applications, integration techniques, multi- 
variate calculus, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, examples and applications in bio- 
logical and behavioral sciences. 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathematics with Applications. Preq: MA 111 or equi- 
valent completed in high school. 3(3-0) F,S, Sum. Introduction to symbolic logic; ele- 

270 



mentary probability — probability measures, conditional probability, expected value; ele- 
mentary matrix algebra; addition and multiplication, inverses, systems of linear equations. 
Markov chains; introduction to linear programming; applications in the behavioral, 
managerial, and biological sciences. 

MA 115 Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics. Credit in MA 115 is not allowed if 
student has credit for MA 102, 111, 112 or 114. Credit toward graduation is not given for MA 
115 in most curricula. 3(3-0) F,S, Sum. Basic skills are emphasized — addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, and division of fractions; rules of exponents; solving linear and quadratic 
equations; graphs; logarithms; "word" problems; right triangle trigonometry. Interwoven in 
the above topics is material of a less formal nature, indicating some of the recreational and 
useful aspects of mathematics. 

MA 116 Topics in Contemporary Mathematics. Preq: MA 115 or equiv. completed in 
high school. Credit in MA 116 is not allowed if student has credit for MA 102, 111, 112 or 114. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Primarily for Liberal Arts students. Instructors prepare a list of topics, or 
modules, from which each student chooses four to study for the semester. Examples of 
modules which are and/or have been offered include: the 4th Dimension, Numbers and Sets, 
Mathematics in Biology, Puzzles and Graphs, Cryptography, Mathematical Games, Mathe- 
matics in Finance, Mathematics in Music, Probability, Statistics, and Computing 
Machines. 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance. Preq: MA 111 or equivalent, or 115. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 
Simple and compound interest, annuities and their application to amortization and sinking 
fund problems, installment buying, calculation of premiums of life annuities and life in- 
surance. 

MA 127 Recreational Mathematics. Preq: MA 111 or 115 or equiv. completed in high 
school. 3(3-0) S. Requires only algebra and trigonometry, but student engages in new type of 
mathematical thought. Games and puzzles, tricks, geometric figures, model building, 
fallacies, paradoxes, curiosities, anecdotes, conjectures, famous problems, mathematical 
humor and more. Mathematical treatments involve number theory, set theory, algebra, 
topology, combinatorics, geometry, probability, analysis, computer science, math history. 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II. Preq: MA 102. 4(4-0) F,S,Sum. Second of 
three semesters of unified analytic geometry and calculus course. Applications of definite 
integral. Transcendental functions, methods of integration, polar coordinates, parametric 
equations, introduction to infinite series. 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III. Preq: MA 201. 4(4-0) F,S,Sum. Third of 
three semesters of unified analytic geometry and calculus course. Brief introduction to de- 
terminants and matrices, vector functions, analytic geometry of three dimensions and partial 
differentiation, multiple integration, applications. Line integral and Green's Theorem. 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry and Calculus B. Preq: MA 112. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Sequences, 
series, Taylor's Theorem, trigonometric functions, difference equations, differential equa- 
tions, examples and applications in biological and behavioral sciences. 

MA 214 Elementary Probability. Preq: MA 112 or 102. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum,. Basic concepts, 
elementary counting procedures, conditional probability, discrete random variables, infinite 
sample spaces, continuous random variables, continuous time stochastic processes, examples 
and applications in biological and behavioral sciences. 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I. Preq: MA 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 
First order equations, applications, linear equations of higher order, applications to 
mechanical and electrical systems, series solutions, special functions, Laplace transforms. 

MA 312 Introduction to Differential Equations. Preq: MA 201 (202 desirable). 3(3-0) 
F,S. First order differential equations, basic theory and applications of linear equations. 
Systems of linear equations, matrix methods, series solutions, Laplace transforms, existence 
and uniqueness. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 401 Applied Differential Equations II. Preq: MA 301 or 312 . 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. The 
wave, heat and Laplace equations. Solutions by separation of variables and expansion in 
Fourier Series or other appropriate orthogonal sets. 

271 



MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra. Preq: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 
Sets and mappings; equivalence relations; groups, homomorphisms, cosets, Cayley's 
Theorem, symmetric groups, quotient groups, rings, integral domains; Euclidean algo- 
rithms, polynominal rings, ideals, quotient rings. 

MA 404 Affine and Projective Geometry. Preq: MA 403 and 405. 3(3-0) S. Introduction to 
geometry of Euclidean, affine and projective spaces with emphasis on important groups of 
symmetries of these spaces. 

MA 405 Introduction to Linear Algebra and Matrices. Preq: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. Linear equations, linear dependence and vector spaces, inner products, linear 
transformations and matrices, operations with matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and re- 
duction of matrices to diagonal forms, introduction to quadratic forms, applications. (A 
special section, MA 405M, is given for mathematics majors.) 

MA 408 Foundations of Euclidean Geometry. Preq: MA 403. 3(3-0) F. A critique of Eu- 
clid's Elements, incidence and order properties, congruence of triangles, absolute and non- 
Euclidean geometry, the parallel postulate, real numbers and geometry. 

MA 410 Theory of Numbers. Preq: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) S. Concerned with in- 
vestigation of arithmetic properties of the integers. Congruences, arithmetic functions, quad- 
ratic residues, the quadratic reciprocity Law of Gauss, primitive roots, diophantine equa- 
tions, and algebraic number fields. 

MA 421 Introduction to Probability. Preq: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Axioms 
of probability, conditional probability, combinational analysis, random variables, ex- 
pectation, simple stochastic processes. 

MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I. MA 202 (403 desirable). 3(3-0) F. Real number system, 
functions and limits, topology on the real line, continuity, differential and integral calculus 
for functions of one variable. Infinite series. 

MA 426 Mathematical Analysis II. Preq: MA 425 and 405. 3(3-0) S. Uniform con- 
vergence, calculus of several variables, topology in n-dimensions, limits, continuity, dif- 
ferentiability, implicit functions, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals. 

MA (CSC) 427 Introduction to Numerical Analysis I. Preq: MA 301 or 312 and 

programming language proficiency. 3(3-0) F. Designed for undergraduate students in any de- 
partment who wish knowledge of theory and practice of computational procedure using a 
digital computer. Approximation of functions by interpolating polynomials. Numerical dif- 
ferentiation and integration. Solution of systems of ordinary differential equations both in- 
itial value and boundary value problems. Computer applications and techniques stressed. 

MA (CSC) 428 Introduction to Numerical Analysis II. Preq: MA 405 and pro- 
gramming language proficiency. 3(3-0) S. Designed for students who wish knowledge of 
computational procedures using digital computers. Solution of linear and nonlinear equa- 
tions. Matrices and eigenvalue calculations. Orthogonal polynomials and Gaussian quadra- 
ture. Curve fitting and function approximation by least squares. Smoothing formulas. Mini- 
max approximations. CSC (MA) 427 is not a prerequisite for this course. 

MA 430 Introduction to Applied Mathematics. Coreq: MA 301 or 312 and 405. 3(3-0) S. 
Formulation of scientific problems in mathematics terms, interpolation and evaluation of the 
solution. Topics discussed chosen from problems in managerial, behavior and life sciences as 
well as physical sciences. 

MA 433 History of Mathematics. Preq: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Develop- 
ment of mathematical thought and evolution of mathematical ideas examined in a his- 
torical setting. Biographical and historical content supplemented and reinforced by study of 
techniques and procedures used in earlier eras. 

MA 491 Reading in Honors Mathematics. Preq: Membership in honors program, con- 
sent of department. 2-6 F,S. 

MA 493 Special Topics in Mathematics. Preq: Consent of department. 1-6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 501 Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists I. Preq: MA 301 or equiv. 
3(3-0) F,Sum. Survey of mathematical methods for engineers and scientists. Ordinary dif- 
ferential equations and Green's functions; partial differential equations and separation of 

272 



variables; special functions, Fourier series. Applications to engineering and science are 
stressed. This course cannot be taken for credit by mathematics majors. 

MA 502 Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists II. Preq: MA 301 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Determinants and matrices; line and surface integrals, integral 
theorems; complex integrals and residues; distribution functions of probability. This course 
cannot be taken for credit by mathematics majors. 

MA (IE, OR) 505 Mathematical Programming I. (See industrial engineering, page .) 
3(3-0) F,Sum. 

MA 511 Advanced Calculus I. Preq: MA 301 or 312. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Fundamental 
theorems on continuous functions, convergence theory of sequences, series and integrals; the 
Riemann integral. 

MA 512 Advanced Calculus II. Preq: MA 301 or 312 (3-0) F,S,Sum. General theorems of 
partial differentiation; implicit function theorems; vector calculus in 3-space; line and sur- 
face integrals; classical integral theorems. 

MA 513 Introduction to Complex Variables. Preq: MA 511 or 425. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 
Operations with complex numbers, derivatives, analytic functions, integrals, definitions and 
properties of elementary functions, multivalued functions, power series, residue theory and 
applications, conformal mapping. 

MA 514 Methods of Applied Mathematics. Preq: MA 511 or 425. 3(3-0) S. Introduction to 
integral equations, the calculus of variations and difference equations. 

MA 515 Linear Functional Analysis I. Preq: MA 426. 3(3-0) F. Metric spaces; Lebesgue 
measure and integration; L p and / p spaces; Reisz-Fischer and Reisz representation theorems; 
normed linear spaces and Hilbert spaces. 

MA 516 Linear Functional Analysis II. Preq: MA 515. 3(3-0) S. Basic theorems in 
Banach spaces, dual spaces, weak topologies; basic theorems in Hilbert spaces, and detailed 
theory of linear operators on Hilbert spaces; spectral theorem for self-adjoint completely con- 
tinuous linear operators. 

MA 517 Introduction to Topology. Preq: MA 426. 3(3-0) F,S. Sets and functions, metric 
spaces, topological spaces, compactness, separation, connectedness. 

MA 518 Calculus on Manifolds. Preq: MA 426. 3(3-0) S. Calculus of several variables 
from a modern viewpoint. Differential and integral calculus of several variables, vector func- 
tions, integration on manifolds, Stoke's and Green's Theorems, vector analysis. 

MA 520 Linear Algebra. Preq: MA 405. 3(3-0) F,S. Vector spaces, linear mappings and 
matrices, determinants, inner product spaces, bilinear and quadratic forms, canonical forms, 
spectral theorem. 

MA 521 Fundamentals of Modern Algebra. Preq: MA 403 and 520. 3(3-0) S. Groups, nor- 
mal subgroups, quotient groups, Cayley's Theorem, Sylow's Theorem. Rings, ideals and 
quotient rings, polynomial rings. Fields, extension fields, elements of Galois theory. 

MA 523 Topics in Applied Mathematics. Coreq: MA 515, 520. 3(3-0) F. Formulation of 
scientific problems in mathematical terms, interpretation and evaluation of the mathe- 
matical analysis of the resulting models. Problems in behavioral and biological sciences and 
in mechanics of discrete and continuous systems. Discussions of optimization and the cal- 
culus of variations. 

MA 524 Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences I. Preq: MA 405, 512. 3(3-0) F. 
Green's functions and two point boundary value problems; elementary theory of dis- 
tributions; generalized Green's functions. Finite and infinite dimensional inner product 
spaces; Hilbert spaces; completely continous operators; integral equations; the Fredholm al- 
ternative; eigenfunction expansions; applications to potential theory. Nonsingular and sin- 
gular Sturm-Liouville problems; Weil's Theorem. 

MA 525 Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences II. Preq: MA 524. 3(3-0) S. 
Distribution theory in n-spaces; Fourier transforms; partial differential equations, 
generalized solutions, fundamental solutions. Cauchy problems, wave and heat equations, 
well-set problems. Laplace's equations, the Dirichlet and Neumann problems, integral equa- 
tions of potential theory, Green's functions, eigenfunction expansions. 



273 



MA (CSC) 529 Numerical Analysis I. Preq: MA 511 or equivalent, MA 405. 3(3-0) F. For 
graduate and advanced undergraduate students who wish to learn the theory of numerical 
analysis of sytems of linear equations, solutions to nonlinear equations, interpolation theory, 
and divided differences. Understanding theory behind the various techniques and their error 
estimates. Illustrations of use and limitations of these methods on the computer. 

MA (CSC) 530 Numerical Analysis II. Preq: MA (CSC) 529. 3(3-0) S. Continuation of 
CSC (MA) 529. Numerical integration, numerical solutions of ordinary differential equa- 
tions, and numerical solutions of partial differential equations. 

MA 532 Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations. Preq: MA 301 or 312, MA 405, ad- 
vanced calculus. 3(3-0) S. Existence and uniqueness theorems, systems of linear equations, 
fundamental matrices, matrix exponential, series solutions, regular singular points; plane 
autonomous systems, stability theory. 

MA 534 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations. Preq: MA 425 or MA 511, MA 
301 or MA 312. 3(3-0) F. Theory of characteristics and classification of second order equa- 
tions, existence, uniqueness and representation of solutions for the wave equation, Dirichlet 
and Neumann boundary-value problems for the Laplace equation, potential theory in two 
and higher dimensional domains, mean-value theorem and the maximum principle, Green's 
identities, initial boundary-value problems of heat equation and wave equation. Maximum 
principle of parabolic equation, method of eigenfunction expansions, Fourier series and 
Fourier transforms. 

MA (CSC) 536 Theory of Sequential Machines. Preq: CSC 412 or grad. standing. 3(3-0) 
F. Sequential machine identification experiments. Finite-Memory machines. Special classes 
of machines. Decomposition of sequential machines. Linear sequential machines. Se- 
quential relations of finite-state machines. 

MA (CSC) 537 Theory of Computability. Preq: CSC 412 or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Tur- 
ing Machines. Primitive recursion functions. The u-operator, u-recursive functions. Godel 
numbering. Equivalence of Turing Machines and u-recursion. Undecidable predicates. Uni- 
versal Turing Machines. Other formulations of effective computability. 

MA (ST) 541 Theory of Probability I. Preq: MA 425 or 511. 3(3-0) F,Sum. Axioms, com- 
binatorial analysis, conditional probability, independence random variables, expectation, 
special discrete and continuous distributions, probability and moment generating functions, 
central limit theorem, laws of large numbers, branching processes, recurrent events, random 
walk. 

MA (ST) 542 Introduction to Stochastic Processes. Preq: MA 405, 541. 3(3-0) S. (See 
statistics, page 000.) Markov chains and Markov processes, Poisson process, birth and death 
processes, queuing theory, renewal theory, stationary processes, Brownian motion. 

MAT 545 Set Theory and Foundations of Mathematics. Preq: MA 403. 3(3-0) S. Logic 
and the axiomatic approach, the Zermelo-Fraenkel axioms and other systems, algebra of sets 
and order relations, equivalence of the Axiom of Choice, one-to-one correspondences, cardi- 
nal and ordinal numbers, the Continuum Hypothesis. 

MA (PY) 555 Mathematical Introduction to Celestial Mechanics. Preq: One year of 
advanced calculus 3(3-0) F. Central orbits, N-body problems, 3-body problems, Hamilton- 
Jacobi theory, perturbation theory, applications to motion of celestial bodies. 

MA (PY) 556 Orbital Mechanics. Preq: MA 301, 405, or knowledge of elementary 
mechanics and computer programming. 3(3-0) S. Keplerion motion, iterative solutions, 
numerical integration, differential corrections and space navigation, elements of proba- 
bility, least squares, sequential estimation, Kalman fields. 

MA (BMA, ST) 571 Biomathematics I. 3(3-0) F. (See biomathematics, page 195.) 

MA (BMA, ST) 572 Biomathematics II. 3(3-0) S. (See biomathematics, page 195.) 

MA 581 Special Topics. Preq: Consent of department. 1-6 F,S. 

MA (CSC) 582 Special Topics in Numerical Solution of Linear Algebraic Equations. 

Preq: MA 405 or equivalent and a knowledge of computer programming. 3(3-0) S. A mathe- 
matical and numerical investigation of direct iterative and semi-iterative methods. Methods 
for the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices. 



274 



MA (CSC) 583 Special Topics in the Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential 
Equations. Preq: Knowledge to the level of CSC 427. 3(3-0) S. Numerical methods for initial 
value problems including predictor-corrector, Runge-Kutta, hybrid and extrapolation 
methods; stiff systems; shooting methods for two point boundary value problems; weak, ab- 
solute and relative stability results. 

MA (CSC) 584 Special Topics in the Numerical Solution of Partial Differential 
Equations. Preq: Knowledge to the level of CSC 427-428. 3(3-0) F. Numerical methods for 
the solutions of parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations including 
stability and convergence results. 

MA (OR, CSC) 585 Graph Theory. Preq: MA 405. 3(3-0) F. (See operations research, 
page 287.) 

MA (OR, IE) 586 Network Flows. Preq: MA (OR.IE) 505 or equiv. S. (See operations 
research, page 287.) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MA 507 Analysis for Secondary Teachers. 3(3-0). 

MA 508 Geometry for Secondary Teachers. 3(3-0). 

MA 509 Abstract Algebra for Secondary Teachers. 3(3-0). 

MA 510 Selected Topics in Mathematics for Secondary Teachers. 3(3-0). 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

MAE 200 Mechanical Technology in Contemporary Society. 3(3-0). F,S. The role of 
mechanical and aerospace engineering in our present technological society with approaches 
used by engineers in solving problems. Topics include: power generation, modern flight, and 
transportation vehicles. 

MAE 205 Energy: Sources, Uses and Conservation. Preq: Soph, standing. Cannot be 
taken as a technical elective by students in School of Engineering. 3(3-0) F,S. Broad coverage 
of the field for concerned and energy conscious students. Sources both current and pro- 
spective, and the uses, limitations, and conservation of energy are considered from an in- 
dividual as well as an institutional point of view. (Technical background not required). 

MAE 216 Elements of Mechanical Engineering. Preq: ESM 205, PY 208 or 202. 3(3-0) S. 
An introduction to mechanical engineering emphasizing the application and extension of 
chemistiy, physics and mathematics to real engineering problems in analysis and design. 

MAE 261 Aerospace Vehicle Performance. Preq: MA 201, PY 205. 3(3-0) S. In- 
troduction to the problem of performance analysis in aerospace engineering. Aircraft per- 
formance in gliding, climbing, level and turning flight. Calculation of vehicle range and en- 
durance. Simple orbital mechanics. 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I. Preq: MA 202, PY 208 or 202. 3(3-0) F,S, 
Sum. Introduction to the concept of energy and the laws governing the transfers and trans- 
formations of energy. Emphasis is placed on thermodynamic properties and the first and 
second law analysis of systems and control volumes. Integration of these concepts into the 
analysis of basic power and refrigeration cycles is also studied. 

MAE 302 Engineering Thermodynamics II. Preq: MAE 301. 3(3-0) S. Emphasis on the 
application of basic principles to engineering problems with systems involving mixtures of 
ideal gases, psychrometrics, nonideal gases, chemical reactions, combustion, chemical equi- 
librium, cycle analysis and one-dimensional compressible flow. 

MAE 303 Engineering Thermodynamics III. Preq: MAE 301. 3(3-0) S. For non- 
mechanical engineering jrs. Thermodynamics of mixtures; thermodynamics of fluid flow, 
heat transfer, vapor and gas cycles, and applications. 

MAE 305 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I. Coreq: MAE 301. 1(0-3) F.Sum. Intro- 
duction to the theory and practice of measurement and experimental data collection. The 
components of the generalized measurement system are studied and their effects on the final 
result evaluated. Basic methods of data analysis as well as basic instrumentation for sensing, 
conditioning and displaying experimental quantities are covered. 



275 



MAE 306 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II. Preq: MAE 305, EE 331. 1(0-3) 
S,Sum. Specific types of measurements. Students evaluate and compare different instru- 
mentation for measuring the same physical quantity on the basis of cost, time required, ac- 
curacy, etc. 

MAE 307 Energy and Energy Transformations. Preq: MA 201, PY 212. 3(3-0) F. Energy 
transformation as permitted by the First Law and limited by the Second Law. Properties of 
ideal gases and actual gases; properties of vapors. Vapor power cycles; vapor refrigerating cy- 
cles, gas cycles for internal combustion engines and gas turbines. Elements of heat transfer. 

MAE 315 Dynamics of Machines. Preq: MAE 216, ESM 305. 3(3-0) S. A rational ap- 
plication of dynamics to the analysis of machines and mechanical devices to determine the 
motions resulting from applied loads and the forces and inputs required to produce specified 
motions. 

MAE 316 Strength of Mechanical Components. Preq: ESM 205; Coreq: MAT 201. 3(3-0) 
F. Stress, strain and deformation analysis of mechanical components and their strength de- 
termination based on material behavior under static and dynamic operating conditions. Ap- 
plications to basic machine components. 

MAE 355 Aerodynamics I. Preq: MAE 261, MA 301. 4(3-3) F. Introductory concepts of 
perfect fluid theory and incompressible boundary layers with application to computing the 
aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, wings and flight vehicle configurations. 

MAE 356 Aerodynamics II. Preq: MAE 355, 301. 4(3-3) S. Concepts of thermodynamics, 
compressible fluid flow and compressible boundary layers with application to computing the 
aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, wings and flight vehicles configurations at high 
speed. 

MAE 365 Propulsion I. Preq: MAE 355, MAE 301. 3(3-0) S. One dimensional internal 
flow of compressible fluids, combustion and thermochemistry problems. Applications to air- 
breathing aircraft propulsion system. 

MAE 371 Aerospace Vehicle Structures I. Preq: MAE 261, ESM 205. 3(3-0) F. Theory 
and concepts required for the analysis and design of flight vehicle structural members. 
Properties and selection of materials; methods of analysis for axial, torsional, flexural and 
transverse shear loadings of typical flight structure members. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAE 401 Energy Conversion. Preq: MAE 302. 3(3-0) F,S. Principles of thermo- 
dynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer and combustion applied to power generation. Prin- 
ciples feasibility, and limitations of conventional and direct energy conversion methods are 
studied. The economics of energy conversion. Present and possible future energy sources. 

MAE 402 Heat and Mass Transfer. Preq: MAE 302, MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. The funda- 
mental relationships of steady and transient heat transfer by conduction, convection, radia- 
tion and during changes of phase: mass transfer by diffusion and convection, simultaneous 
mass and heat transfer. 

MAE 403 Air Conditioning. Preq: MAE 302. 3(3-0) F. Study of the fundamentals in- 
volved in the design of summer and winter air conditioning systems. Psychrometrics: load 
calculations; piping arrangements and sizing; duct layout and sizing; energy sources and dis- 
seminators; performance and selection of pumps and fans; temperature and humidity 
control. 

MAE 404 Refrigeration. Preq: MAE 302. 3(3-0) S. Thermodynamic analysis of the vapor 
compression cycle, absorption refrigeration; optimization of multiple evaporator and multi- 
ple compressor systems; commercial refrigeration load calculations; desirable properties of 
refrigerants and brines, piping arrangement and sizing. 

MAE 405 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory III. Preq: MAE 306. 1(0-3) F. The final 
undergraduate course in the mechanical laboratory sequence emphasizing the experimental 
investigation of measurement problems involving typical mechanical engineering equip- 
ment systems. Also included are statistical treatment of data, experiment planning, en- 
gineering report preparation, and experience in oral technical presentations. 

MAE 407 Steam and Gas Turbines. Preq: MAE 302, ESM 303. or MAE 355. 3(3-0) S. 



276 



Fundamental analysis of the theory and design of turbo-machinery flow passages; control 
and performance of turbomachinery; gas-turbine engine processes. 

MAE 408 Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals. Preq: MAE 302. 3(3-0) F. Funda- 
mentals common to internal combusion engine cycles of operation. The Otto engine: car- 
buretion, fuel distribution, flame and spark timing, and altitude effects; the Diesel engine; 
injection knock, combustion, precombustion and scavenging as applied to reciprocating and 
rotary engines. 

MAE 409 Particulate Control in Industrial Atmospheric Pollution. Preq: MAE 301 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Combustion calculations and analysis of particulate emission and gases 
from industrial and utility power stations burning various types of fuel. State and Federal 
pollution codes, requirements for compliance and enforcement. Calculations and design of 
industrial equipment. Utilization of waste products. 

MAE 411 Machine Component Design. Preq: MAE 315, 316. 3(3-0) F. Applying en- 
gineering and materials sciences to the analysis and design of machine components in- 
cluding fasteners, springs, bearings, gears, shafts, clutches, brakes, couplings, etc. 

MAE 415 Mechanical Engineering Analysis. Preq: MAE 302, 315, 316, EE 331. 3(3-0) F. 
A logical method of problem solving through the integration of the physical sciences, en- 
gineering sciences and mathematics. Training in methods of analysis of real mechanical en- 
gineering problems. 

MAE 416 Mechanical Engineering Design. Preq: MAE 415. 4(3-2) S. Applying en- 
gineering and materials sciences to the total design of mechanical engineering components 
and systems. Consideration and utilization of the design process including problem defi- 
nition, solution synthesis, design analysis, optimization and prototype evaluation through 
design project activity. 

MAE 422 Direct Energy Conversion. Preq: MAE 301, EE 202 or 332. 3(3-0) S. Theory 
and application of direct energy conversion methods, including magnetohydrodynamic and 
electrogasdynamic generators, fuel cells, and other methods of current interest. Thermody- 
namic analyses, device characteristics, and design considerations. 

MAE 431 Thermodynamics of Fluid Flow. Preq: MAE 301, MA 301, ESM 303. 3(3-0) S. 
Application of one-dimensional compressible gas dynamics and perfect gas theory to analyze 
nozzle and diffuser flows, normal shocks, and constant-area frictional flows with and with- 
out heat transfer. 

MAE 435 Principles of Automatic Control. Preq: MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. Study of linear 
feedback control systems using transfer functions. Transient and steady-state responses. 
Stability analysis using rootlocus and frequency response techniques (Bode plots and Ny- 
quist diagrams). Active and passive compensation methods. Preliminary design and analy- 
sis of typical mechanical and aerospace automatic control systems. 

MAE 442 Automotive Engineering. Preq: Senior in engineering. 3(3-0) S. Designed to ac- 
quaint the student with the fundamental aspects of automotive engineering. Examines 
various automotive systems (engine, brakes, etc.) as well as their interactions in such areas 
as safety. Current practices and development for the future are considered. 

MAE 452 Aerodynamics of V/STOL Vehicles. Preq: MAE 355. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to 
the aerodynamics and performance of vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) and short take- 
off and landing (STOL) vehicles. The aerodynamics of propellers and rotors. Helicopter aero- 
dynamics. High lift devices. Relationship between design and economics for V/STOL ve- 
hicles. 

MAE 455 Boundary Layer Theory. Preq: MAE 355. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to the con- 
cept of boundary layers and the manner in which the boundary layer affects the lift, drag and 
heat transfer on aerospace vehicles. Included are discussions of the laminar and turbulent 
boundary layers in compressible flows. 

MAE 462 Flight Vehicle Stability and Control. Preq: MAE 261, 435. 3(3-0) F. Linear- 
ized dynamic analysis of the motion of a six degree-of-freedom flight vehicle in response to 
control inputs and disturbance through use of the transfer function concept. Control of dy- 
namic behavior by vehicle design (stability derivatives) and/or flight control systems. 

MAE 465 Propulsion II. Preq: MAE 365. 4(3-3) F. Performance analysis of components 

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and complete air-breathing propulsion systems. Performance analysis and design of liquid 
fuel and solid fuel, rocket propulsion systems. 

MAE (MAS) 471 Undersea Vehicle Design. Preq: MAE 355 or ESM 303. 3(3-0) F or S. 
Solution of problems encountered in the design of both submerged and semisubmerged ocean 
vehicles. Treatment of vehicle drag and lift, bouyancy effects, vehicle propulsion and 
systems integration. 

MAE 472 Aerospace Vehicle Structures II. Preq: MAE 371. 4(3-3) S. A continuation of 
MAE 371 emphasizing specialized topics such as semi-monocoque structures, deflection of 
structures, indeterminate structures, torsion analysis. Laboratory demonstration of the 
theory and application of resistance strain gages, load-stress-deflection tests on typical flight 
vehicle structure components, the determination of basic materials properties, and cor- 
relation of tests and analytical results. 

MAE 478 Aerospace Vehicle Design I. Preq: MAE 356, 472; Coreq: MAE 462, 465. 2(2-0) 
F. A synthesis of previously acquired theoretical and empirical knowledge and application to 
the design of practical aerospace vehicle systems. 

MAE 479 Aerospace Vehicle Design II. Preq: MAE 478. 3(1-6) S. A synthesis of pre- 
viously acquired theoretical and empirical knowledge and application to the design of prac- 
tical aerospace vehicle systems. 

MAE 495 Special Topics in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 1-3 F,S. Offered 
as needed to present new or special MAE subject matter. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAE 501 Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics. Preq: MAE 302; MA 401 or MA 
511. 3(3-0) F. Thermodynamics of a general reactive system; conservation of energy and the 
principles of increase of entropy; the fundamental relation of thermodynamics; Legendre 
transformations; equilibrium and stability criteria in different representation; general rela- 
tions; chemical thermodynamics; multi-reaction system; ionization; irreversible thermo- 
dynamics; the Onsager relation; applications to thermoelectric, thermomagnetic and dif- 
fusional processes. 

MAE 502 Advanced Energy Systems. Preq: MAE 401. 3(3-0) F. An engineering examina- 
tion of energy sources, both conventional and proposed. Review of existing energy conversion 
systems and a critical examination of advanced systems, such as magnetohydrodynamics, 
fuel cells, solar, geothermal, wind, tides, thermal gradients in oceans and the hydrogen 
economy. 

MAE 503 Advanced Power Plants. Preq: MAE 401. 3(3-0) F. A critical analysis of the 
energy balance of thermal power plants, thermodynamics and economic evaluation of al- 
ternate schemes of development; study of recent developments in the production of power. 

MAE 504 Fluid Dynamics of Combustion I. Preq: MAE 301, MAE 355 or ESM 303. 3(3- 
0) F. Gas-phase thermochemistry including chemical equilibrium and introductory chemical 
kinetics. Homogenous reaction phenomena. Subsonic and supersonic combustion waves in 
premixed reactants (deflagration and detonation). Effects of turbulence. Introduction to dif- 
fusion flame theory. 

MAE 505 Heat Transfer Theory and Applications. Preq: MAE 402 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
F. Development of basic equations for steady and transient heat and mass transfer processes. 
Emphasis is placed on the application of the basic equations to engineering problems in the 
areas of conduction, convection, mass transfer and thermal radiation. 

MAE 506 Advanced Automotive Energy Systems. Preq: MAE 408. 3(3-0) S. A critical 
study of the various cycles and energy sytems for automotive transportation is carried out. 
The feasibility of automotive Rankine cycle power plants. Sterling engines, gas turbines and 
hydrogen-air fueled engines is discussed. Means of improving the efficiency and exhaust 
emissions of internal combustion engines and the use of alternative fuel sources are con- 
sidered. 

MAE 513 Machine Vibration and Control. Preq: MAE 315 or 472. Coreq: MA 511. 3(3-0) 
F. Modeling of mechanical systems for vibration analysis and presentation of exact and ap- 
proximate solution techniques. Techniques of vibration control are presented and ex- 
perience on the analog computer is provided. 

278 



MAE 514 Industrial Noise Control. Preq: MAE 315. 3(2-3) S. Provides definition of the 
industrial noise problem, development of analytical problem solving skills, introduction to 
instrumentation, involvement in design project, laboratory demonstrations. 

MAE 517 Instrumentation in Sound and Vibration Engineering. Preq: EE 331. Coreq: 
MAE 513. 3(3-0) F. This course is devoted to a presentation of measurement techniques and 
the theory and operation of transducers and amplifiers. An introduction to signal analysis 
techniques such as power spectral density and correlation is also provided. 

MAE 518 Acoustic Radiation I. Preq: MA 301 and MAE 356 or ESM 303. 3(3-0) F. An 
introduction to the principles of acoustic radiation from vibrating bodies and their related 
fields. The radiation of simple sources, the propagation of sound waves in confined spaces 
and transmission through different media are considered. 

MAE 519 Theory of Noise in Transportation Systems. Preq: MAE 550. 3(3-0) S. A study 
of the basic noise generating mechanisms encountered in transportation systems. Coverage 
includes jet noise, propeller noise, helicopter noise, fan and compressor noise, aircraft in- 
duced community noise, surface vehicle noise models and efforts to control noise in trans- 
portation systems. 

MAE 525 Advanced Flight Vehicle Stability and Control. Preq: MAE 462. 3(3-0) F. Pre- 
liminary analysis and design of flight control systems to include autopilots and stability aug- 
mentation systems. Study of effects of inertial cross-coupling and nonrigid bodies on vehicle 
dynamics. 

MAE 526 Inertial Navigation Analysis and Design. Preq: MAE 435 or 462. 3(3-0) S. 
Performance analysis and engineering design of inertial navigation components, subsystems 
and systems. Development of transfer functions and application of linear system techniques 
to determine stability, transient response and errors of gyroscopes, accelerometers, stable 
platforms and inertial alignment systems. Error analysis and its significance. Preliminary 
analysis and design of typical inertial navigation systems for aircraft and marine vehicles. 

MAE (MAT) 531 Materials Processing by Deformation. Preq: Six hours of solid 
mechanics and/or materials. 3(3-0) F. The course involves a presentation of the mechanical 
and metallurgical fundamentals of materials processing by deformation. Topics to be dis- 
cussed include: principles of metal working friction, forging, rolling, extrusion, drawing, high 
energy rate forming, chipless forming techniques, manufacturing system concept in pro- 
duction. 

MAE (MAT) 532 Fundamentals of Metal Machining Theory. Preq: Six hours of solid 
mechanics and/or materials. 3(3-0) S. The course involves a presentation of the mechanical 
and metallurgical fundamentals of metal machining. Topics to be discussed include: 
mechanics of machining, temperatures generated, tool life and tool wear, lubrication, grind- 
ing process, electrical machining processes, surface integrity, economics, nomenclature of 
cutting tools. 

MAE 533 Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical and Aeronautical Systems I. Coreq: 
MAE 415 or Preq: MAE 472. 3(3-0) F. Concepts and applications of the finite element 
method for stress and deformation analysis. Explanation and application of a general pur- 
pose finite element program for stress and deformation analysis of simple structures and 
load-carrying components. 

MAE 534 Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical and Aeronautical Systems II. Preq: 
MAE 533. 3(3-0) S. This course extends the finite element study, initiated in MAE 533, for 
stress analysis to other fields of interest in mechanical and aerospace engineering. Topics 
considered include vibration and frequency analysis, heat transfer, and potential flow. Two 
topics of advanced stress analysis, thin shells and the bending of plates are also included. 
MAE 535 Experimental Stress Analysis. Preq: MAE 316 or 371. 3(2-3) F. Theoretical 
and experimental techniques of strain and stress analysis with emphasis on electrical strain 
gages and instrumentation, brittle coatings, grid brittle coatings, grid methods and an intro- 
duction to photoelasticity. Laboratory includes an investigation and complete report of a 
problem chosen by the student under the guidance of the instructor. 

MAE 536 Photoelasticity. Preq: MAE 316 or 371. 3(2-3) S. Theory and experimental tech- 
niques of two- and three-dimensional photoelasticity including photoelastic coatings, photo- 
plasticity and an application of photoelastic methods to the determination of stress-strain 

279 



distributions in loaded members. Laboratory includes an investigation and complete report of 
a problem chosen by the student under the guidance of the instructor. 

MAE 540 Advanced Air Conditioning Design. Preq: MAE 403, 404. 3(3-0) F. The design 
of heating and air-conditioning systems; the preparation of specifications and performance 
tests on heating and air-conditioning equipment. 

MAE 541 Advanced Machine Design I. Preq: MAE 416. 3(3-0) F. An advanced inte- 
grated treatment of stress analysis and materials engineering devoted to current rational 
methods of analysis and design applicable to mechanical components. Primary attention 
placed on the determination and prediction of strength, life, and deformation characteristics 
of machine components as dictated by performance requirements. 

MAE 550 Aerothermodynamics. Preq: MAE 301, MAE 355 or ESM 303. 3(3-0) F. Re- 
view of basic thermodynamics pertinent to gas dynamics. Detailed development of the 
general equations governing gas motion in both differential and integral form. Simpli- 
fication of the equations to those for specialized flow regimes. Similarity parameters. Ap- 
plications to simple problems in various flow regimes. 

MAE 551 Airfoil Theory. Preq: MAE 355. 3(3-0) S. Development of fundamental aero- 
dynamic theory. Emphasis upon mathematical analysis and derivation of equations of mo- 
tion, airfoil theory and comparison with experimental results. Introduction to supersonic flow 
theory. 

MAE 552 Transonic Aerodynamics. Preq: MAE 356. 3(3-0) S. A detailed study of the 
latest theoretical and experimental findings in transonic aerodynamics, including two- 
dimensional and axisymmetrical flows. 

MAE 553 Supersonic Aerodynamics. Preq: MAE 356. 3(3-0) F. Equations of motion in 
supersonic flow. Prandtl-Meyer turns, method of characteristics, hodograph plane, super- 
sonic wind tunnels, supersonic airfoil theory and boundary layer shock interaction. 

MAE 554 Hypersonic Aerodynamics. Preq: MAE 356. 3(3-0) F. A detailed study of the 
latest theoretical and experimental findings in hypersonic aerodynamics. 

MAE 555 Aerodynamic Heating. Preq: MAE 356. 3(3-0) F. A detailed study of the latest 
theoretical and experimental findings of the compressible laminar and turbulent boundary 
layers with special attention to the aerodynamic heating problem. Application of theory in 
the analysis and design of aerospace hardware. 

MAE 556 Principles of Fluid Motion. Preq: MAE 355 or ESM 303. 3(3-0) S. Fundamen- 
tal principles of fluid dynamics. Mathematical methods of analysis are emphasized. Poten- 
tial flow theory development with introduction to the effects of viscosity and compres- 
sibility. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional phenomena are considered. 
MAE 557 Dynamics of Internal Fluid Flow. Preq: MAE 356 or ESM 303. 3(3-0) F. A 
general development of the governing equations of fluid motion with subsequent restriction 
to incompressible flow. Exact and approximate solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for 
internal laminar flow and elementary boundary layer theory. Applications include hydrody- 
namic lubrication, converging-diverging channel flows, entrance flows and turbulent in- 
ternal flow. 

MAE 558 Plasmagasdynamics I. Preq: MAE 356, PY 414. 3(3-0) F. Study of basic laws 
governing plasma motion for dense and rarefied plasmas, hydromagnetic shocks, plasma 
waves and instabilities, simple engineering applications. 

MAE 559 Molecular Gas Dynamics I. Preq: MAE 550. 3(3-0) F. Statistical mechanics as 
applied to the derivation of the equations of gas dynamics from the microscopic viewpoint. 
Collision processes, treatments of viscosity, heat conduction and electrical conductivity. 

MAE (EE) 565 Gas Lasers. Preq: MAE 356 or equivalent, PY 407. 3(3-0) F. Study of the 
principles, design and potential applications of ion, molecular, chemical and atomic gas 
lasers. 

MAE 570 Theory of Particulate Collection in Air Polution Control. Preq: MAE 409 or 
grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Particulate matter is classified and its properties are described. The 
motion of particles as applied to particulate collection is carefully analyzed. The elements of 
aerodynamic capture of particles are developed and applications in filtration and liquid 
scrubbing are considered. Fundamentals of acoustical, electrostatic and thermal precipi- 
tation are introduced. Sampling techniques and instrumentation are also considered. 

280 



MAE 586 Project Work in Mechanical Engineering. 1-6 F,S. Individual or small group 
investigaion of a problem stemming from a mutual student-faculty interest. Emphasis is 
placed on providing a situation for exploiting student curiosity. 

MAE 589 Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering. Preq: Advanced undergrad. or 
grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Faculty and student discussions of special topics in mechanical 
engineering. 

Meteorology 

MY 201 Atmospheric Environment. Preq: High school physics, chemistry, algebra, trigo- 
nometry, or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. Nature and processes of the atmosphere, interactions 
with land, sea, and life at the surface, relations to other components of the solar system; 
measurements and surveillance of the atmosphere and relations to climatology, weather fore- 
casting, weather modification and air pollution, and applications to various human 
activities. 

MY 386 Climate Near the Ground. Preq: MA 112, PY 221. 3(3-0) S. Analysis of basic 
physical states and processes at the interface of atmosphere with land surfaces and vege- 
tation in terms of the meteorological controls. Designed to serve needs in the various plant 
sciences. 

MY 411 Introductory Meteorology. Preq: PY 208 or 212; MA 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F. The 
physical setting: coordinates, planetary motion, gravitation; composition and structure of 
the atmosphere; insolation and diurnal phenomena; heat balance of the atmosphere; con- 
sequent distribution of variables of state, motion and weather. 

MY 412 Atmospheric Physics. Preq: MY 411 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Atmospheric effects on 
electromagnetic and acoustic transmission, and the consequent phenomena; terrestrial 
radiation; radar meteorology, visibility, atmospheric electricity and magnetism. 

MY 421 Atmospheric Statics and Thermodynamics. Preq: PY 208 or 212; MA 202. 3(3-0) 
F. The variables of state and thermodynamics of dry and moist air in the atmospheric 
system; water phase changes, hydrostatics and altimetry; stability, convection and dif- 
fusion; transfers at the surface; natural modification of air. 

MY 422 Atmospheric Kinematics and Dynamics. Preq: PY 208, MA 202; Coreq: MY 421 
or CI. 3(3-0) F. Properties and fields of atmospheric motion, and variations with time; forces 
and force fields; equilibrium and accelerated motions; the boundary layer and momentum 
transfer; continuity, pressure tendency and divergence-vorticity theorems. 

MY 435 Measurements and Data Systems. Preq: MY 421. 3(2-3) F. Meteorological in- 
struments, observations and networks; data communications, reduction and presentation; 
meteorological charts and diagrams, fundamental analysis of physical distributions. 

MY 441 Meterological Analysis I. Preq: MY 422, 435. 3(3-0) S. Theory and analysis of at- 
mospheric distributions, processes and developments in the three space dimensions and 
time. 

MY 443 Meteorological Laboratory I. Preq: MY 435; Coreq: MY 441. 4(0-10) S. Analysis 
of atmospheric distributions, processes and developments, employing regularly available 
meteorological data and the principles presented in prerequisite and corequisite courses. Stu- 
dent gains working knowledge of integrated atmospheric systems and processes through de- 
tailed analyses of natural situations. 

MY 444 Meteorological Laboratory II. Preq: MY 443. 4(0-10) S. Analysis and ap- 
plication of principles and concepts for predicting developments in the weather. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MY 512 Micrometeorology. Preq: MY 422. 3(3-0) F. Meteorology of the lowest hundred 
meters of the atmosphere with emphasis on the transport of momentum, heat, water vapor, 
and effluents and their transfer through the earth's surface. 

MY 521 The Upper Atmosphere. Preq: MY 411 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Meteorological conditions 
in the upper atmosphere from the stratosphere to the ionosphere. Compositions, mean dis- 
tributions and variabilities, and circulation and transport properties in the region. Physical 
theories. 



281 



MY 525 Numerical Weather Prediction. Preq: MY 524, CSC (MA) 427 or equivalent and 
some FORTRAN programming experience. 3(3-0) S. Physical and mathematical basis of 
numerical weather prediction with computer experiments to demonstrate principles and 
techniques. Topics include basic equations and methods of dynamical prediction, scale 
analysis, integral constraints on vorticity and energy, consistent sets of prediction equations, 
filtered equations, finite-difference methods, computational instability, relaxation methods, 
simple barotropic and baroclinic models, NWS operational models. Watson 

MY 555 Meteorology of the Biosphere. Preq: PY 205 or 211; CH 103 or 107; MA 102 or 
112. 3(3-0) F. For graduate students in the life sciences. The physical principles governing the 
states and processes of the atmosphere in contact with earth's surface of land, water, and life. 
Exchanges of heat, mass, and momentum are analyzed for various conditions of the at- 
mosphere and surface, and as a function of season, time, and geographic location. 

MY 556 Air Pollution Meteorology. Preq: MY 555 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The 
meteorological aspects of air pollution, especially for nonmeteorologists engaged in graduate 
training for work involving air pollution. 

MY 593 Advanced Topics. Preq: Consent of Staff. 1-6 F,S. Special topics in meteorology, 
provided to groups or to individuals. 

Microbiology 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MB 401 General Microbiology. Preq: BS 100, CH 223 or 220. 4(3-3) F,S. Rigorous intro- 
duction to basic principles and concepts of microbiology. Recommended for students in bio- 
logical and agricultural sciences curricula and for all students planning to take further 
courses in microbiology. Elkan, Luginbuhl 

MB (FS) 405 Food Microbiology. 3(2-3) F. (See food science, page 240.) 

MB 411 Medical Microbiology. Preq: MB 401. 3(3-0) S. A comprehensive study of the 
processes by which pathogenic microorganisms cause disease and the biological defense 
mechanisms by which the host resists. Methods of diagnosis, prevention and therapy of com- 
mon diseases of microbial origin will be considered. Luginbuhl. 

MB 490 Special Studies in Microbiology. Preq: Three courses in microbiology and CI. 1- 
3 F.S.Sum. Undergraduate students will be given an opportunity to participate in the 
current research program of a faculty member or to participate in a special study of an ad- 
vanced undergraduate topic. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MB 501 Advanced Microbiology. Preq: MB 401 (or MB 302). 3(3-0) F. A study in some 
depth of microbial structure and function, microbial ecology and characterization of impor- 
tant groups of microorganisms. Perry 

MB (FS) 506 Advanced Food Microbiology. 3(1-6) S. (See food science, page 240.) 

MB 514 Microbial Metabolism. Preq: MB 401, BCH 351 or BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. A study 
of the physiology and metabolism of microorganisms and their regulatory mecha- 
nisms. Dobrogosz 

MB 521 Microbial Ecology. Preq: Sr. or grad. standing. 1(1-0) S. A survey of the 
ecological role of microorganisms in our environment, their interaction with other living 
organisms and their function in biodegradation and recycling of organic matter in the eco- 
system. Perry 

MB (SSC) 532 Soil Microbiology. 4(3-3) S. (See soil science, page 314.) 

MB 551 Immunology and Serology. Preq: MB 401. 3(2-2) S. A study of the basic con- 
cepts and principles of antibody production, antigen-antibody interaction, and the labor- 
atory techniques for their demonstration and study. Lecce 

MB (ZO) 555 Protozoology. 4(2-6) S. See zoology, page 329.) 

MB (BCH, GN) 561 Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. 3(3-0) S. (See biochemistry, 
page 192.) 



282 



MB (BAE, CE) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. 3(2-3) S. (See civil engineering, page .) 

MB 571 Virology. Preq: BCH 551, MB 401. 3(3-0) An introduction to the fundamental 
aspects of virus-cell interactions. These include virus attachment and penetration, intra- 
cellular virus replication, metabolic changes occurring in cells as a result of virus infection 
and virus-induced cellular transformations. Johnston 

MB (BO) 574 Phycology. 3(1-4) S. (See botany, page 196.) 

MB (BO, PP) 575 The Fungi. 3(3-0) F. (See botany, page 196.) 

MB (BO, PP) 576 The Fungi— Lab. 1(0-3) F. (See botany, page 196.) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MB 590 Topical Problems. Preq: CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. 

Military Education and Training 

AEROSPACE STUDIES (AIR FORCE ROTC) 

AS 121 The Air Force Role in the Department of Defense I. 1(1-1) F. Initial course in the 
four-year AFROTC curriculum. Familarizes student with the mission, organization and doc- 
trine of the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Strategic Offensive Forces. Introduction to U.S. 
Strategic Defensive Forces. The laboratory, Corps Training, provides experience in drill 
movements, knowledge of customs and courtesies expected of an Air Force member, 
knowledge of Air Force career opportunities, and the life and work of the junior officer. 

AS 122 The Air Force Role in the Department of Defense II. Preq: AS 121 or equivalent. 
1(1-1) S. Continues study of U.S. Strategic Defensive Forces. Familiarizes student with 
Aerospace Support Forces and U.S. General Purpose Forces, including those of the Army, 
Navy and Marines. Corps Training stresses fundamentals needed to capably assume and dis- 
charge future responsibilities in AFROTC and the U.S. Air Force. 

AS 221 The Development of Airpower I. Preq: AS 122 or equivalent. 1(1-1) F. Airpower 
from the early years of powered flight through World War II. Emphasis on the development 
of employment concepts. Factors which have prompted research and technological change. 
Events which show the impact of airpower on strategic thought. Corps Training develops 
skills and further studies the junior officer environment. 

AS 222 The Development of Airpower II. Preq: AS 221 or equivalent. 1(1-1) S. Airpower 
from the end of World War II to the present. Emphasis on employment concepts, 
technological change, and the impact of airpower on strategic thought. Leadership ex- 
periences and study of junior officer environment in Corps Training. 

PROFESSIONAL OFFICER EDUCATION 

AS 321 National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society I. Preq: Four year 
AFROTC Cadets, AS 222; Two year non-veteran students, satisfactory completion of a six 
week field training course (see below). 1(3-1) F. The role of national security forces in con- 
temporary American society. The professional military as it relates to the American political 
and social system. Formulation of military policy is examined in terms of international and 
domestic constraints. A treatment of the development of modern defense strategy. The stu- 
dent studies and practices communicative skills. Corps Training provides for advanced 
leadership experience. 

AS 322 National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society II. Preq: AS 321. 
2(3-1) S. Continues the study of national security forces in contemporary American society. 
Focuses on strategy and management of modern conflict and formulation and imple- 
mentation of U.S. defense policy. Brief study of the Air Force Officer classification and as- 
signment system. Students develop their communicative skills and participate in advanced 
leadership situations in Corps Training. 

AS 421 Philosophy of Military Leadership. Preq: AS 322. 1(3-1) F. Class and laboratory 
include exploration and practical experience in the need for leadership and a study of human 
behavior and relations that affect military leadership. Professional self-discipline, imposed 
discipline of military law, and an examination of the variables affecting leadership. Em- 
phasis on developing the communicative skills, leadership abilities and basic knowledge re- 
quired of a future Air Force junior officer. 

283 



AS 422 Management Applications in the Military Environment. Preq: AS 421. 2(3-1) S. 
Class and laboratory study of and practical experience with management functions in the 
military environment. The planning, organizing, directing, controlling and coordinating 
functions of management; the command and staff functions in advising, problem solving and 
decision-making situations. Emphasis on developing communicative skills, leadership 
abilities and basic knowledge required of an Air Force junior officer. 

AS 499 Flight Instruction Program Ground School. 0(3-0) S. Develops aeronautical 
knowledge required by the Federal Aviation Administration for private pilots. It familiarizes 
students with the appropriate general and visual flight rules of Part 91 of the Federal Avia- 
tion Regulations, obtaining and evaulating of flight weather reports and flight planning ele- 
ments such as plotting courses, estimating time enroute and fuel requirements. Required in 
the Flight Instruction Program (FIP) for Air Force ROTC cadets. 

FIELD TRAINING COURSES 

AFROTC field training is offered during the summer months at selected Air Force bases 
throughout the United States. Students in the four-year program participate in four weeks of 
field training during the summer after their sophomore or junior year. Students applying for 
entrv into the two-vear program must successfully complete six weeks of field training prior 
to enrollment in AFROTC. 

Major study areas in the four-week field training program include junior officer training, 
aircraft and aircrew indoctrination, career-orientation, survival training, base functions and 
Air Force environment, and physical training. 

The six-week field training program covers all four-week field training program areas plus 
all of the subject matter received by four-year program cadets during their freshman and 
sophomore years in the General Military Course, including corps training. 

Military Science (Army ROTC) 

MS 101 Military Science I. 1(1-1) F. The mission and organization of the U.S. Army and 
an introduction to Army ROTC Advantages, opportunities and benefits of becoming an of- 
ficer in the Army are examined and discussed. Practical work in marksmanship and other 
skills such as rappelling is emphasized in Leadership Laboratory. Edgar 

MS 102 Military Science I. 1(1-1) S. A seminar approach which investigates current 
topics of interest to the Army. Instruction and practical work in the fields of leadership and 
management. Leadership Laboratory continues to emphasize MS 101 goals. Edgar 

MS 201 Military Science II. Preq: MS 101 and MS 102 or equivalent credits. 1(2-1) F. A 
survey of American military history to include an examination of how numerous variables 
such as the political, social, and economic systems have influenced the military establish- 
ment. Leadership Laboratory will continue to emphasize the application of leadership and 
management techniques during practical exercises. Rowley 

MS 202 Military Science II. Preq: MS 101 or MS 201 or equivalent credit. 1(2-1) S. Plan- 
ning organization and conduct of small unit operations. The second half of the semester will 
be devoted to developing land navigational skills. Leadership Laboratory continues to 
emphasize leadership and management training and in particular focuses upon classroom in- 
struction in a practical field environment. Rowley 

MS 301 Military Science III. Preq: MS I and MS II or prior military service, or comple- 
tion of ROTC basic camp or its equivalent. 1(2-1) F. Instruction in advanced leadership and 
management utilizing case studies and a seminar approach. The second half of the semester 
will be devoted to developing means of communication in an instructional atmosphere. 
Leadership Laboratory includes practical application of classroom work in a tactical en- 
vironment. Lupus 

MS 302 Military Science III. Preq: MS I and MS II or prior military service, or comple- 
tion of ROTC basic camp or its equivalent. 2(2-1) S. Planning, organization, and execution of 
military operations. A portion of the semester will be devoted to an examination of the 
numerous officer specialties in the Army. Leadership Laboratory continues to emphasize 
leadership and management training in addition to the development of practical military 
skills such as orienteering, rappelling, etc. Lupus 

MS 401 Theory and Dynamics of the Military Team. Preq: MS 302. 1(2-1) F. A seminar 
approach to military management procedures to include organizational theory, operational 

284 



techniques, staff planning and implementation, and the fundamentals of military law. 
Leadership Laboratory emphasizes the practical application of classroom instruction by ex- 
ercising full command and staff responsibility in planning and executing all phases of field 
training and leadership development. Kehoe 

MS 402 Seminar in Leadership and Management. Preq: MS 401. 2(2-1) S. Seminar ap- 
procah to leadership and management in the military environment, the problems of develop- 
ing nations, world position of the United States, and management of personal affairs. 
Leadership Laboratory continues to emphasize MS 401 goals, uses field training exercises as 
the medium for preparation for commissioning and subsequent active Army Service. Kehoe 

Music 

MUS 100 Instrumental Music. Preq: Satisfactorily passing audition. 1(0-5) F,S. The per- 
formance and study of the best in instrumental music. Assignments to various organizations 
made according to instrument played and individual interests and abilities. 

MUS 110 Choral Music. Preq: Satisfactorily passing audition. 1(0-4) F,S. The perfor- 
mance and study of the best in choral music. Assignments to various organizations made ac- 
cording to individual interests and abilities. 

MUS 200 Understanding Music. 3(3-0) F,S. To assist students in developing under- 
standing and comprehension of music heard today. Emphasis is upon evaluating musical ele- 
ments and content, form, style periods, and design. 

MUS 210 A Survey of Music in America. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. A historical survey of music in 
the United States from colonial times to the present, with emphasis on the major influences 
which have shaped the musical literature of America. The objective of the course is to de- 
velop an awareness and understanding of the indigenous musical forms and styles and of the 
role this music has played in the development of the important cultural traditions of the Un- 
ited States. 

MUS 215 Music of the 17th and 18th Centuries. 3(3-0) Alt. years. Examine selected 
European music from 1600 to 1800, emphasis on concepts of compositional style, reflections 
of certain broad cultural tendencies and purely musical phenomena. Study of specific forms 
and genres as they evolved during this period. 

MUS 220 Music of the 19th Century. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. Course designed to provide an in- 
sight into the significant musical forms of the western world in the 19th century. Subject 
matter will include an analysis of the musical literature of the prevailing forms, its composers 
and the relation of music to other art forms of the time period. 

MUS 301 Basic Music Theory I. 3(3-0) F,S. Introductory course for students with no for- 
mal musical background. Basic elements of music. Exercises in notation, ear training, writ- 
ten harmony, and the application through a study of selected compositions from the musical 
literature. 

MUS 302 Basic Music Theory II. Preq: MUS 301, CI. 3(3-0) F,S. Continuation of MUS 
301. Musical analysis of representative works. Further study of choral functions through writ- 
ten exercises. Compositions written by students using as a model a piece from the standard 
musical literature which employs principles studied throughout the course. 

MUS 320 Music of the 20th Century. 3(3-0) Alt. years. Traditions and innovations in 
representative music of this century are examined. Emphasis upon musical ideas and 
materials. 

MUS 401 Music Composition I. Preq: MUS 301 or 302 or CI. 3(3-0) F. Writing course 
designed to provide non-music majors experience in creating their own musical compositions. 
Students will learn basic skills in manipulating musical materials which include harmonic, 
melodic, rhythmic, and contrapuntal characteristics of all periods of music. 

MUS 402 Music Composition II. Preq: MUS 401 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Emphasis on 20th cen- 
tury compositional techniques. Study and construction of larger musical phrases and forms 
and the harmonic and contrapuntal principles employed within their construction. Study in 
techniques of orchestration. 

MUS 495 Special Topics in Music. 1-3 F,S. Offered to focus on new or special subject 
matter not covered by existing courses. 

285 



Nuclear Engineering 

NE 201 Applications of Nuclear Energy. Preq: PY 208. 3(3-0) S. An elementary introduc- 
tion to nuclear energy. Topics include radioactivity, fission and fusion, power production, 
isotopes, radiation detection, radiation safety, environmental effects and energy resources. 
The student is given a broad perspective of nuclear engineering and introduced to both fun- 
damentals and applications. Verghese, Stam 
NE 302 Fundamentals of Nuclear Engineering. Preq: NE 201, PY 410. 4(3-2) F. An in- 
troductory course in nuclear engineering. Topics include neutron physics, reactor theory, and 
reactor operations. Emphasis on basic principles underlying the design and operation of 
nuclear systems, facilities and applications. Laboratory sessions include the various techni- 
ques of radiation detection and measurement, reactor nuclear instrumentation, and reactor 
measurements. Stam 
NE 401 Reactor Analysis and Design. Preq: NE 302 or 419. 4(3-2) S. Elements of nuclear 
reactor theory and reactor operation, including neutron slowing down and diffusion, Fermi 
age theory, multigroup concepts, criticality of homogenous and heterogenous reactors, and 
reactor dynamics. Observation and measurement of reactor behavior and correlation with 
theory. Stam 

NE 402 Reactor Engineering. Preq: NE 302 or 419. 4(3-2) F. Engineering topics pertinent 
to the design of reactors are stressed, including heat transfer and fluid flow in reactors, rele- 
vant computer codes, power plant thermodynamics, and shielding. Laboratory experiments 
are included. Verghese 

NE 403 Nuclear Engineering Design Projects. Preq: NE 402. 3(2-3) S. Student projects 
in design of practical nuclear engineering systems. Preliminary designs are developed by 
teams with advice by faculty as needed, and reports are presented in oral and written form. 
Current and future systems are emphasized, and use of computers is encouraged. 

Gardner 
NE 404 Radiological, Reactor, and Environmental Safety. Preq: NE 302 or 419. 3(3-0) 
F. A basic course in health physics and the environmental aspects of nuclear power genera- 
tion. Topics include: biological effects of radiation, dose-role evaluation, radiation monitor- 
ing, and radiological safety; reactor effluents and radioactive waste disposal; regulations 
governing radiation exposure and the release of radioactivity into the environment; environ- 
mental impact of nuclear power plants. Elleman, Kohl, Zumwalt 

NE 405 Reactor Systems. Preq: NE 402. 3(3-0) S. Nuclear power plant systems, their 
design criteria, design parameters, and economics. Topics covered include: PWR, BWR, 
HTGR, their primary loops, auxiliary and emergency systems; containment; radwaste han- 
dling; reactor control systems and reactor operation; quality assurance; cost components of 
nuclear power. Bohannon, Saxe 

NE 412 Nuclear Fuel Cycles. Preq: NE 302. 3(3-0) S. Processing of nuclear fuel with 
description of mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fabrication, irradiation, shipping, 
reprocessing, and waste disposal. Fuel cycle economics and fuel cost calculation; burn-up 
calculations and design of reload cores; plutonium and thorium utilization. Verghese 

NE 414 Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation. Preq: NE students: EE 331, 332; EE stu- 
dents: NE 419. 3(3-0) S. Treats the instrumentation required for control and safety of a 
nuclear power plant. The dynamic behavior of a nuclear plant is developed so that the 
characteristics required of the instrumentation may be stated. Methods for combining the 
various measured parameters, e.g. neutron flux, coolant flow, coolant pressure, temperature, 
to achieve safe operation are discussed. Protection against loss-of-power. lightning, etc. are 
treated. Saxe 

NE 419 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering. Preq: PY 202 or 208. 3(3-0) F,S. Nuclear 
energy applications, including nuclear reactor materials, reactor theory, shielding, thermal 
and hydraulic analysis, and control. Uses of nuclear fission and its by-products in research, 
industry and propulsion. Major engineering problems are defined and methods of approach 
outlined. Course designed for students in other departments. Staff 

NE 491, 492 Nuclear Engineering Topics I, II. Preq: CI. Variable credit. 1-4 F,S. De- 
tailed coverage of special topics such as: radiation applications, quality assurance, reactor 
operation, reactor control, and nuclear measurements. 

Gardner, Verghese, Bohannon, Saxe, Stam 

286 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NE 501 Reactor Analysis. Preq: NE 302 or 419. 3(3-0) F. Principles of neutron motion in 
matter emphasizing the analysis of the nuclear chain reactor, including neutron mechanics, 
flux distributions, critical mass calculations, time behavior, two group model, and reactivity 
calculation. Murray 

NE 502 Reactor Design. Preq: NE 501. 3(3-0) S. Elements of design and operation, in- 
cluding reactor materials, thermal and hydraulic analysis, control and safety, and thermal 
and fast reactor systems. Siewert 

NE 505 Experimental Methods in Nuclear Engineering. Preq: NE 501, 511, Coreq: NE 
502, 512. 3(1-4) S. Laboratory experiments illustrate the principles and concepts covered in 
NE 501, 502, 511 and 512. Gardner, Stam 

NE (PY) 511 Nuclear Physics for Engineers. 3(3-0) F. (See physics, page 293.) 

NE 512 Radiation Applications. Preq: NE 511. 3(3-0) S. Applications of radiation inter- 
action principles to practical nuclear problems. Topics include radiological safety, effects of 
radiation on biological and structural materials, and industrial applications of radioisotopes 
and radiation. Zumwalt, Gardner 

NE (MAT) 562 Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering. Preq: Advanced un- 
dergrad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Reactor component design considerations determined by 
materials properties as well as by nuclear function are covered. Emphasis is placed on radia- 
tion effects and other concepts pertinent to the selection of materials for nuclear reactors for 
either terrestrial or space applications. Beeler, Fahmy 

NE (MAT) 573 Computer Experiments in Materials and Nuclear Engineering. 3(3-0) 
S. (See materials engineering, page 268.) Beeler 

NE (CE) 574 Environmental Consequences of Nuclear Power. Preq: CI. 3(3-0) S. En- 
vironmental consequences resulting from electrical power generation, with emphasis on 
siting, construction, and operation of nuclear power plants. Kohl, Zumwalt, Smallwood 

NE 591, 592 Special Topics in Nuclear Engineering I, II. Preq: CI. 3(3-0) F,S. Topics in- 
clude fast breeder reactors, nuclear fusion, computer techniques. Staff 

Nutrition 

NTR (ANS, FS) 301 Nutrition and Man. 3(3-0) F,S. (See animal science, page 189.) 

NTR (ANS, PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition. 3(3-0) F. (See animal science, page 189, or 

poultry science, page 302.) 

NTR (ANS) 416 Quantitative Nutrition. 3(1-6) F. (See animal science, page 189.) 

NTR 490 Nutrition Seminar. Preq: Sr. standing. 1 F,S. Reviews, analysis and dis- 
cussions of information and proposals relating to problems in human nutrition and allied 
areas. 

NTR 590 Topical Problems in Nutrition. Preq: Grad. or sr. standing. 1-6 F,S. Dis- 
cussions, readings and analysis of problems of current interest in nutrition and closely allied 
fields. 

Operations Research 

OR 501 Introduction to Operations Research. Preq: MA 405, 421. 3(3-0) F,Sum. OR ap- 
proach: modeling, constraints, objective and criterion. The problem of Multiple cirteria. Op- 
timization, Model validation. The team approach. Systems Design. Examples. OR 
methodology: mathematical programming; optimum seeking; simulation, gaming; heuristic 
programming. Examples. OR applications; theory of inventory; economic ordering under de- 
terministic and stochastic demand. The production smoothing problem; linear and 
quadratic cost functions. Waiting line problems: single and multiple servers with Poisson in- 
put and output. The theory of games for two-person competitive situations. Project manage- 
ment through PERT-CPM. Graduate Staff 

OR (IE, MA) 505 Mathematical Programming I. Preq: MA 405. 3(3-0) F,Sum. 
Mathematical methods applied to planning problems. Linear programming, a rigorous and 
complete development of the theoretical and computational aspects of this technique and a 
discussion of applications. Graduate Staff 

287 



OR (IE) 509 Dynamic Programming. Preq: MA 405, ST 421. 3(3-0) S.Sum. The theory 
and computational aspects of dynamic programming and its application to sequential de- 
cision problems. Elmaghraby, Nuttle 
OR 520 Theory of Activity Networks. Preq: OR 501, OR (IE, MA) 505. 3(3-0) S. Graph 
theory and network theory. The theory underlying: 1) deterministic activity networks 
(CPM): optimal time-cost trade offs; the problem of scarce resources; 2) probabilistic ac- 
tivity networks (PERTl: critical evaluation of the underlying assumptions; 3) generalized ac- 
tivity networks (GERT.GAN): applications of signal flow graphs and semi-Markov process to 
probabilistic branching; relation to the theory of scheduling. (Offered alt. years). 

Elmaghraby 

OR (IE) 522 Organizational Systems Dynamics. 3(3-0) F. (See industrial engineering, 
page 262.) 

OR (CHE) 527 Optimization of Engineering Processes. 3(3-0) F. (See chemical 
engineering, page 198.) 

OR (E) 531 Dynamical Systems and Multivariate Control. Preq: MA 301, MA 405 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to analytical modeling, control and optimization of 
dynamical systems based on state space and transfer function descriptions. Emphasis on 
linear, continuous-time and discrete-time systems. Topics include state variables, trans- 
forms, flow graphs, canonical forms, system response, stability, controllability and observ- 
ability, modal control, non-interacting control, observers, fundamental concepts of optimal 
control and estimation. Multidisciplinary applications chosen from biological, chemical, 
economic, electrical, mechanical and sociological systems. Gruver 

OR (IE) 561 Queues and Stochastic Service Systems. Preq: MA 421. 3(3-0) F. General 
concepts of stochastic processes. Poisson processes. Markov processes, and Renewal theory 
presented and used in the analysis of queues, starting with a completely memoryless queue to 
one with general parameters. Applications to engineering problems. Staff 

OR (CSC) 562 Advanced Topics in Computer Simulation. 3(3-0) S. (See computer 
science, page 207.) 

OR (CSC, MA) 585 Graph Theory. Preq: MA 231 or 405. 3(3-0) F,Sum. Basic concepts of 
graph theory, Trees and forests, Vector spaces associated with a graph. Representation of 
graphs by binary marices and list structures. Traversability. Connectivity. Matchings and 
assignment problems. Planar graphs. Colorability. Directed graphs. Applications of graph 
theory with emphasis on organizing problems in a form suitable for computer 
solution. Graduate Staff 

OR (IE, MA) 586 Network Flows. Preq: OR (IE, MA) 505 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 
Problems of flows in networks, including the determination of the shortest chain, maximal 
flow and minimal cost flow in networks. The relationship between network flows and linear 
programming. Problems with nonlinear cost functions, multi-commodity flows, and the 
problem of network synthesis. (Offered alt. years.) Graduate Staff 

OR 591 Special Topics in Operations Research. Preq: CI. 1-3(3-0) S. Individual or small 
group studies of special areas of OR. Course serves as a vehicle for introducing new or 
specialized topics. 

Pest Management 

PM 415 Principles of Pest Management. Preq: ENT 312, PP 315, CS 414. 3(3-0) S. This 
interdisciplinary course integrates knowledge needed for making sound pest management 
decisions. Topics include introduction to pest management concepts, importance of pest con- 
trol, rationale for integrated pest control, methods of pest management and examples of ex- 
isting and potential pest management programs. Emphasis on the incorporation of practices 
used for control of major classes of pests into management systems which least affect non- 
target organisms in the environment. Staff 

Philosophy 

(Also see Religion.) 

PHI 201 Logic. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. An introduction to the methods of deductive inference. 



288 



The concepts of validity and implication are defined and applied to statements and argu- 
ments. Staff 

PHI 205 Problems and Types of Philosophy. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. In this introductory course 
the matters discussed will always be those with a history of importance in philosophy, such 
as problems concerning God, freedom, justice, and the nature and objects of human 
knowledge. Staff 

PHI 300 Early Western Philosophy. 3(3-0) F. This course traces the philosophical move- 
ments of Western Civilization from the pre-Socratics of ancient Greece to the scientific 
revolution of the 17th century, with particular emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Bredenberg 

PHI 301 Modern Western Philosophy. 3(3-0) S. A critical survey of selected works of the 
major Western philosophers from the 17th century to the present. Metzger 

PHI (ED) 304 Philosophy of Education. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This course explores the fun- 
damental philosophical questions concerning education — namely, "What should we teach 
people, how should we teach it, and why?" The course is further concerned with exploring the 
very concepts of teaching and learning. Bryan 

PHI 305 Philosophy of Religion. 3(3-0) F,S. This course combines two approaches to the 
philosophy of religion: phenomenological and analytic. Given this dual approach, the course 
deals with the questions of the existence of God and of the language about God, including 
such traditional problems as verification, meaning, evil, immortality, and creation. Stalnaker 

PHI 306 Philosophy of Art. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. The general objective of this course is to 
analyze concepts and theories encountered in discussion of art in such a way as to illuminate 
the nature of works of art, esthetic experiences, and art criticism. Bredenberg 

PHI 307 Morality and Human Happiness. 3(3-0) F,Sum. This course raises questions 
about the relationship between morality and happiness — one's own and that of others. 
Accordingly, it explores both the nature of human happiness and the nature of justification of 
moral rights and obligations. Regan 

PHI 308 Contemporary Moral Philosophy. 3(3-0) S. This course explores contemporary 
philosophical treatment of such questions as "What is the meaning of ethical terms like 
'good,' 'bad,' 'right,' and 'wrong'?" and "How can moral judgments be justified or shown to 
be valid?" Regan 

PHI 309 Contemporary Political Philosophy. 3(3-0) F,S. This course focuses on current 
discussions of basic concepts in political philosophy, such as liberty, equality, justice, 
natural rights, and democracy, with the aim of clarifying and resolving disputes concerning 
the relation of the individual to the state. VanDeVeer 

PHI 310 Existentialism. 3(3-0) F,S. Existentialism is a major type of recent philosophy 
which has greatly influenced contemporary art, literature, and religion. This course traces 
the central existentialist motifs in the work of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, 
and others, and shows their influence upon contemporary culture. Fitzgerald 

PHI 311 Philosophical Issues in Medical Ethics. 3(3-0) F. This course examines such 
issues as the morality of abortion, suicide, and euthanasia; the meaning and function of the 
concepts of health, illness, and death; psychological intervention; paternalism in medicine; 
consent and medical experimentation; and the allocation of scarce medical resources. It con- 
siders individual rights and fairness and emphasizes conceptual clarity and the assessment of 
moral principles. VanDeVeer 

PHI 312 Philosophy of Law. 3(3-0) S. This course examines the fundamental concepts of 
legal theory. Topics for discussion include the characterization of a legal system, the 
justification of punishment, theories of responsibility, liability, and legal cause. The general 
views examined will be tested by application to concrete issues that are the subject of litiga- 
tion in the Federal courts. 

PH 317 Rationalism and Empiricism in Modern Western Philosophy. 3(3-0) F. Modern 
philosophy is said to begin with Descartes in the 17th century. This course traces the rise of 
rationalistic metaphysics from Descartes to Spinoza and Leibniz and the development of the 
empiristic critique of rationalism by the 18th century British School of Locke and 
Berkeley. Metzger 

PHI 318 Philosophy from Hume to the 20th Century. Preq: PHI 317 3(3-0) S. This course 

289 



examines the skeptical hostility to rationalist metaphysics of David Hume, the great em- 
piricist of the eighteenth century, then turns to Immanuel Kant's attempts to answer 
Hume's doubts and to reform metaphysics. The course then proceeds to explkore the Post- 
Humean and Post-Kantian philosophies of the 19th century. Metzger 

PHI 319 Roots of Contemporary Philosophy. 3(3-0) F. A critical examination of the most 
recent history of contemporary Anglo-American philosophy. Following a brief presentation of 
Nineteenth Century idealism, the course traces in detail the rise and development of realism 
in the current century. The foci of the course are the historical roots of modern scientific 
realism, beginning with the naive realism of Moore and Russell and passing successively to 
Logical Positivism, Ordinary Language philosophy, and Quinean empiricism. Auerbach 

PHI 330 Metaphysics. 3(3-0) S. An examination of metaphysical problems and questions, 
most of which have classical origins but which will usually be treated from a contemporary 
perspective. Typical problems are those connected with appearance and reality, free-will and 
determinism, mind and body, and space and time. Carter 

PHI 333 Theory of Knowledge. 3(3-0) F,S. This course is concerned with the analysis of 
such central concepts as knowledge, belief, and truth, and the investigation of the principles 
by which claims to know may be justified. 

PHI 335 Symbolic Logic. 3(3-0) F,S. An introduction to modern symbolic logic. Examina- 
tion of the procedures for the translation of certain English sentences into logical notation 
and for the manipulation of that notation, so as to produce correct inferences in it. Also an in- 
troduction to the mathematical study of logic, i.e., of the properties of the symbolic system 
itself. Levin 

PHI 336 Topics in the Philosophy of Logic and Language. 3(3-0) F,S. Each year this 
course will treat one or more of the problems associated with the philosophical investigation 
of logic and language. Among the many topics covered will be the distinction between sen- 
tences, statements, and propositions; referential opacity; the modalities; the nature of gram- 
mar; problems in semantics; and the relation between formal and natural language. Staff 

PHI 340 Philosophy of Science. 3(3-0) F,S. An examination of the character and function 
of "explanation" in scientific activity, the concepts of law and theory, the role of inductive 
confirmation, and the relationship between natural and social sciences. Nagel 

PHI 341 Topics in the Philosophy of Science. 3(3-0) S. Provides an opportunity for the 
detailed investigation of some of the special problems in contemporary philosophy of science. 
Each year the course will consider at least some of the following problems: explanation and 
tr.3ory, confirmation, philosophy of physics, philosophy of psychology, and the philosophy of 
the social sciences. Nagel 

PHI 402 Advanced Logic. Preq: PHI 335 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A formal study of the notions of 
truth and provability, this course emphasizes some of the theorems of mathematical logic 
having philosophical importance — Godel's incompleteness results and Church's theorem, 
for example. An introduction to recursive function theory. Staff 

PHI 490 Seminar in Philosophy. Preq: Six credits in PHI. 3(3-0) F,S. The seminars are 
devoted to special studies in contemporary philosophy, with emphasis on research and 
critical analysis. Students are expected to be familiar with the major doctrine? of modern 
western philosophy. Staff 

PHI 492 Philosophy Seminars on the Human Condition. 3(3-0) F,S. The seminars will 
be directed to exploring in a philosophical way the wide range of issues characterizing human 
experience and the human condition — such issues as capital punishment, abortion, civil 
rights, automation, and the quality of existence Staff 

PHI 498 Special Topics in Philosophy. Preq: Six credits in PHI. 1-6 F,S. This course is 
used to offer areas of study which appear only rarely in the curriculum. It will also function as 
a readings course for honors students in philosophy. Staff 

PHI 499 Senior Essay in Philosophy. Preq: Consent of the department. 3 F,S. In- 
dividually directed research on a topic chosen in consultation with a staff adviser. The objec- 
tive is a critical, written analysis of a well-defined topic in the thought of a major philosopher 
or in the literature of one of the main problems of philosophy. Staff 



290 



Physical Education 

(All courses are taught for one-half semester unless otherwise noted. For a final grade and 
one semester credit to be received, the student must complete a full semester of either a full 
semester course or two one-half semester courses taken in the same semester.) 

PRESCRIBED COURSES 

PE 100 M, PE 100 W (F,S) Health and Physical Fitness. (Full semester). 1(0-2) F. A lec- 
ture laboratory course to assess and improve the individual's physical fitness, and to convey 
health/fitness knowledge. 

PE 112 Beginning Swimming I. (8 or 16 weeks depending upon individual). 1(0-2) 
F,S,Sum. Teaches nonswimmers the basic swimming skills necessary to demonstrate sur- 
vival swimming ability. 

PE 113 Beginning Swimming II. 1(0-2) F,S. Prepares weak swimmers for the inter- 
mediate swimming course. 

PE 118 Restricted Activity I. 1(0-2) F,S. Meets the needs of individuals who have tem- 
porary or permanent physical impairments. Students enrolled in this program must obtain a 
restrictive form from the Student Health Service. 

PE 119 Restrictive Activity II. 1(0-2) F,S. A follow-up of PE 118. 
CONTROLLED ELECTIVE COURSES 

AQUATICS 

PE 221 Intermediate Swimming. 1(0-2) F,S,Sum. Gives the student competence in four 
basic strokes and two dives. 

PE 222 Water Sports. 1(0-2) F. Water polo and water basketball, plus improvement in 
stamina and water skills. 

PE 223 Advanced Lifesaving. Preq: PE 221 or equivalent. (Full semester). 1(0-2) F,S. 
Designed to qualify students for a Senior Red Cross Lifesaving certificate. 

PE 224 Water Safety Instructors. Preq: PE 223 or equiv. (Full semester). 1(0-2) F,S. 
Designed to qualify students for a Red Cross Water Safety Instructor's rating. 

PE 225 Scuba Diving. Preq: Demonstrate swimming proficiency. (Full semester). 1(0-2) 
F,S. Appropriate and safe use of scuba diving equipment and related in-water skills. 

COMBATIVES 

PE 232 Personal Defense. 1(0-2) F,S. To promote mastery of fear that may arise from the 
anticipation of violent personal contact and to equip students with the techniques for per- 
sonal defense. To include falls, throws, counters, locks, escapes. 

PE 233 Boxing. 1(0-2) F,S. Acquaints the student with the fundamentals, skills, history 
and rules. Emphasis on defensive techniques. 

PE 238 Wrestling. 1(0-2) F,S. Wrestling skills at the beginning level; teaching developing 
strength and endurance; and fostering good sportsmanship in a combative sport. 

DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES 

PE 1 17 Gymnastics. 1(0-2) F,S. Fundamentals on the parallel bars, side horse, trampoline 
and mats. 

PE 231 Body Mechanics. 1(0-2) F,S. A program of physical development and coordinated 
movement. 

PE 236 Track and Field. 1(0-2) F,S. Develops knowledge, skill and interest in track and 
field events. 

PE 237 Weight Training. 1(0-2) F,S. Provides essential knowledge of the principles of 
muscular strength development; and, an opportunity to acquire skill in a variety of pro- 
gressive resistance exercises. 

PE 239 Modern Dance. 1(0-2) F,S. Knowledge, skill and application of modern dance. It 
emphasizes the basic fundamentals of body movement executed to music. 

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INDIVIDUAL SPORTS 

PE 234 Square Dance. 1(0-2) F,S. Coeducational course in square dance covering mixers, 
clogging, Schottische, two-step, Polka, Waltz, and Mazurka. Western square dancing also 
included. 

PE 240 Social Dance. 1(0-2) F,S. Fundamentals of leading and following including fox- 
trot, swing, waltz, cha-cha-cha and rumba. 

PE 241 Angling. 1(0-2) F,S. Spin, fly and bait casting and an understanding of game 
fishing. 

PE 242 Badminton. 1(0-2) F.S.Sum. Skill development in the fundamental skills and 
strategy of the sport are emphasized. Includes history and rules of competition. 

PE 243 Bowling. 1(0-2) F,S. Ball selection, grips, stance and delivery along with rules, 
history, scoring and the general theory of spare coverage. 

PE 244 Fencing. 1(0-2) F,S. Fundamentals, skills, techniques and rules. 

PE 245 Golf. 1(0-2) F,S,Sum. Teaches beginners the grip, stance, swing and use of the 
various clubs, along with the history of sport and etiquette of play. 

PE 246 Handball. 1(0-2) F,S. Fundamental skills, history and rules. 

PE 247 Roller Skating. 1(0-2) F. The fundamental skills of skating, emphasizing balance 
and speed. 

PE 248 Squash. 1(0-2) F,S. Fundamental skills, history and rules. 

PE 249 Tennis I. 1(0-2) F,S,Sum. Gives beginners a knowledge of history, rules and 
strategy as well as fundamental skills of tennis. 

PE 250 Tennis II. Preq: PE 249 or equivalent. 1(0-2) F,S. A follow-up of PE 249 with 
emphasis on game strategy and doubles play. 

PE 251 Target Archery 1(0-2) F,S, Sum. Emphasizes development of fundamental skills; 
including safety, competition, and selection and care of equipment. 

PE 252 Downhill Skiing. 1(0-2) F,S. Fundamentals including safety, care of equipment, 
control, straight run, turns, and slalom. Offered in December during holidays and spring 
semester break dependent upon weather conditions. Minimum of 3 days on slopes required 
for credit. 

PE 253 Orienteering. 1(0-2) F,S. To teach the skills used in the sport of orienteering. 
Orienteering is the ability to navigate on foot from defined point to defined point, with use of 
map and compass, in the shortest possible time. 

PE 254 Beginning Equitation. (Full Semester) 1(0-2) F,S. Beginning course emphasizing 
hunt seat equitation, care of horse and tack and control skills at the walk, trot and canter. 
(Offered in conjunction with MacNair's Stables under supervision of Department of Physical 
Education). 

PE 255 Sailing. Preq: Pass department swimming test. (Five days for 5 hours per day; 
CPE 255 Sailing. Preq: Pass department swimming test. (Five days for 5 hours per day; 
Camp Morehead). 1(0-2) Spec. Fundamentals of sailing including safety, care of boats, 
winds, rigging, knots and basic sailing language. To be taught after commencement in a five- 
day period. (At least three days on boats required for credit). 

TEAM SPORTS 

PE 116 Soccer. 1(0-2) F,S. Emphasizes the basic skills of soccer. Team offense and defense 
are taught. Includes competitive experience in class. 

PE 260 Lacrosse. 1(0-2) F,S. Designed to teach the history, rules, strategy and fundamen- 
tal skills of Lacrosse. 

PE 261 Basketball (Men). 1(0-2) F,S. Emphasizes offensive and defensive skills de- 
velopment and systems of team work. Includes coverage of history and rules of the sport. 

PE 262 Basketball (Women). 1(0-2) F,S. Emphasizes offensive and defensive skills de- 
velopment and systems of team work. Includes coverage of history and rules of sport. 

PE 263 Field Hockey. 1(0-2) S. History, rules and strategy. Fundamental skills. 



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PE 264 Soccer (Women). 1(0-2) F. Fundamental skills of the game. Vigorous outdoor 
team sport. 

PE 265 Softball. 1(0-2) F.S.Sum. Fundamental skills, history and rules. 

PE 267 Touch Football. 1(0-2) F. Skills, history, rules and strategy of touch football. 

PE 268 Touch Football (Women). 1(0-2) F. Skills, history, rules and strategy of touch 
football. 

PE 269 Volleyball. 1(0-2) F,S,Sum. Skills, history, rules and strategy. 

VARSITY SPORTS 

PE 271 Varsity Sports I. 1(0-2) F,S. For students transferring to a varsity sport for a term 
(eight weeks) for the first time. 

PE 272 Varsity Sports II. 1(0-2) F,S. For students making their second transfer to a var- 
sity sport. 

PE 273 Varsity Sports III. 1(0-2) F,S. For students making their third transfer to a var- 
sity sport. 

PE 274 Varsity Sports IV. 1(0-2) F,S. For students making their fourth transfer to a var- 
sity sport. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

PE 280 Emergency Medical Care and First Aid. (Full semester). 2(2-0) F,S. Knowledge 
and techniques for rendering prompt and appropriate first aid and/or emergency medical 
care in situations when the services of qualified medical personnel are unavailable or de- 
layed. (This course does not constitute credit toward meeting physical education re- 
quirements.) 

PE 285 Personal Health. (Full semester). 2(2-0) F,S. This course does not constitute 
credit toward meeting physical education requirements. A lecture-discussion course with 
emphasis on personal health including mental health, alcoholism, drugs, sexuality, nutri- 
tion, family health, diseases, health quackery and health practitioners. 

Physical Oceanography 

OY (MAS) 200 Introduction to the Marine Environment. Preq: High school physics, 
chemistry, algebra, trigonometry, and biology, or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. The ocean as a part 
of our environment; subjects include interactions between atmosphere and ocean, ocean 
circulation, physical and chemical properties of sea water, marine geology, and marine 
biology. 

OY (CE, MAS) 487 Physical Oceanography. Preq: MA 202, PY 212. 3(3-0) F. History of 
physical oceanography; the geological and astronomical background for the field; tides and 
waves; fluid mechanics; characteristics of sea water; advective and convective processes; 
current measurements; laboratory models; and specific problems in physical oceanography. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

OY (CE, MAS) 541 Gravity Wave Theory I. Preq: EMS 303 or PY 411. 3(3-0) S. 
Classical gravity wave theory with emphasis on the basic mechanics of wave motions, mass 
transport induced by waves and various conservation laws with their applications in wave 
study. Graduate Staff 

OY (MAS) 551 Ocean Circulation. Preq: ESM 303 or PY 411. 3(3-0) S. Basic study of the 
mechanics of the ocean circulation with emphasis on various simple models of circulation 
systems. Pietrafesa 

Physics 

PY 201, 202, 203 General Physics. Preq: MA 102. 4(3-3) F,S. Intended primarily for ma- 
jors in physical and mathematical sciences and nuclear engineering. Staff 

PY 205, 208 General Physics. Preq: MA 102. 4(3-3) F,S. Required in most engineering 
curricula. A study of classical and modern physics in which the analytical approach is em- 



293 



ployed. Demonstration lectures, recitations, problem drill and laboratory work give a work- 
ing knowledge of basic principles. PY 205, mechanics, sound and heat; PY 208, electricity, 
light and modern physics. Staff 

PY 211, 212 General Physics. Preq: (211) MA 111 or 116; (212) PY 211. 4(3-2) F,S,Sum. 
Designed to provide a basic though not specialized knowledge of physics. Lecture- 
demonstration, recitation and laboratory give a working familiarity with basic principles of 
mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, light and modern physics. Staff 

PY 221 College Physics. Preq: MA 111 or 115. 5(5-0) F,S. Fundamental principles applied 
to modern science and technology. Important concepts in the classical areas of physics, along 
with a brief survey of modern atomic physics. Lectures and demonstrations with class par- 
ticipation. Staff 

PY 223 Astronomy. 3(2-2) F,S. An introductory, descriptive survey designed primarily for 
the non-science major, but open to all. Discussion of such recent spectacular advances in as- 
tronomy as space probes, pulsars, quasars, black holes, etc. Laboratory opportunities for 
direct observation of celestical objects and for experiments demonstrating the methods and 
techniques of astronomical research. Patty 

PY 231 Physics for Non-Scientists. For liberal arts students only. 3(3-0) F,S. An elemen- 
tary course for non-science students. The history, philosophy, methods and fundamental 
concepts of physics with applications to everyday modern living. Topics in mechanics, heat, 
electricity, light, relativity, quantum concepts, and atomic and nuclear phenomena. 

Seagondollar 

PY 232 Physics in Contemporary Society. Preq: PY 231 or 221 or 201-202 or 205-208 or 
211-212. 3(3-0) F,S. A look at how our surroundings can be influenced and understood in 
terms of basic physical principles. Topics include energy sources (e.g., nuclear, solar, etc.), 
purposes of orbiting satellites, space travel and relativitiy, as well as applications of physics 
to medical, biological and environmental problems. Emphasis on "Trans-Science", where 
science and society interact. Topics depend on student interest. Seagondollar 

PY 240 Exophysics. Preq: MA 111 or equiv. 3(3-0) F,S. A wide range of principles of 
physics is employed to examine problems in exophysics. Topics include conditions for life on 
other planets, possibility of extraterrestrial intelligence and the problems of interstellar com- 
munications. Mitchell 

PY 245 Physical Principles of Photography. Preq: PY 203 or 208 or 212 or 221 or 231; 
CH 101 or 111. 3(2-3) F,S. The physics and chemistry of the photographic process. Students 
must furnish their own cameras. Cobb 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PY 401, 402 Modern and Quantum Physics I, II. Preq: PY 411. 3(3-0) F,S. The basic 
theories of modern physics, particularly relativity and quantum mechanics. Application of 
these theories to atomic structure, optical spectra, x rays, nuclear physics, solid state physics 
and elementary particles. Park 

PY 407 Introduction to Modern Physics. Preq: MA 202, PY 208. 3(3-0) F,S. The impor- 
tant developments in atomic and nuclear physics this century. Topics include: an intro- 
duction to special relativity, atomic and molecular structure, determination of properties of 
ions and fundamental particles, the origin of spectra, and nuclear reactions. Staff 

PY 410 Introductory Nuclear Physics. Preq: PY 203 or 407. 4(3-2) F,S. The properties of 
the nucleus, and the interaction of radiation with matter. A quantitative description of 
natural and artificial radioactivity, nuclear reactions, fission, fusion and the structure of sim- 
ple nuclei. Waltner 

PY 411, 412 Mechanics I, II. Preq: PY 203 or 208, MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. Intermediate 
theoretical mechanics of particles, systems of particles, fluids, and moving reference systems. 
The first course emphasizes the Newtonian formulation; the second introduces the 
Lagrangian and Hamiltonian viewpoints. Jenkins 

PY 413 Thermal Physics. Preq: PY 202 or 208; Coreq: MA 301. 3(3-0) S. An introduction 
to the statistical study of macroscopic systems. First principles of heat and thermodynamics 
are reviewed. Subsequent topics covered include basic concepts of probability, the macro- 



294 



scopic states of large systems, the concepts of temperature, heat, and entropy, and the re- 
lation between these quantities. Schetzina 

PY 414, 415 Electricity and Magnetism I, II. Preq: PY 203 or 208, MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 
An intermediate course in the fundamentals of static and dynamic electricity and electro- 
magnetic theory, developed from basic experimental laws. Vector methods are introduced 
and employed throughout the course. Manring 

PY 441 Spacetime Physics. Preq: PY 203 or 407. 3(3-0) F. An elementary introduction to 
the concepts and problems of spacetime physics in accord with Einstein's special theory of 
relativity. Historically interesting problems, e.g., the so-called clock or twin paradox, and 
modern problems treated by the application of the conservation laws of momentum and 
energy in the natural geometry of spacetime. Davis 

PY 451, 452 Intermediate Experiments in Physics I, II. Coreq: PY 411, 414. 2(1-3) F,S. 
Experiments in mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics. Haase 

PY 499 Special Problems in Physics. Preq: Consent of department. 1-3 F,S. Study and 
research in classical and modern physics. Topics for experimental or theoretical investi- 
gation, or a literature survey. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PY 506 Nuclear Physics I. Preq: PY 203 or 407; PY 412. 4(3-2) F. Nuclear properties and 
phenomena such as alpha, beta and gamma decay, accelerator-induced nuclear reactions 
and fission. Emphasis on experimental techniques for probing nuclear structure and inter- 
pretation of results in terms of current theories. Tilley 

PY 508 Ion and Electron Physics. Preq: PY 414. 3(2-2) S. Topics include collision 
processes, electron emission, charged particle dynamics, gaseous discharges, and the physics 
of ion and electron beams. Doggett 

PY 509 Plasma Physics. Preq: PY 414. 3(3-0) F. The individual and collective motion of 
charged particles in electric and magnetic fields and through ionized gases. Doggett 

PY 510 Nuclear Physics II. Preq: PY 410. 4(3-2) S. The properties of the atomic nucleus 
as revealed by radioactivity, nuclear reactions and scattering experiments, with emphasis on 
the experimental approach. The laboratory stresses independent research and offers project 
work in nuclear spectroscopy and in neutron physics. Waltner 

PY (NE) 511 Nuclear Physics for Engineers. Preq: PY 410. 3(3-0) F. The properties of 
atomic nuclei, of nuclear radiations and of the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter. 
Emphasis on the principles of modern equipment and techniques of nuclear measurement 
and their application to practical problems. Waltner 

PY 516 Physical Optics. Preq: PY 415. 3(2-2) F. Emphasis on the wave properties of light. 
Subjects include boundary conditions, optics of thin films, interference and diffraction, ap- 
plications to absorption, scattering, and laser operation. A background in Maxwell's equa- 
tions and vector analysis is required. Schetzina 

PY 517 Atomic and Molecular Physics. Preqs: PY 401, 412. 3(3-0) F. The quantum 
mechanical treatment of structure and spectra for atoms and molecules. Topics include the 
hydrogen atom, helium atom, multielectron atoms, selection rules, diatomic and simple 
polyatomic molecules, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Johnson 

PY 520 Measurements in Nuclear Physics. Preq: PY 410. 3(2-2) S. The fundamentals of 
statistics (including the binominal, normal, Poisson and interval distributions) as applied to 
the analysis of measurements on nuclear reactions and radioactivity. Waltner 

PY 521 Kinetic Theory of Gases. Preq: PY 413. 3(3-0) F. A phenomenological and 
theoretical study of systems of dilute gases. After treatment of the continuum mechanics of 
fluids, the postulates of kinetic theory are presented and the derivation from them of macro- 
scopic conservation equations, transport laws and thermodynamic properties is 
discussed. Parker 

PY 543 Astrophysics. Preq: PY 203 or 407; PY 411. 3(3-0) S. The basic physics necessary 
to investigate, from observational data, the internal conditions and evolution of stars. Topics 
include the formation and structure of spectral lines, methods of energy generation and 
transport, stellar structure, degeneracy, white dwarfs and neutron stars. Danby 

295 



PY (EE) 552 Introduction to the Structure of Solids. Preq: PY 401. 3(3-0) S. Basic con- 
siderations of crystalline solids, metals, conductors and semiconductors. Lado 

PY (MA) 555 Mathematical Introduction to Celestial Mechanics. 3(3-0) F. (See 
mathematics, page 270.) 

PY (MA) 556 Orbital Mechanics. 3(3-0) S. (See mathematics, page 270.) 

PY 581, 582 Quantum Mechanics I, II. Preq: MA 512; PY 411 or 414; grad. standing or 
permission of graduate administrator. 3(3-0) F,S. Fundamental concepts and formulations, 
including interpretation and techniques, and the application of theory to simple physical 
systems, such as the free particle, the harmonic oscillator, the particle in a potential well and 
central force problems. Other topics include approximation methods, identical particles and 
spin, transformation theory, symmetries and invariance, and an introduction to quantum 
theory of scattering and angular momentum. Lado 

PY 583, 584 Advanced Classical Mechanics I, II. Preq: MA 512, PY 412, PY 414; grad. 
standing or permission of the graduate administrator. 3(3-0) F,S. An introduction to 
theoretical physics in preparation for advanced study. Emphasis is on classical mechanics, 
special relativity and the motion of charged particles. Topics include variational principles, 
Hamiltonian dynamics and the canonical transformation theory, structure of the Lorentz 
group and elementary dynamics of unquantized fields. Hall 

PY 585, 586 Advanced Electricity and Magnetism I, II. Preq: PY 415; grad. standing or 

permission of the graduate administrator. 3(3-0) F,S. Topics include: techniques for the solu- 
tion of potential problems, development of Maxwell's equations; wave equations, energy, 
force and momentum relations of an electromagnetic field; covariant formulation of electro- 
dynamics; radiation from accelerated charges. Chung 

PY 599 Senior Research. Preq: Sr. honors program standing, except with special per- 
mission. 3 F,S. Investigations in physics under staff guidance. May consist of literature re- 
views, experimental measurements or theoretical studies. Staff 

Physiology 

PHY (ANS) 502 Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates. 3(3-0) S. (See animal 
science, page 189.) 

PHY 503 General Physiology I. Preq: Sr. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. The general princi- 
ples of homeostasis emphasizing the importance of integrative action. Study of following 
systems: respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, reproductive, and myological. Longmuir, Staff 

PHY 504 General Physiology II. Preq: Sr. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. The general princi- 
ples of homeostasis emphasizing integrative action. Study of: alimentary, reticuloen- 
dothelial, central nervous, autonomic nervous, and endocrine systems; detoxification 
mechanisms; special senses, and the response of man to the environment. Longmuir, Staff 

PHY (ZO) 513 Comparative Physiology. 4(3-3) S. (See zoology, page 329.) 

PHY (BCH) 533 Physiological Biochemistry. 3(3-0) S. (See biochemistry, page 192.) 

PHY (BCH) 553 Physiological Biochemistry. 3(3-0) (See biochemistry, page 192.) 

PHY (ZO, ENT) 575 Physiology of Invertebrates. Preq: CI. 3(3-0) S. The course deals 
with the physiology of the invertebrates, including the Insecta but excluding the Protozoa. 
The unity of the physiology of the various groups is stressed, and the relationship of 
physiology to contemporary biology and to other related biological fields will be il- 
lustrated. Graduate Staff 

PHY (ANS) 580 Mammalian Endocrine Physiology. 3(3-0) F. (See animal science, page 
189.) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PHY 590 Special Problems in Physiology. Preq: CI. Credits Arranged. 



296 



Plant Pathology 

PP 315 Plant Diseases. Preq: BS 100. 3(2-3) F,S. The nature and symptoms of plant dis- 
ease and characteristics of plant pathogenic nematodes, viruses, bacteria and fungi. Con- 
cepts and methods of disease control developed, based on knowledge of major types of 
diseases. Strider, Beute 

PP (FOR) 318 Forest Pathology. Preq: BS 100 or equivalent. 4(3-2) S. Major types of 
diseases of forest trees and deterioration of wood products are studied emphasizing: 1) princi- 
ples of plant pathology; 2) symptomatology and diagnosis; 3) nature of disease-causing 
agents; 4) physiology, ecology and dissemination of dise